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February 27, 1980 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-02-27

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OVERCOMES EARL Y SE TBA CKS

The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, February 27, 1980-Page 9'.

A.

Bodnar ,makes

By STAN BRADBURY
He also serves who sits and waits .. .
.. . and waits, and waits. For junior guard Mark
Bodnar it has been a long wait with a lot of sitting.
But then again that might be all in, the past as the
realization of the above cliche has begun.
He has not exploded onto the Michigan basketball
scene like his twin brother, Marty, did last year as a
sophomore. Mark has merely merged quietly into the
flow of the Wolverine game plan-used primarily as a
steady guard late in the game in crucial situations.
The reason for Mark's appearance on the hard
court can be summedup in one word-character.
The story of Mark, howevet, cannot be told without
reviewing Marty as well.
The two Bodnars came to Michigan from Barberton,
Ohio, where they had just led their team to 51
consecutive wins and a mythical prep national
championship.
"We wanted to go to school together," Mark said.
"We told recruiters if you don't want both of us,
forget it. Michigan had just won the national
championship but they were losing both (Ricky)
Freen and (Steve) Grote so they wanted both of us."
At the time basketball started when they were
freshmen, their careers parted ways and it became
A Tale of Two Brothers.'
Mark said, "We knew our first year we wouldn't be
playing much." True, but while Marty was
practicing, learning, and keeping in shape Mark was
hampered with a stress fracture in his foot which
began bothering him the fourth day of practice.
During their sophomore years it was the best of
times and the worst of times for- Marty and Mark,
respectively. Marty was a regular starter and
leading the Big Ten in field goal percentage. Mark
missed the first five weeks of practice because his
foot's stress fracture reoccured and it had to go into a
cast.
Then came this season. Mark worked hard in
practice and Marty played hard in games and was co-

captain, but playing time never materialized for the
lesser known of the Bodnar pair.
Assistant coach Bill Frieder said, "Mark's biggest
disadvantage at the beginning of the year was that
the four other guards had played more and had a lot
more experience.''
And so the season went as Marty, Keith Smith,
Johnny Johnson and Mark Lozier divided up the
playing time. Mark sat on the bench as the
Wolverines dropped clutch games against Toledo,
Indiana, Northwestern, Michigan State, etc.
"We started using Mark when we were getting
some inconsistencies out of the other four," Frieder
said.
As opportunity knocked, Mark responded

is Mark
promptly. Michigan was at Wisconsin seeking their
first road triumph of the conference season. Mark got
the chance to play down the wire and the Wolverines
won.
Back at Crisler, Mark was used. late in the
Northwestern, Illinois and Purdue games. Against
the Illini and the Boilermakers, clutch performances
were required from BOTH Bodnars.
"Mark was very instrumental in those two
victories," said Frieder. "It makes you wonder how
we would have done earlier in those other close
games if we had been using him."
Mark looked back on the games earlier this year
and said, "I didn't get an opportunity to play and I
was down. It was just a matter of keeping up a good
attitude. I really wanted to come to practice and play
well and I was doing well in the practices.
"While I was injured I was doubting myself,
thinking that maybe I wasn't good enough to play,"
Mark continued. "Seeing Marty do well helped me. I
knew I was as good as Marty but he had just gotten
ahead of me. If I had been healthy I think you would
have seen Marty and I playing more together."
The 6-3. business major continued, "I'm not an
envous or jealous person. I'm happy for Marty and
everything he's accomplished." The two Bodnars
still live together on campus and take practically the
same classes.
Mark says he thinks a successful senior year
actually begins this season. "I need playing time to
give the coaches confidence in me and I need some
confidence in myself. I'm really looking forward to it
(a tournament berth) so I have more opportunities to
play. If I play well at the end of this season it will give
me a good start on next year. That's why it is so
important for me to finish strong this year," Bodnar
concluded.
Frieder said, "It's a credit to his character that he
waited for the opportunity. He's really come along
considering the fact he was injured the first two
years. He really kept in shape."
But most of all he waited.

Michig
Name
Eaves ................
Baseotto ..................
Lerg .......................
Manning..............
Blum....................
Tippet................
Richmond..............
Speers ....................
Ha mpson ..................
Bourne ....................
May.....................
Lundberg..............
Milburn ...................
Todd ......................
Reid ..................
Mars....................
Brandrup...............
Perry .....................
Brennan.................
VanBiesbruck..........
Fricker ................
Richter...............
Tessier ....................
Varvari ....:..............
Sutton..................
OTHER ...............
MICTI;AT ...........
Goalie (Record)
B. Sutton (1-0)
P. Fricker (18-10-2)
R. Varvari (2-1)
MICHIGAN (21-11-2)
OPPONENTS (11-21-2)

an's 34-Game
OVERALL (21-11-2)

Hockey

WCHA(1210-2)
GP G A PTS

GP
29
34
34
34
33
34
34
26
26
28
33
33
34
26
34
22
22
22
12
7
31
29
16
5
2
34

G A PTS
35 41 76
29 43 72
35 34 69
7 39 46,
7 36 43
12 18 30
9 19 28
9 13 22
7 12 19
8 9 17
7 10 17
2 14 16
6 6 12
4 8 12
3 6 9
4 4 8
1 6 7
0 4 4
1 2 3
1 2 3
0 3 3
0 3 3
0 1 1
0 0 0
0 0 0
1 6 7
188 339 527
GOALIE STATISTICS
G GA AVG. SAV PCT.
2 1 1.76 34 .944
31 131 4.39 1000 .884
5 17 4.42 125 .880
34 150 4.30 1159 .885.
34 188 5.39 996 .841

19
24
24
24
is
217
24
24
18
17
21
24
24
24
18
24
18
18
12
6
5
24
20
10
2.

27 45
26 47
19 45
22 27
26 ~ 30
10 18
13 19-
9 s
8 ..11.
6 9
14 13,
3 7
5 6
2
5 .6
0 0
11
2
2 '2
3 .3,
1 1t
0p
56'

Stats

li

G
1
24
2
24
24

24 121 217 338
GA AVG. SAV pc
1 7.03 9 ,
108 4.71 796F
3 2.26 48 =97
112 4.59 853
121 4.96 679

Mark Bodnar ...
.. .coming into his own

SPORTS OF THE DAILY:
Templeton: 4 million dollar man

YOUR COLLEGE RING
PLUS A CASH REBATE!
When you trade-in your men's
10K gold high school ring for .. 11.00
on a Lustrium college ring,
America's newest fine
Jeweler'salloy ....... ,... .....
Your rebate ........ ... ,....42.05
Trade in your women's 10K gold high
school ring for $49.00 and buy your
Lustrium college ring for only $19.95.
10K gold high school trade-ins also apply
on all Josten's 10K gold college rings.
Wed.-Fri.-11:00-4:00
MICHIGAN UNION-Main Lobby
JOSTEN'S
THE RING PEOPLE.
February only

ST. LOUIS (AP)-All-star shortstop
Garry Templeton has agreed to a six-
year contract which reportedly will pay
him more than $4 million, the St. Louis
Cardinals announced yesterday.
The Cardinals, in keeping with their
policy, declined to specify Templeton's
pay. The flashy infielder, a switch-
hitter, led the, National League with 211
Pfits in 1979.
"I'M VERY HAPPY. I couldn't ask
for anything more," Templeton said at
a news conference. "I'm looking
forward to being with the Cardinals for
six more years and maybe longer."
Templeton's -clause, as doe's a
multiyear contract signed last month
by first baseman Keith Hernandez,
contains a built-in veto of a trade to
certain clubs. The player said six clubs
are involved but did not identify them.
"I promise some excitement in the
years ahead-hopefully all on the
field," said Templeton, who a year ago
engaged in a bitter contract dispute
before signing a one-year pact.
WCHA STANDINGS

TEMPLETON, WHO has 654 hits in a
little over three rmajor-league
campaigns, joins Hernandez and
switch-hitting catcher Ted Simmons as
the highest-paid Cardinal players.
Last month, Hernandez signed a five-
year contract for a believed $3.8
million. Simmons signed a five-year
agreement in 1978 for pay estimated at
$3 million.
Templeton, who led the National
League with 40 errors in 1978, reduced
that number to 34 a year ago. He
participated in 102 double plays,
becoming the first switch-hitter in
major league history to total at least 100
hits from each side of the plate.
Atlanta after Craig
BOSTON (AP)-U.S. Olympic
hockey goaltender Jim Craig soon may
be wearing the colors of the Atlanta
Flames of the National Hockey League,
according to his lawyer.
Bob Murray, Craig's attorney,
reported "significant progress"
yesterday in negotiations with Flames

General Manager Cliff Fletcher.
Murray said he expected that further
talks might yield a final agreement
within a day.
FLAMES OFFICIALS met twice with
Murray earlier this week in Lake
Placid, N.Y., after the spirited
American squad captured the gold
medal with a 4-2 victory over Finland.
Craig, a former Boston University star,
played all six games for the Americans.
David Poile, the Flames' assistant
general manager, has said if a contract
is signed, there is a good chance Craig
willbe in goal Saturday night against
the visiting Colorado Rockies.,
Murray hesitated on that point,
noting it would be "difficult for him to
perform" after such brief practice time
with his new teammrates.
NY, Ixpos tampering?
NEW YORK (AP) - Commissioner
Bowie Kuhn will look into charges that
the New York Yankees and Montreal
Expos have tampered with Dave Win-
field of the San Diego Padres, although

the Padres have not brought the matter
to the commissioner's attention, a
spokesman for Kuhn said yesterday.
Ballard Smith said Monday he knew
Montreal Manager Dick Williams had
talked to Winfield in Las Vegas, Nev.,
and told him the Expos would like to
have' him on the club and that a
Yankees' publicity person told Winfield
the same thing.
Mickey Morabito, Yankees public
relations director, told The Associated
Press by telephone from Fort Lauder-
dale, Fla., that the Yankees had not
talked to Winfield but that the Padres
had been in contact with him about the
power-hitting center fielder.
Smith has said the Padres have no in-
tention of meeting Winfield's demand
for a 10-year, $20-million contract.

4

TEAM W
*North Dakota 19
-..MICHIGAN ....... 12
Iuinnesota ....... 16
Notre Dame ......13
Colorado College .. 14
Minnesota-Duluth 14
Michigan Tech 11
Wisconsin.....12
Michigan State .... 11
Denver ...... t 8
*Clinched WCHA title

L
6
10
14
12
13
16
13,
16
15
15

T
1
2
0
1
0
0
0

PCT.
.750
.542
.533
.519
.518
.467
.462
.429
.423
.354

WEEKEND SCHEDULE
MICHIGAN at Michigan State (Fri.)
.".ichigan State at MICHIGAN (Sat.)
*Minnesota at Notre Dame
North Dakota at Wisconsin
Michigan Tech at Minnesota-Duluth
Colorado College at Denver (Fri.)
Denver at Colorado College (Sat.)
SCORES
NBA
Chicago 105, Utah 85
Milwaukee 122, San Diego 88
oston 108, Atlanta 97
W NHL
Washington 5, Los Angeles 3
College Basketball
Northern Illinois 58, Miami (0.) 53
Iona 69, Farleigh Dickinson 53
Bowling Green 54. Eastern Michigan 49
Kansas 75, Colorado 65
Bradley 98. Tulsa 76

Live-
In
Concert
SUIDA Y,
MARCH 2
8:00 PM

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Athletics. Pastime. Everyone
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To play, compete, or 'ust to watch. Meijer is one of the
biggest sporting goods stores around. No matter what
your sport is, Meijer Thrifty Acres has the quality gear
and the same name brands you want, priced to save you
money. So, instead of spending your last
dime at the sporting specialty goods store,
why not jog on over to Meijer and save
some money. Maybe enough for two seats
behind the dugout. Whatever your sport,
Meijer can outfit you. On the court,
diamond, or field.
And off. ed ato l

It

f.

hi

y+
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at
THE PUNCH AND JUDY THEATER
21 Kercheval (between Cadieux and Morass)
Grosse Pointe Farms 48236
Info: CallI881-2621 or 881-2618

L

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gonna be late?
Agair?

Six miles southeast of campus on Carpenter Road.
- -
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