100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 27, 1980 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-02-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

0

The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, February 27, 1980-Page 5
'Jazz'.surprises Oscarwatchers

HOLLYWOOD (AP)-All That Jazz,
Bob Fosse's controversial musical
autobiography, scored a surprising
nine nominations in the Oscar
*preliminaries Monday, tying Kramer
vs. Kramer, the highly-praised story of
a child custody battle.
The massive Vietnam War epic
Apocalypse Now, placed third with
eight nominations for the 52nd annual
Academy Awards. Next came Breaking
Away with five, then The China
Syndrome, Norma Rae and The Rose,
with four apiece.
Reviews were decidedly mixed for
All That Jazz and it was mostly
overlooked in early-season awards. But
Academy voters were obviously more
impressed with Fosse's mixture of
death and entertainment, nominating
the film for best picture.
Other best-picture nominees were
Kramer vs. Kramer, Apocalypse Now,
Breaking Away, a modestly budgeted
comedy about four youths reaching
maturity in Bloomington, Indiana, and
Norma Rae, a story of labor organizing
at a Southern textile mill.
The China Syndrome, which proved
an amazing parallel to events at Three
Mile Island, was unexpectedly omitted
as a best picture contender. But the

film brought nominations for stars
Jane Fonda and Jack Lemmon. They
are the only previous winners among
those mentioned for the top acting
honors.
ALSO NAMED for best actress: Jill
Clayburgh, Starting Over; Sally Field,
Norma Rae; Marsha Mason, Chapter
Two, and Bette Midler, The Rose.
Besides Lemmon, the best actor
nomjnees were: Dustin Hoffman,
Kramer vs. Kramer; Al Pacino,. .
And Justice for All; Roy Scheider,. All
That Jazz; and Peter Sellers, Being
There.
For supporting actress: Jane
Alexander, Kramer vs. Kramer;
Barbara Barrie, Breaking Away;
Candice Bergen, Starting Over; Mariel
Hemingway, Manhattan, and Meryl
Streep, Kramer vs. Kramer.
FOR SUPPORTING actor: Melvyn
Douglas, Being There; Robert Duvall,
Apocalypse Now; Frederic Forrest,
The Rose; Justin Henry, Kramer vs.
Kramer, and Mickey Rooney, The
Black Stallion.
Henry, as the pawn in the divorce
battle of Kramer vs. Kramer, became
at age 8 the youngest candidate for an
Oscar.
All the best-picture nominees won

nominations for their directors except
Norma Rae. A surprise nominee was
Edouard Molinaro, who directed the
French-Italian La Cage Aux Follies. He
joined Bob Fosse of All That Jazz;
Francis Coppola, Apocalypse Now;
Peter Yates, Breaking Away, and
Robert Benton, Kramer vs. Kramer.
Nominated for best foreign language
film: The Maids of Wilco, Poland;
Mama Turns a Hundred, Spain; A
Simple Story, France; The Tin Drum,
West Germany; To Forget Venice,

NtC' ~tFE

The flying nun and Ratso Rizzo may
seem an unusual combination, but both
are in contention for the best actor/
actress Academy Award. Dustin Hoff-
man may finally receive the Oscar he
deserves for "Kramer vs. Kramer,"
but while Sally Field's performance in
"Norma Rae" was surprisingly cred-
ible, some critics feel it's hardly Oscar
material. But then again, Bette Midler
was nominated also ...

Director Bob Foose shown here on the
set of "All That Jazz." Fosse set the
story of his own mental and physical
breakdown in a controversial musical
comedy which has become the surprise
success of the Academy Award nomina-
tions.
Italy.
Finally named in the best song
category: "It Goes Like It Goes," from
Norma Rae; "The Rainbow
Connection," from The Muppet Movie;
"It's Easy to Say," from 10; "Through
the Eyes of Love," from Ice Castles,
and "I'll Never Say Goodbye," from
The Promise.
The nominations were announced
Monday morning with the usual media
hoopla. The Academy Award winners
will be announced on April 14.

Learn how to take control, make the best use
get things accomplished, and enjoy life, too.
Sponsored by Student Organizations,
Activities, and Programs
1310 Michigan Union
For information about upcoming workshop
please call763-5911

of your time,

TIME MANAGEMENT SEMINAR
Wednesday, February 27, noon-Ipm
Kuenzei Room, Michigan Union

The soon-to-be famous hospital bed scene from Bob Fosse's autobiographi-
cal musical "All That Jazz." Although panned by many critics, the film
garnered more Oscar nominations than any other, including a best actor
for Roy Scheider shown here recuperating from a heart attack in well-
choreographed fashion.

W, y

R E C O R D S

BY TIMOTHY YAGLE
Aerosmith currently is in the midst of
a long convalescing period. The four
LPs prior to Draw the Line propelled
the Boston-based quintet to inter-
national fame and they were ranked by
many at the "supergroup" level, along
with Led Zeppelin and the Stones.
But after their fourth LP Rocks, the
bottom dropped out from under "the
bad boys from Boston" as- they have
been dubbed, and Draw the Line (the
album with hilarious caricatures of the
band members on the front) was a
complete flop commercially and ar-
tistically. This naturally caused some
people in rock music circles to question
Aerosmith's legitimacy as a
supergroup. So while rock fans were
wondering where the hard rocking
quintet faltered, the band, its puzzled
management and its terrified record
company huddled to conjure up a way
to revitalize the Aerosmith machine.
During this pow-wow, Live Bootleg was
released. While that double live set
covered some mileage on the pothole-
filled road back to success, the old
Aerosmith magic on albums such as
Rocks and Toys In. The Attic, was still
missing. Bootleg, at least gave
Aerosmith fans something to listen to.
THE BAND recently emerged from
isolation with both a new album and a
real surprise. The album is called Night
In The Ruts and the surprise is the ab-
sence of lead guitarist Joe Perry from
the established Aerosmith roster.
Perry has said that his musical ideas
Were different from what Aerosmith
wanted to do collectively, so he left the
band to form "The Joe Perry Project.
But at least Perry was nice enough to
finish this eagerly-anticipated album
before leaving the band that nurtured
his guitar-playing talents and
established him as one of rock's
premier axe-grinders. Whether new
guitarist Jimmy Krespo can fill Perry's
big shoes remains to be seen. Billboard
magazine reports, though, that Krespo
has wasted no time corraling the
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE
PROGRAM presents
FACETS PERFORMANCE
ENSEMBLE'S
SOLiCE
THURSDAY, FEB. 28,
8 PM - POWER CENTER
Tickets at PTP in League
CALL 764-0450

spotlight for some scorching Joe Perry-
like solos on Aerosmith's current U.S.
tour.
One distinctive characteristic of
Night In The Ruts is the attempt at
musical diversity - something
Aerosmith isn't exactly well-known for.
The taste of the nine songs on the LP
range from the typic~Aerosmith hard
rockers such &s "No srprise," "Three
Mile Smile" and "Think About It," to a
milky, blues tune called "Reefer
Headed Woman" to the '60s hit
"Remember (Walkin' In the Sand)" by
the Shangri-las., Other songs like
"Lucy," "Three Mile Smile" just boun-
ce along and become banal and num-
bing and begin to sound the same. "No
Surprise," one of the three or four songs
getting airplay, hauntingly has the
same kind of melody line as "Draw the
Line" and is equally exhilarating.
ASIDE from the comparatively
smooth "No Surprise," many of the
songs are somewhat choppy and leave a
few too many rough edges to resemble
the Aerosmith sound at its pinncale
during Toys in the Attic and Rocks.
However, one tune that gets the
adrenalin flowing and is reminiscent of
the old Aerosmith is the Yardbirds

number "Think About It." Rhythm
guitarist Brad Whitford provides a
steady and crunching melody line while
Perry wails away on his guitar.
Ironically, another original yardbirds
tune that Aerosmith works, "Train
Kept A Rollin", is one of its most
recognized songs.
One aspect of the Aerosmith sound
which noticeably is not lacking is lead
vocalist Steven Tyler's incessant
screeching vocals. Until Draw The
Line, Tyler spared his admirers by
screaming into the mike only oc-
casionally. Consequently, his ear-
piercing voice became one of
Aerosmith's trademarks. The trouble
now is that Tyler thinks all the time is
the right time for torture and so his
screeching voice is more than ever
evident on Night in the Ruts.
NEARING PLATINUM status (one
million units sold), Night In The Ruts is
a pivotal album for Aerosmith and for
hard rock in general. Heavy metal rock
was, and still is seen by many as a
dying musical genre. It, took a Califor-
nia band called Van Halen to revitalize
it to some degree and Night In The Ruts
is expected to keep the heavy metal
steamroller going. It apparently is
doing its share of the work because it
has been nestled in Billboard's top 15
for more than a month and a half. Tyler
said recently, "We've undlergone a
change (with the album)." He did not
elaborate, but one of the changes must

be the departure of the band's musical
king pin Joe Perry. Night In The Ruts is
by no means an Aerosmith master-
piece, but it should be enough to keep
the band afloat in the stormy sea of
rock and roll for some time.

M.m. : w w A w

I r5th Aeme tL bijySt.~'76-70
ForedrFtfh ormiTheater

'%a

WINNER
3 GOLDEN GLOBE
AWARDS
Better Midler * Alan Bates

I- -
_ ..
......::.. .
CIl[I 1EfiUNH 5 9P H
TICKETS are 9.00 and 10,00 and are now on sale at the Michigan Union-
Box Office (11:30-5:30). Where House Records. Aura Sounde. Huckleberry
Party Store, and all Hudson's. For rnore information call 763-2071. Sorry,
no checks.
A MA JOR EVEN TS PR ESENTA TION

Tue.Thurs-5:30, 7:50, 18:10
Tue. Thurs--$1.50 til 5:45 (or capocity)
Wed-12:40, 3:00, 5:30, 7:50, 10:10
Wed-Si.50 til 1:00 (or copocity)
HURRY! ENDS THURSDAYI

0

r

I

TUIE OFFICE OFA AjoR EVENTS PRESENTS AN EVENING WITHI
HCMANGIOI

HOUSING REAPPLICATION
DRAWING
For students presently living in the residence
halls who wish to return to the residence
halls for the academic year 1980-81.

44k
I r

UI
II
'I

TUESDAY, March 11 -

1:30 p.m.

SIGNING OF LEASES
TUESDAY THROUGH FRIDAY
MARCH 11-MARCH 16

I

a

i

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan