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February 26, 1980 - Image 10

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The Michigan Daily, 1980-02-26

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Page 10-Tuesday, February 26, 1980-The Michigan Daily

MICHIGAN ATTRACTS LOCAL TALENT:
Runners close to. home

BY CATHY LANDIS
Michigan women's track coach Red
Simmons has a drawer crammed with
letters from New York to Hawaii, from
Texas to Montreal, sent by high school
seniors interested in running for
Michigan. But for some of his best
talent he need look no further than his
own backyard, judging from the top
performances turned in this season by
Ann Arbor natives.
Citing their improvement and scoring
power in meets, Simmons praised the
Ann Arbor quintet of Joanna Bullard,
Sue Frederick, Dede Key, Dana
Loesche, and Christina Smith. Fresh-
women Bullard, Loesche, and
Frederick have each qualified for
AIAW Nationals: Bullard in the high
jump, and Loesche and Frederick in the
distance medley relay.
KEY AND SMITH are charter mem-
bers of the indoor women's track team
which had its beginnings only three
years ago. Smith remembers that first
Big Ten meet, when Michigan was
represented by a mere five girls. "We
had the same four girls in every relay,"
she recalls. Still, they finished a respec-
table eighth out of nine teams (Min-
nesota didn't come).
Smith, a quarter-miler, came to

Michigan via Ann Arbor Huron, where
she started running track her junior
year to complement her gymnastics in
the off-season. The two sports are
mutually beneficial for flexibility and
endurance, she explained. When the
time came'to think of college, she chose
Michigan because of the school's
reputation, and she "wanted to stay
near home."
Meanwhile across town at Ann Arbor
Pioneer, Dede Key was causing some
commotion in recruiting circles with
long jumps in the neighborhood of 17
feet, as well as a decent quarter mile.
She didn't talk to Coach Simmons until
her last high school meet, but her father
did, and a scholarship offer helped seal
her decision to stay in Ann Arbor.
"Also, I had only lived here nine mon-
ths at the time," she said, "so it wasn't
as if I wanted to go somewhere new."
Before coming to Ann Arbor Key lived
nine years in Belgium, where she star-
ted running, improving enough to par-
ticipate in an All-Europe Championship
meet in Berlin.
SIMMONS CALLS Key "one of our
better long jumpers," but as Key points
out, "It's hard to do both the long jump
and the quarter mile because the two
events use different muscles."

"They showed me a pit, and I said,
"Why not?" said Bullard, telling hog
she discovered the high jump. Bullard,
a former teammate of Key's on the
Pioneer high school team, considered
at one point skipping town for Iowa
State or Arizona State, but finally chose
Michigan because "It's a good school
and I got a scholarship." A 5'7" higl?
jumper in high school (good enough for
a state championship her junior year),
Bullard has so far jumped 5'9". At any
rate, Simmons is very grateful t,
whoever showed Joanna the pit.
"I like Ann Arbor," says Sue
Frederick, another freshwoman, who
hails from nearby Huron High. So after
considering some smaller schools, she
chose Michigan because, "It's a good
school, it's right here, and it's a young
team." About her performance this
year, Coach Simmons says,
"Everything she runs is better," than
high school, adding that "she's had lit-
tle opportunity to run against good
competition in the half-mile, which i
her best event."
FREDERICK'S competition during
her Huron days was provided in part by
rival half-miler Dana Loesche, who
joined Frederick as a freshwoman on
the Wolverine team.
Loesche, who ran on Coach Simmons'
AAU team in junior high, chose
Michigan because "It has a good, young
team where I can contribute." And con-
tribute she has. According to Simmons
Loesche is one of the most improved
runners of aiiybody *on'the team. He
points to the drop in her half-mile time,
now a 2:18 compared to a 2:23.5 in high
school.t
Loesche comments that Join Fit-
zgerald, a Pioneer senior and outstan-
ding sprinter, may be coming to
Michigan next year. So it seems the
stream of local talent will continue to
supply Michigan with some of its best
track and field athletes.

Icers find gold lining in Olympic cloud
The U.S. Olympic hockey team leaps for joy after clinching the gold medal by defeating Finland, 4-2, on Sunday.
The medal was America's sixth of the XIII Winter Olympiad held in Lake Placid, N.Y. The other five belong to speed-
skater Eric Heiden, following the unprecedented feat of winning all five speedskating events.

THURSDAY
February 28, 1980
DR. EMILIO BIZZI
MIT
"Central and Peripheral Mechanisms'
In Motor Control'
MHRI Conference Room 1057
3:45 to 5:00 p.m.
TH1ANVOSCO. 514 E. Washington
welcomes you to

WINS DETROIT AVON CLASSIC
King defeats Cawley in tourney

SUNDA YBRUNCHES 11:30-4

By LAURA HAMLIN
She calls herself the Renaissance
Woman, so perhaps it was fitting that
Billy Jean King came back from middle
age to win the Avon Tennis
Championship in the Renaissance city,
defeating number one seeded Evonne
Goolagong Cawley in straight sets (6-
3) (6-0).
King accepted the first place prize of
$35,000 at Cobo Hall Sunday dedicating
her win to her orthopedic surgeon who
was recently killed in a plane, crash on
his way to the Olympics in Lake Placid,
N.Y.
"I feel like I used to when I was
winning a lot," she said. "You must
make an effort to remember how to win
and that takes time."
Four times she was ranked No. 1 in
the world, 1966-1968 and 1972 and has
been among the world's top 10 for 16 of
the last 17' years. She said she had to
prove that at 36 her tennis career was
not over. The victory over Evonne
Goolagong Cawley did just that.
Cawley, who suffered a pulled
stomach muscle on Saturday in her
victory over number-five seeded

Dianne Fromholtz, had trouble
reaching for her serves and returning
high overheads from King. "I knew
something was wrong with Evonne.
when she wasn't reacting as fst as she
usually does," said King.
"Billy Jean played very well, she had
five or six service aces and started
meeting the ball earlier," said Cawley.
Cawley also said the extra pace that
King put on her first serve was
effective.
King attributed her victory to a
change in her attitude. "I promised
myself to have a good attitude and not
let line judges, the crowd, the ballboys,
or anything else interfere," she said.
King said she would keep playing and
winning as long as her attitude
remained good.
King, who never drinks and lifts
weights to stay in shape, says she has
developed legs like Olympic gold
medalist Eric Heiden. "I have huge
thigh muscles that help me stay down
on those low volleys; it's very
important to remain low throughout the
entire follow through. I hate working
out hard but usually you see good
results."

COME AS YOU ARE for our other specials:
TU AYnight is BEER NIGHT
WEDNESDAY night is SPAGHETTI NIGHT
HURSDA Ynight is PIZZA NIGHT
See for yourself the many items included on our menu.
Prices range from 504 to $9.75

King said the U.S. victory over the
Russians in hockey raised her
competitive spirit in the tournament. "I
know what a high that must have been
for the U.S. Olympic hockey team and it
was hard to keep the excitement out of
my mind while on the court," she said.
Founder of the Women'g Sports
Foundtion in 1975 to increase the
opportunities for women to participate
in competitive sports, she feels that
politics interfering with Olympic
competition is wrong. "When you're
young, all you want to do is compete
and by a summer Olympic boycott,
politicians are using the Olympics,"
said King. "Athletes have so little
time," she added.
King said today the competition in
tennis is getting tougher all the time.
"Everyone plays better than 10 years
ago so you have to get better to stay in
the market. There are about 2,000 pros
in the 12-17 age group who want to play
professional tennis and most of them
are girls," she said.
Named Associatd Press Athlete of the
Year in 1967 and 1973 and Sports
Illustrated Sportswoman of the Year in
1972, King feels the increase in
competition in tennis has made the
sport more fun. "But you're talking to a
winner, and when you're a winner
everything seems great."

WMPL Coaches'
r Hockey Poll

1. North Dakota (6)............
2. Northern Michigan (4)........
3. Boston College ..................
4. Minnesota .....................
5. Providence .................
6. MICHIGAN ................
7. Dartmouth...... ..........
8. Ohio State ................
9. Notre Dame................
10. Vermont ...................
first place votes in parenthesis

95
9A
80
56
52
51
37
34
21
15

LOOKING FOR A GREAT SUMMER
JOB WORKING WITH CHILDREN...
COME TO TIMBER RIDGE IN WEST
VIRGINIA
A great experience! Wild & wonder-
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INTERESTED? CALL (301) 484-2233 or
write to our winter, address stat-
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background, salary desired, address,
phone, etc.
TIMBER RIDGE
c/o Fred Greenberg
23 Walker Avenue
Baltimore, Maryland 21208

M3p HTS []r TIIP
MEN'S INDOOR TRACK
Feb. 29-Mar. 1 Big Ten Champion-
ships, at Madison
MEN'S GYMNASTICS
Feb. 28 vs. Michigan State, at East
Lansing
Mar. 7-8 Big Ten Championships, at
Bloomington
WOMEN'S INDOOR TRACK
Mar. 7-8 AIAW National Indoor
Championships, at Columbia, MO
MEN'S BASKETBALL
Feb. 28 vs. Iowa,at Iowa City
Mar. 1 vs. Minnesota, at Minneapolis
WOMEN'S GYMNASTICS
Mar. I vs. Illinois State, at Normal, IIL
MEN'S SWIMMING
Mar. 6-8 BIG TEN CHAMPIONSHIPS
WOMEN'S SWIMMING
Feb. 28, 29-Mar. 1 Big Ten Champio5
ships, at East Lansing
MEN'S HOCKEY
Feb. 29 vs. Michigan State, at East
Lansing
Mar. 1 MICHIGAN STATE

Fresh out of the Seabees,
I sought out some.top-flight
engineers who knew their
disciplines, and would share their
knowledge. And weren't afraid to
see newcomers take hold and
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I found what I wanted here at
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But what looked like alearning
experience has turned into a career,
with a lot of responsibility. Like in
1963, when I helped build Cowans

hydro generation for our system
and impound Lake Norman, with
its 550-mile shoreline. It's the
cooling pond for Plant Marshall,
our world-beating, high-efficiency
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You can discover career
excitement here, too. With
competitive salaries, great
benefits, a fine cultural calendar
and continuing education
opportunities at major colleges and

year-round golf and tennis. Or
fishing for the big ones (in Lake
Norman, of course).
Want to know more? Tell me
what you're after, and enclose a
copy of your resume and transcript.
Write to me at Duke Power
Company, P O. Box 33189,
Charlotte, North Carolina 28242.
~J~e ~'L

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