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February 26, 1980 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-02-26

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a

Loeb says what he means

Against on unfair low that makes young Americans second
class citizens. JOIN THE MOVEMENT TO
LOWER THE DRINKING AGE
Organizational Meeting'
TUesd[ay, Februar 26, 1980
Mchigan Union nf. Rm. 4
7.00 M
Ann Arbor Citizens for a Fair Drinking Age: REP. PERRY BULLARD-Chairman
KIM WHEELER-Directer 665-1284
" J. P. ADAMS-MSA Coordinator 763-3241

By MICHAEL ARKUSH
Special to The Daily
PRIDES CROSSING, Mass. - Ed
Muskie hates him. Gerald Ford hates
him. Phil Crane hates him. He would
probably make any Democrat's list of
ten people not to invite for dinner. He's
that unpopular.
He's William Loeb, the 75-year-old
millionaire publisher of the Manchester
Union-Leader, New Hampshire's most
widely read and controversial
newspaper. Since 1946, when he bought
the paper, Loeb has crusaded against
"naive liberals" polluting the country,
and exploited his journalistic outlet to
spread his conservative doctrine.
In every general election since 1952 -
the first year New Hampshire achieved
popular recognition as the nation's
initial presidential test - Loeb has not
hesitated to destroy the political
reputations of White House hopefuls.,
EVERY FOUR years during the
weeks before the primary, his cam-
paign escalates. Front page editorials
appear daily, the accusations are often
vicious, and counter-charges become
bitter.
As expected, he has piled up a long
list of enemies.
It was Loeb's stories about Muskie's
wife telling ethnic jokes that may have

effectively ended the front-runner's
campaign for the Democratic
nomination in 1972.
It was Loeb whose continual attacks
on President Ford's wile Betty and her
alcoholic problems which may have
tightened the gap between the president
and Ronald Reagan, Loeb's personal
favorite in 1976.
And it was Loeb who most recently
portrayed Illinois Representative
Philip Crane's wife as a social
delinquent, and accused him of being a
"well-known womanizer" in the
Washington community.
THESE THREE cases are just a
sample. Local politicians and jour-
nalists have seen Loeb's crusades at-
tack senatorial and gubernatorial can-
didates for the last three decades, and
are outraged.
But Loeb is undaunted by the
criticism. In fact, could care less.
"The difference between me and
'them (other journalists) is that I'm at

least honest. I tell voters where I'm
coming from. These journalists say
they're objective, but they're just as
biased in other ways," he said in a
recent interview.
Loeb does admit that he believes he is
"more impolite than I'd like to be," but,
says it's necessary to stir up some in-
tensity among an otherwise largely
apathetic audience.
HE SEES New Hampshire voters, as
well as the entire nation, addicted to
campaign styles and personalities
neglecting the fundamental policy dif-
ferences among the candidates; That is
why, he says, the natiqn has elected a
succession of liberal leaders in the
White House and Congress "who have
pushed the nation into inflation and
ruined our credibility around the
world."
"I'm trying to shake them up (the
voters) so that they'll realize what the
candidates stand for, and that they'll
think about these things," Loeb said.

Politicians don't like
him; he doesn't care

And then, as if he senses a possible
contradiction, he quickly adds that a
candidates' personal life "tells us a o
about how he would react to toug
national decisions."
He admits he is a conservative, but he
says that's not bad. Without hesitation
or provocation, he points his finger a
the liberals.
"I TELL YOU, I'm whata liberal
used to be. I care about the most people
having the best life. I reject the idea
that.the government can dictate to the
people what they should do, and whai
they should pay," he said angrily. I
What does William Loeb see as the
vision or future of America?
"I see a strong nation coming back to
show the world what it can do. I see a
country that can stand on its feet finan-
cially, where producers are back to
work, and consumers satisfied," he
says.
William Loeb likes to eat, drink, and
breathe America. His mansion in this
coastal town is enveloped in Americ4
Flags, seals,,paintings, portraits of
Teddy Roosevelt are everywhere.
And Loeb will continue his march un-
til he believes the greatness of America
is restored.

.3

N.H. won
(Continued from Page 1) - '
also expected to do well there. His
supporters hope that some victories in
New England, coupled with strong
finishes in the South, will pave the way
for his nomination and a victory party
at the Republican convention in
Detroit.
Should either candidate lose to the,
other by a substantial margin,
however, the effect could be severely
damaging.
Tennessee Senator Howard Baker
and Rep. John Anderson of Illinois have
both ruled out finishing first or second
in New Hampshire. Both will be content
with third place, but a fourth place loss
could be devastating for either
candidate's presidential ambitions.
REP. PHIL CRANE, another Illinois
Republican, says he does not expect a
victory here, which is a realistic
prediction considering his name rarely
shows up on any polls. Crane's goal,
according to his campaign manager
Jack Stewart, is to show continued
momentum and add to his six per cent
showing in Iowa's caucuses.
For Senator Robert Dole of Kansas, a
win in New Hampshire is neither
crucial nor very likely. Dole had been
considered likely to drop out of the race
after this primary, and some friends in
Kansas have been encouraging him to
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE
PROGRAM presents
FACETS PERFORMANCE
ENSEMBLE'S
DARK
SOLSTICE
THURSDAY, FEB. 28,
8 PM - POWER CENTER
Tickets at PTP in League
CALL 764-0450

't kill any campaigns
do so, so he can concentrate on his race moves to the Midwest, his home
Senate reelection campaign. court.
Before all the rumors of Dole's The other candidate who will take a
withdrdawing from the race, his New Hampshire loss in stride is John
Connally, the former Texas governor
strategy had been to keep a low profile and Nixon secretary.
in the early primaries and wait until the
-J Y
'Brown offN.. ballot;
signatures ruled invalid
ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) - California those signatures, leaving him with
Gov. Edmund Brown Jr. was dumped fewer than the required 10,000 valid
yesterday from the March 25 presiden- signatures.
tial primary ballot in New York state Thomas Wilkey, a spokesman for the,
after a ruling that nearly two-thirds of bipartisan board, said most of those in-
his petition signatures were invalid. validated were not registered voters or
The action by the state Board of Elec- were not enrolled Democrats.
tions came at the request of supporters HARVEY LIPPMAN, an attorney for
of Sen. Edward Kennedy (D-Mass.), Brown, said .the enrollment lists used
who had feared that Brown would by the board were outdated. Lippman
siphon away New York voters who op- said he hopes to be able to prove that
pose President Carter's re-election. most of those who signed Brown's
The decision could be a serious blow peition are registered Democrats.
to Brown's candidacy, denying him any Left on the ballot would be Carter,
shot at a share of New York's 282 Kennedy and an "uncommitted" line
delegate votes at the Democratic apparently backed by supporters of
National Convention in August. But hid Lyndon LaRouche, theU.S. Labor Par-
campaign organization said it alreadiy tycandidate.r
had appealed the decision to the state The deadline for filing petitions has
Supreme Court. passed.
STATE LAW requires 10,000 Although Brown had not been expec-
signatures from enrolled Democrats to ted to win the New York primary, he
get on the primary ballot. Brown had could have picked up a number of
submitted petitions with 15,404 delegates with even a small portion of
signatures. the vote. State law requires that
But the board said after scrutinizing delegates be committed proportionate
Brown's petitions, it invalidated 9,728 of to the popular vote in the primary.
Reye 's snydrome, flu
close 6 school districts,

Carter:
aEconomy
at1'c risis
stage'*
WASHINGTON *'(AP) - Reflect-
ing growing concern over the
nation's worsening inflation rate,
President Carter said yesterday that
inflation and the nation's energy#
supply have reached "the. crisis
stage."
"Domestically, the most
significant challenge I face is a high
inflation rate," Carter told a group
of editors at the White House.
The president said he attributes
inflation to. "a major degree to the'
fact that after all these years, we
still do not have a comprehensive
energy policy.
"AND EVEN after we have
reached a crisis stage in energy
supplies and inflation, the three
major bills thaftwill helb resolve the
issue still languish in congressional
conference committees," he said.
Carter may have elaborated on his
remarks during his talk with editors,
butwreporters were allowed to attend
only for a few minutes at the begin-
ning of the meeting.
Meanwhile, White House press
secretary Jody Powell said the ad-
ministration is unlikely to announce
any new economic policies this week
to combat inflation.
EARLIER, THE chairman of the
Federal Reserve . Board Paul
Volcker, called for "an aggressive
national effort" to combat inflation,
but said wage and price controls are
not the answer.
"We have reached the point in this
inflationary situation where decisive
action is necessary," he told the
Senate Banking Committee. He said
inflation is likely to get even worse
in months ahead and urged that the
government trim spending as one
way of improving the outlook.
He also said he would favor a 50-
cent per gallon tax on gasoline which
is opposed by the Carter ad-
ministration.

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4
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" 7

at
THE PUNCH AND JUDY THEATER
21 Kercheval (between Codieux and Moross)
Grosse Pointe Farms 48236

Info: Call 881-2621 or 881-2618

From AP and UPI
BATTLE CREEK, Mich.-Worried
by a flu outbreak and the sometimes
fatal Reye's syndrome, officials called
off classes yesterday for more than
12,000 children in six southern Michigan
school districts. Meanwhile, three more
cases of the mysterious syndrome were
reported at two hospitals.
The latest cases reported yesterday
were two children in critical condition
at the University's C.S. Mott Children's
Hospital, and one child hospitalized in
Hillsdale, a community about 40 miles
from Battle Creek. The two children at

Mott. are from eastern Michigan, but
their hometowns or identities were not
released. The identity of the child in
Hillsdale also was not given.
No classes were planned for today in
public elementary schools and junior
high schools in the six districts, and
parochial elementary and junior high
schools were closed in Battle Creek..
Public health officials have said they
do not know the cause of Reye's
syndrome, but they believe it is not
contagious. The disease affects
children aged 5 to 11 for the most part,
usually as they seem to lbe recovering
from a virus.

p

x

Now Playing at Butterfield Theatres

F'.

WEDNESDAY IS
"BARGAIN DAY"
$1.50 UNTIL 5:30
EXCEPT WAYSIDE.

ADULTS FRI. SAT. SUN.
EVE & HOLIDAYS $3 .0
MON THRU THURS.
EVENINGS $3.00
MATINEES UNTIL 530
EXCEPT HOLIDAYS ..$2.50
CHILDREN 14 &~UNDER . . $1 50

MONDAY NIGHT S
"GUEST NIGHT"
STwo Adults Admitted
For $3.00
EXCEPT WAYSIDE

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A NIGHT OF CELTIC
MYTH AND MAGIC

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Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri at 7:30, 9:1:i
Wed, Sat, Sun at
1:00 3:00,5:00.7:00 9:15

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IT'S WET
IT'S HEREI!
(R)

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THURSDAY

Tue, Thur, 7 & 8
Wed. 1-$-5-7-9

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Tues, Thurs. at 7:00, 9:15
Wed. at 1:00-3:00-5:00-7:00-9:15

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Wed, Sat, Sun at3
1:05, 3:05, 5:05, 7:05, 9:30
State
231 S. State-662-6

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Ann Arbor
CH 14 8pm

6264-662-5296

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