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February 24, 1980 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-02-24

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The Michigan Daily-Sunday, February 24, 1980-Page 3

Public issues, gov't jobs attract
,students to 'U' graduate program

By MARGARET CONE
Few academic programs offer job
market security on a par with the
Institute of Public Policy Studies
(IPPS).
Graduate students in IPPS are
trained to work in public
administration positions and make
necessary changes in government
olicy.
IPPS "focuses on training
professional government officers,
according to Director Edward
Gramlich.
THE "PROFESSIONAL style
masters degree" program was
developed because "the government is
big and demanding. These students are
in demand," IPPS Prof. Jack Walker
said.
Originally, the program began in 1914
s the Institute of Public
Administration. To meet the needs of,
expanding government, the program)
was reorganized in 1968 to provide
interdisciplinary education in
economics, political science, industrial
engineering, and law.
The graduate program has nearly a
100 per cent placement record for its
graduates, Gramlich said. Graduates

might work in the Federal Government
at the Office of Management and
Budget or in a position as city manager
in a local government.
"The job opportunities are very good,
they love to hire Michigan grads in
Washington," said Rick Lancaster, a
second-year student. "We pull down
around $16,000 to $18,000 (a year)," he
said, adding, "people aren't in the
program for money."
THE STUDENTS and the professors
express a concern with public issues
and a dedication to improving the
quality of public life. "There's a feeling
in the program that if there was a
better analysis, if it got listened to, the
programs (government policies) could
meet the public interest. .. that's why
they aren't in Bus. Ad. (Business
Administration)," said Nancy Berla,
IPPS assistant director for student
affairs.
In contrast to graduate programs in
economics or political science, IPPS
focuses on practical application of
theory. IPPS students analyze present
government policies such as the Detroit
Amtrak system.
During mandatory summer
internships, the students must face and

deal with the inherent problems in
government bureaucracy and the
personal interactions in government
work.
"We use the economic and political
tools in an actual situation. We are
more professionally oriented . . . the
program trains us to go out of the
classroom and into the real situation,"
commented Paula Casson, a first-year
student.
CASSON ADDED, "In an academic
atmosphere you leach a certain point
... different things will go on in the real
world that you can't get in a
classroom."
Prof. Walker explained the program
"encourages and facilitates movement
from the University to the government
and likewise, the government to the
University."
The students emphasized the
optimistic and pragmatic ambience of
the program. IPPS is different from
other graduate programs in which
candidates write theses, vie for faculty
attention, and take oral exams.
"The students are supportive. . . the
attitude is different," remarked
Lancaster. "The professors have us
call them by their first names, which

makes a big difference. We feel closer
to being a peer."
THE FACULTY members, many of
whom have worked in Washington, are
working on research projects funded by
governmental agencies. Current topics
include a survey of citizen's attitude
towards tax limitation proposals, the
truth content in Soviet press releases,
and the economic feasibility of a solid
waste trash shredding facility for Ann
Arbor.
The IPPS faculty say the program is
'intellectually alive," and it serves "a
social need." The best part of the
program, Gramlich emphasized, is
"taking bright students and sending
them out there to do something. If an
important decision gets made, I want
them to know economics, political
science, and statistics before they
make them."
At the institute, "You do the
research, write it in the journals, and
you hope it makes an impact,"
Gramlich said.
"We're just getting started," he
added. "Ultimately, a place like this
will rise or fall with it's students."

,-ro_

'I

lll- J'

Nuke issue comes alive in N.H.: Kennedy's
ambiguous remarks criticized by Brown

with special guest
J D SOUTHER
March 22 8pm
Hill Auditorium
Tickets are $8.50, 7.50 and 6.50 and go on sale Monday, February 25, at the
Michigan Union Box Office, 10 am, Where House Records and Huckleberry
Party Store. For more information call 763-2071. Sorry, no checks.

By KEITH RICHBURG
Special 10 The Daily
HANOVER, N.H. - Nuclear power opponents are
emerging as a potentially pivotal force in New Ham-
hire's upcoming primary election and President
'arter's two Democratic challengers are actively
cultivating the anti-nuclear vote.
They are mostly young, mostly students, from Dar-
tmouth and the University of New Hampshire, and
they are frequently opposed to nuclear power as an
alternative even in this energy-poor New England
state. Students do not represent a sizable vote here,
but they do have the potential to work tirelessly for a
candidate on election day, making telephone calls,
canvassing, and knocking on doors.
THE NUCLEAR POWER opponents are almost
Overwhelmingly supporting California Gov. Edmund
Brown, Jr. who has exploited his own anti-nuclear
stand to the hilt. Brown's campaign posters here
show the governor addressing the crowd at the
Washington D.C. "No Nukes" rally last May.

Brown tells his audiences that he has been an op-
ponent of nuclear power longer than Massachusetts
Senator Edward Kennedy, whom he accuses of
''making anti-nuclearnnoise" while deliberately
fudging his position.
Brown has challenged Kennedy to a debate on
nuclear power, but so far Kennedy has ignored him.
Kennedy, spurred by Brown's stronger-than-
expected 15 per cent showing in Maine's precinct
caucuses two weeks ago, is moving to project himself
as an equally adamant opponent of nuclear power
who is more electable than Brown.
KENNEDY HAS consistently stated that he favors
a moratorium on the construction of. any new nuclear
power plants. But on Wednesday, at an energy forum
in Concord, Kennedy indicated a significant shift to a
more adamant anti-nuclear position.
In answer to a question from Harvey Wasserman, a
former University student, now heading the Cam-
paign for Safe Energy here, Kennedy said "yes," he
would support a moratorium on the licensing of any

nuclear power plants that have already been built.
But Kennedy's answer was sufficiently garbled in
misplaced syntax to leave his real nuclear power
position ambiguous. Later, the Kennedy staff said the
Senator stood by his previous position - that he sup-
ports only a moratorium on new plant construction -
and there had not been any shift.
Some political observers here attributed Kennedy's
apparent shift - then his backing away - to fatigue
and the distraction of the polls showing him still
trailing Carter by 18 percentage points.
BUT BROWN SAID the Kennedy misstatement
was a calculated attempt to cut into some of the anti-
nuclear power vote supporting the Brown candidacy.
In Walpole, N.H. Brown said Kennedy was being
"deceptively ambiguous" in his position in an effort
to fog the nuclear issue. "He is attempting to create a
false impression that he flatly opposes further licen-
sing of nuclear power plants," Brown said.
Brown has consistently attacked power plants with
a vigor in California where he has fought the con-
struction and operation of nuclear facilities.

I

Now Playing at Butterfield Theatres

WEDNESDAY IS
"'BARGAIN DAY"
$1 .50 UNTIL 5:30
EXCEPT WAYSIDE

ADULTS FRI SAT. SGN
EVE & HOLIDAYS $3.50
MON. THRU THURS.
EVENINGS, . . $300
MATINEES UNTIL 5:30
EXCEPT HOLIDAYSR $250
CHILDREN 14 & UNDER ..$1.50

MONDAY NIGHT IS
"GUEST NIGHT"
Two Adults Admitted
for $3.00
EXCEPT WAYSIDE

I

L

II

Raoul Walsh's

1941

MAN POWER
EDWARD G+ ROBINSON plays an electric-line repairman who falls for a
clip-joint hostess-a woman with quite a sordid past-only to watch her shift
her attentions to his best friend, played by GEORGE RAFT. The Woman?
None other than the lovely MARLENE DIETRICH, the heart-breaker of heart-
breakers. Short: BIG BOOBS & BATHING BEAUTIES.
Mon.: SALT OF THE EARTH (at 7 & 9:05)
Tues.: LA JETTE & THE LOST WORLD (free at 7 & 9:05)
Wed.: PROGRAM OF AMERICAN AVANT-GARDE FILM (tonight at 7 & 9:05)

Campus
1214 S. Unive ity 668-6416
Mn TuesThurs, Fri at 7:30, 9:15
1:00, 3:00, 5:00, 7:00. 9:15

IT'S COLD
IT'S WET
IT'S HERE!!
(R)

I1

I

AO

Wa~i de
302O0 htenow 434-1782
Mon, Tue, Thur Fri7 & 9
Sat, Sun, Wed 1-3-5-7-9
Wed adults $1.50 until 2:00

SUNDAY
FILMS

r

CINEMA GUILD

TONIGHT AT
7:00 and 9:05

OLD ARCH. AUD.
$1.50

Cinema Two-Ninotchka, 7, 9 p.m., Aud. A, Angell.
Cinema Guild-Manpower, 9:05 p.m., Old Arch. Aud.
Recreation Center-Tale of Two Critters, 10 a.m., Washtenaw and
Hogback.
MEETINGS
Hiking Club-Meet Rackham Bldg., N.W. entry on E. Huron, 1:30 p.m.
Housing Division-"Blackness in the '80s , . . A Dream Deferred?"
Discussion and Drama: Career Progressions, 7:30 p.m., Dining Room No. 4,
South Quad.
Guild House-Gay Discussion Group, 6:00 p.m., 802 Monroe
Kennedy Campaign-Organizational meeting: 1 p.m., Lawyer's Club.
SPEAKERS
WUOM-Karol King, V.P., Texaco Corp., "Responsibilities of Corporate
Media and Public Relations," 1:30 p.m.
PERFORMANCES
Pendleton Arts Center-"A Tempo Recital": 6 p.m., 2nd floor, Union.
School of Music-Trombone Students Recital, 2 p.m.; Viola Students
Recital, 4 p.m.; Choral Conduction Recital, 6 p.m.: Recital Hall.
PTP Guest Artist Series-"Eden," 2 p.m., Power Center.
Canterbury Loft-Sunday Afternoon Music, chamber music, 4 p.m.;
"Waiting for Godot,"2 p.m. only: 322 S. State.
MISCELLANEOUS
Hillel-Lox and bagel brunch, 11 a.m.; Israeli dancing, 1 p.m.; Deli,
6 p.m., 1429 Hill St.
Center for Afroamerican and African Studies-Tribute to Robert
Hayden, University Prof., Poet and Library of Congress Poetry Cohsultant,
3 p.m., Cady Rm., Stearns Bldg., School of Music.
Rec. Sports-Family Program, folk dance workshop, 4 p.m., NCRB.
University Musical Society-Founders Day, 4 p.m., Hill Aud.
WUOM-"What Makes a Good Teacher; ": 1 p.m.
MONDAY
FILMS
Wesley Foundation-Fighting For Our Lives, 12:10 p.m., Pine Room,
602 E. Huron.
Residential College-The Tooth of Crime, 9 p.m., Rm. 126, E. Quad.
Cinema Guild-Salt of the Earth, 7, 9:05 p.m., Old Arch. Aud.
AAFC-House of Bamboo, 7 p.m.; Pickup on South Street, 8:45 p.m.:
Aud. A, Angell.
MEETINGS
Committee for the Citizens Party-Membership meeting, 9 p.m., Mich.
League, Rm. C.

JOH
ANN

CAPTAIN
N RIrU AVENGER
E ARCHER MAKES
DUST
BUST!!
HELP
IS rim

SISSY SPACEK
JOHN HEARD
Nick
Nolte

t

THEar l
WAY.
PG , MGM
More TUes, Thurs, Fri at 7:05, 9:30 Mon Tues, Thurs, Fri at 7:00 9 15
Wed, Sat, Sun at Wed, Sat Sun at
1:05, 3:05, 5:05, 7:05, 9:30 1:00 3:00,5:00,7:00,9:15
State 1.2.3*4.
231 S. State-662-6264-662-5296
Mon, Tues, Thurs Fri at 7:00, 9:15 FOR FRIDAY ONLY
Wed, Sat, Sun at Tonight at7:05 Only
1:00, 3: 5:00, 7:00, 9:15 Sat & Sun at 1:05-3:05-5:05-7:05-
GEORGE SEGAL - NATAIE WOODm

i

I

1

that fools around a lot!
MARRIED
h UPLE
K~,4n i4RZ

I

I

lO
ORs

Quit complaining.
Take a
Daily break

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