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February 21, 1980 - Image 10

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-02-21

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Page 10--Thursday, February 21, 1980-The Michigan Daily
Liberal Anderson faltering in New Hampshire
w U ' ┬░ss

By MICHAEL ARKUSH
A Daily news analysis
MANCHESTER, N.H. - On trial before a
hostile jury of New Hampshire owners a few
days ago, the candidate brushed aside the path
of political wisdom and told the crowd exactly
what they did not want to hear.
"I would like a system for the state to screen
those who want to own an upright handgun," he
said calmly.
This courageous stance before one of the
state's most powerful special interest groups in-
spired little sympathy, as the audience - almost
spontaneously - shouted, booed, hissed, and
screamed. Some even urged him to leave the
auditorium
FOR THOSE unfamiliar with Rep. John An-
derson (R-Ill.), this scene may seem unusual in
the American political trdition in which most
presidential candidates tailor their views to suit
the particular audience.
But while Jerry Brown may have jumped onto
the Proposition 13 bandwagon and Howard

Baker is accused of playing presidential politics
with SALT II, this youthful-looking 10-term
congressman tells it like he thinks it is - no mat-
ter how it may affect the polls.
And while his bravery may permanently doom
his chances to occupy the Oval Office, Anderson
appears quite satisfied, if not enthusiastic, with
his unique campaign style. He might even thrive
on it.
"WHAT MAKES me different is that I'll tell
you what the harsh reality of this nation is, and I
won't make promises that can't be kept," he
says proudly.
"I'm different than the other Republicans."
No one can dispute that.
WHILE THE other six Republican hopefuls
emphatically endorse drastic hikes in the defen-
se budget, the fifty-eight-year-old representative
says he wants to cut it.
His opponents have gone to extreme lengths to
defend the role of nuclear power in the country's
future energy supply, but Anderson prefers the
development of solar energy and other alter-

natives to establish independence from foreign
oil imports.
"Six of the seven Republican candidates offer
the same solutions in the traditional hard-line
terms. They say we have to cut the_ federal
deficit, raise the defense budget, and still
provide for the social and welfare needs of our
people, They didn't explain how such miracles
can be made," he said.
SINCE HIS quest for the presidency began last
summer, Anderson has stressed his proposal to
institute a 50 cent per gallon gasoline tax to force
a quick reduction in domestic oil consumption
because the recent voluntary conservation
methods have failed. He adds that the poor and
unemployed will not suffer under this tax
because there would be a supplementary fifty
per cent slash in Social Security taxes.
"The American people must make the
sacrifice. OPEC will continue to tax us if we
don't tax ourselves," he insists.
As a new wave of Cold War-like apprehension
spreads through the country - prompting his

opponents to toughen their anti-Soviet rhetoric -
Anderson still calls for the reduction of strategic
arms, and says America's views should not
committed to a war in the Persian Gulf to defenW
our oil imports. Instead, he asserts, the nation
must make "internalsacrifices."
HIS LOCAL opposition to draft registration
spurred a significant amount of student support
in New Hampshire. More than five hundred
students attended Anderson's speech Tuesday
night at Dartmouth and cheered when he told
them they wouldn't go to war for barrels of oil.
The student newspaper recently endorsed his
candidacy.
These stances, making Anderson an enigma i
the current mainstream of Republican can-
didates and voters, paint a gloorhy picture for his
future campaign prospects. Though his
popularity has risen - especially since a for-
midable showing in the Iowa debate last month
- he still fares well behind the* party's
heavyweights, Reagan and Baker.

Anderson
b . GOP liberal

1 \
i '
1 d

AL TERS CAMPAIGN S TRA TEGY
Conservative Crane also

DICK

GREGORY

A
UAC VIEWPOINT/ALPHA PHI ALPHA
P PRESENTATION
February 22:

By KEITH RICHBURG
A Daily news analysis
MANCHESTER, N. H. - His blue
and gold bumper stickers proclaim him
"the early bird," but by all indications,
Rep. Philip Crane's presidential can-
didacy is about to get shot down over
the snow-capped mountains of New
Hampshire next week.
He shows barely above three percen-
tage points in most of the polls here,
and his campaign stops around the
state draw only a few dozen curious
spectators. Moreover, in a Gallup sur-

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vey of 570 registered Republicans,
Crane's latest approval rating was only
10 per cent; 76 per cent of those polled
did not even know who he was.
But none of that deters Crane, a con-
servative Illinois Republican who
began his presidential campaign exac-
tly 567 days ago as a younger,
ideologically purer Ronald Reagan.
WHEN CRANE announced his can-
didacy the summer of 1978, he said that
Reagan's presidential ambitions were
still uncertain. Should Reagan not enter
the race, Crane said, he wanted to have
an ,early start so he could inherit the
Republican right and pick up the man-
tle of conservatism.
But now Reagan is indeed in the race,
and is considered locked in a struggle
for first place with former U.N. AM-
bassador George Bush. Crane has.since
been forced to reassess his campaign
strategy.
The Crane strategy now is to let
. George Bush puncture holes in
Reagan's myths of invincibility, and
once Reagan is knocked out of the race,
to offer himself as heir apparent to
Reagan's wing of the party.
EXPLAINING THE strategy of tur-
ning his scant 6.7 per cent showing in
Iowa's precinct caucuses into the
Republican party nomination, Crane
sounds self-confident. One of the
assumptions when his campaign first
began, Crane said, "was that Ronald
Reagan would prove not to be ten feet

tall. As he was proven vulnerable and
his vulnerability showed, we would be
in the best position."
Indeed, should Reagan's latest
presidential drive falter early - which
is at best a premature prediction -
Crane could have the right end of the
political spectrum all to himself, being
the only other die-hard conservative
among the six remaining Republican
candidates. Crane, in fact, often makes
Reagan look progressive by com-
parison.
TTHE PRODUCT of a south side
Chicago Depression family, Crane
inherited his conservatism from his
father, who made family dinners a
forum for indoctrinating the five Crane
children in his conservative ways.
Crane sees Reagan, his conservative
political mentor, as drifting to the left
and has offered himself to his party's
true believers as Reagan's rightful
heir. But his candidacy has so far
seemed only to divide the right wing,
leading some party stalwarts to suggest
he withdraw.
At the Iowa precinct caucuses,
Reagan could have defeated winner
George Bush if he had the Crane sup-
port. And at a national conservative
conference earlier this month, two con-
servative House Republicans said that,

failing"
their wing of the GOP could no longer
support both Reagan and Crane.
Crane, however, doesn't see it that
way. He said, "We won't be chased off,
even if we lose New Hampshire"
which he will probably do if the polls
and public opinion are any indication

Crane
... still confident

A woman attacked
near Michigan Union

THE LEADING NEWSMAGAZINE
AT THE LOWEST PRICE.

BY WILLIAM THOMPSON
An unidentified person thwarted the
attempted abduction of an 18-year-od
woman outside the Michigan Union
early Tuesday morning, police said
yesterday.
The woman was walking home near
the Regents Plaza at 1:46 a.m. when
two men in a car asked for directions,
according to Ann Arbor police
spokesman Harold Tinsey. When the
woman approached the car, one of the

men got out and demanded money. __
THE WOMAN refused, and theW
tacker grabbed her and tried to force
her into the car, Tinsey said.
"She began fighting and screamingh"
Tinsey said. "By the time he had her
halfway in the car, the woman and her
attacker noticed that someone was
coming to her aid.'
The man who broke off the attempt
had heard the screming, said Tinsey,
"but nobody has identified who that
.person was."
WHEN THE assailant saw the ap-
proaching person, he returned to his
car and drove away on Union Drive,
according to Leo Heatley of the Univer-
sity Department of Safety. Two cab
drivers who had parked in front oJ the
Union were also approaching the at-
tacker when he fled, Heatley said.
According to Tinsey, the assailant,
who is still being sought, was described
as about 30 years old, heavy-set and
muscular, end well dressed
groomed. The other man remained
the car, said Tinsey, and "didn't do
much of anything."

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