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January 13, 1980 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-01-13

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The Michiqan Daily-Sunday, January 13, 1980-Page 5
United States*Iran.Afghanlstan Comparison
\ Iran Afghan
Population:
33.590.000
636.363 Sq. Miles con ct
Armed Forces:
342,000
Crude Oil Reserves:
62.0 Billion Bbls.
Per Capita Arable Land.
1.1 Acres j
Afghanistan (Continued from Page 1)
Population:
P20a340.000 the Afghan regime.
A2ea: -M sDEFENDING THE Soviet actions,
253.861 Sq. Miles UBrezhnev accused the United State sand
Armed Forces: "its accomplices" of having launched
110,000 an "undeclared war" agains
SCrude Oil Reserves: Afghanistan, sending "thousands and
284 Million Bbls.inugtsare
tens of thousands of insurgents, armed
Per Capita Arable Land: and trained abroad" into the country.
United States
Population: "The unceasing armed intervention,
216.820.000 the well-advanced plot by external for-
Area ces of reaction created a real threat
3.675.630 Sq. Miles that Afghanistan would lose its in-
Arred Forces: dependence and be.turned into an im-
2.088.000 perialist military bridgehead on our
Crude Oil Reserves country's southern border," Brezhnev
29.5 Billion Bbls.sad
Per Capta Arabe e Land: Source: World Almanac 197778 Figures snnd.
2.1 Acre

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Western analysts disagree on
theories behind Afghan invasion

(Continued from Page 1)
*jd his aides with a lineup headed by
akrak Karmal. Amin was executed.
THE FIRST SOVIET soldiers-from
the elite 105th Airborne and 306th
Motorized Rifle divisions-have since
been joined by as many as 100,000
others, and many Afghans fear they are
in their central Asian nation to stay.
The sudden removal of Amin, who
was as pro-Soviet as-any recent Afghan
leader, surprised diplomats here,
ignited debate about the Kremlin's
ng-term intentions and caused new
"oncerns throughout the region.
The Soviet military, intervention has
removed what Pakistan, Afghanistan's
neighbor to the south and east, con-
siders an important "buffer." It also
has left much of Iran, at Afghanistan's
western border, within striking distan-
ce of the Soviet forces.
SOME WESTERN and;. Asian
analysts believe the number of soldiers
*,.d the, sophisticated equipment the
oviets sent into Afghanistan is con-
siderably greater than what was
'needed to put down Moslem Afghan
rebels who have been fighting a suc-
cession of three Marxist governments
for 20 months.
Other analysts believe the Soviets are
simply determined to put an end to the
rebellion as quickly as possible and
have no designs on either Pakistan pr
Iran.
History offers conflicting clues to the
,0viet motives.
THE SEARCH for warm-water ports
was a key foreign policy consideration
for leaders of 19th century Czarist
Russia. Intervention in central Asian

nations, like the current Soviet inter-
vention in Afghanistan, was part of the
Russians' design.
But one Asian diplomat here said,
"Instead of a warm water port, it could
be oil or the creation of a sphere of in-
fluence over the entire 'Indian subcon-
tinent."'
Still others think the stakes are dif-
ferent in the geopolitical "Great
Game"-the term author Rudyard
Kipling used.
RUSSIA HISTORICALLY has been
open to invasion from both east and

west, and has long sought to establish a
bulwark of friendly states around its
borders. Furthermore, some analysts
say, the Moslem religious overtone of
the Afghan anti-communist
rebellion-coming behind Iran's
Islamic revolution-may worry the
Soviet Union about the susceptibility of
its own large Moslem population to the
trend.
The Soviets and Afghans also claim
the intervention was necessary to halt
alleged U.S. and Chinese subversive ac-
tivities here.

. . . to ave acted otnerwise would
have meant leaving Afghanistan a prey
to imperialism . . . to act otherwise
would have meant to watch passively
the origination on our southern border
of a serious danger to the security of the
Soviet state."
A STATEMENT issued by Afghan
rebel supporters in Islamabad said the
rebels scored victories in Nuristan,
Badakhshan and Takhar provinces and
were now in control of all three.
The statement said, "The Soviet
Union, which is a superpower, cannot
subjugate the Islamic people of
Afghanistan, even if it commits its en-
tire military might in Afghanistan."
Neither the newspaper report nor the
rebel claims could be independently
confirmed.

Sunday, January 2
8:00 p.m. t a
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Iran threatens to boycott U.S .partners

I

(Continued from Page 1)
ranking religious leader. Violence
broke out in Azerbaijan last month af-
ter Shariat-Madari criticized the
Islamic constitution for concentrating
too much power in Khomeini's hands.
In other developments :
The deputy minister of national
guidance, Mehdi Momken, said U.S.,
British and West German reporters had
failed to give an accurate picture of the
first year of the Iranian revolution and
the nation should "shut the doors" to
them. The CBS and NBC networks
already have been forbidden to use
Iranian facilities for transmitting their
reports and as a result must ship film
out of Iran.
* A Pakistani newspaper said
Khomeini soon would announce that the
hostages might be released by Jan. 20.
Although the paper, the Urdu-language
daily Jang of Rawalpindi, quoted

"highly informed sources," there was
no way to verify the reliability of the
report.
Members of Khomeini's special
negotiating team to troubled Kurdistan
province in western Iran announced
they would resume talks Sunday with
Kurdish dissidents in the city of
Mahabad. ThehKurds seek greater
autonomy for their region. Kurdish
dissidents were in the 11th day of a sit-
in in the most important mosque in
Sanandaj sand the governor-general's
office to demand that the revolutionary
guard pull out of the city.
* Almost all 103 candidates intending
to run for president in Iran's Jan. 25
elections have been judged unqualified.
Interior Minister Rashemi Rafsanjani
said. Ninety candidates had been
denied the right to advertise on state-
owned television and radio, he said, ad-
ding that most candidates were "ab-

solutely unqualified and in some cases
lunatics."
" Former Prime Minister Shahpour
Bakhtiar, who during his exile in Fran-.
ce has been trying to put together an
opposition Iranian government, was
quoted by Agence France-Presse as
saying he would return to Iran to give
"the final blow" to Khomeini.

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HEBREW FOR BEGINNERS . . .

INTERMEDIATE HEBREW

. . . .

.

. . . . Mon. & Wed. 7:00-8:30 p.m.
. . . . Mon. & Thurs. 7:00-8:30 p.m.
. . . . Wednesdays 7:00-8:30 p.m.

ADVANCED INTERMEDIATE HEBREW
YIDDISH FOR BEGINNERS . . .
INTERMEDIATE YIDDISH.. . .
HEBREW CALLIGRAPHY . . . . .
BASIC JUDAISM . . . .
READING THE BIBLE: JONAH .
THE 48 WAYS TO WISDOM . .
TALMUD BRACHOT.. . . .
THE BOOK OF EXODUS . . . . .
AFTER AUSCHWITZ . . .
JESUS THE JEW . . . .

. Tuesdays 7:00-9:00 p.m.
. . . Thursdays 7:00-9:00 p.m.
. . . . . 5 Mondays 7:00-8:30 p.m.
. . . . . Mondays 7:00-10:00 p.m.
.. ..Mondays 8:30-10:00 p.m.
.. . Wednesdays 7:00-8:30 p.m.
. .. Tuesdays 8:30-10:00 p.m.
Tuesdays 7:00-8:30 p.m.

. .

. . . Tuesdays 7:00-8:30 p.m.

. . . 5 Tuesdays 7:30-9:30 p.m.

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