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February 20, 1980 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-02-20

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The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, February 20, 1980-Page 5

EVERY WEEK:
MONDAY: GREEK NIGHT
Frats, Sororities FREE with proper ID
Non-Greeks admitted after 11 pm with cover charge
WEDNESDAY: CRAZY DRINK NIGHT
BEER AND DRINK SPECIALS AND BANDS
THURSDAY: BIG PARTY NIGHT
FRIDAYS AND SATURDAYS:
HAPPY HOUR PRICES 8:30-9:30
FREE COVER BETWEEN 8:30-9:00
$1 COVER BETWEEN 9:00-9:30
THIS WEDNESDAY NIGHT:
PARTY WITH PHI SIGMA EPSILON
THIS THURSDAY NIGHT:
"CINEMA"
PARTY WITH LAMBDA CHI ALPHA
COMING JAN. 27, 28:
"MAGAZINE"

A NEIGHBORHOOD YOUNGSTER wields a broom outside his demolished severe wind gusts have taken 18 lives and caused an estimated $100 million
home in the San Francisco, Calif. suburb of Pacifica yesterday after the in damage. The governors of California and Arizona have declared many
latest major winter storm from the Pacific Ocean swept across Nlorthern parts of their states disaster areas.
California. Flooding and mudslides resulting from the heavy rains and

I
A A A £ A A A A A A A A h &

**
West Coast flooding claims over
8 lives, $100 million in damage

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[.T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T

Hey You;' GoodL
Allow me to introduce myself.

From the Associated Press
Mudslides and flooding spread further across Southern
California yesterday, where a week of storms had already
dumped a foot of rain and caused $100 million damage.
With at least 18 persons dead in California, thousands
neless and dams overflowing in some parts of the state,
rain fell relentlessly for a seventh day. The National Guard
was on alert.
FLOODS FROM the same storm system continued to
take their toll in Utah and Arizona.
In Phoenix, long traffic jams developed when another
bridge was closed across the flood-swollen Salt River, which
splits 'the city dovin the middle. That left only two of 10
bridges open in the metropolitan area of 1.5 million people.
California Gov. Edmund Brown Jr. cut short a
presidential campaign swing in New England to return home
, declare four more counties disaster areas, including Los
1geles County.
IN ARIZONA, Gov. Bruce Babbitt asked President
Carter on Monday night to declare much of central Arizona a
disaster area,
Brown, who said his own home in Laurel Canyon was
"like a swimming pool" on the inside, estimated the damage
in his state at $100 million.
Fashionable homes were sliding down hillsides giving
way in the rain. Roads were blocked, travelers stranded. '
Pour Michigan child
die of Reyc 's syndro

CALIFORNIA AUTHORITIES said 76 homes had been
damaged, with 27 destroyed, most of them in Los Angeles
County.
At least 4,500 persons had been evacuated or warned to
leave.
Homes in the exclusive seaside area of Malibu were
threatened by oozing mud and erosion from heavy surf,
which sent one house toppling into the ocean Sunday.
"THE MUD is up to the windowsills of one house," said
Los Angeles County sheriff's deputy Mike Santander.
A cloudburst at dawn brought down part of a hill in Stone
Canyon above the San Fernando Valley, seriously damaging
four homes and forcing the evacuation of 50 families.
"If the rain keeps coming, the hill will keep coming,"
said Pat Connelley at the Los Angeles Emergency Control
Center.
In the San Diego area, water was flowing over the tops of
a half-dozen dams for the first time in two years. Authorities
closed six state highways and 43 county roads.
In the week that saw .11.34 inches of rain fill in Los
Angeles, at least 18 persons had been killed in California with
several others missing and several injured. Three persons
were dead in Arizona and three Americans were among the
casualties m Tijuana, Mexico.
At the Point'Magu Naval Air Station 60 miles north of Los
Angeles, 550 homes were flooded, leaving 3,000 persons
homeless, and hundreds of ears were submerged.

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lam
(J~fithidiigan Flt aMli
TELEPHONE.
Cell me sometime-will ye honey?
Billing 764-0550
Circulation 764-0558
Classifieds 764-0557
Display 764-0554
News 764-0552
Sports 764-0562

*******y~k,
iok~n
r*
'**
oo~l *

" a " " " " " 1 l " t ".' " " " L" 1 -

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1~P~ ~ P~ P~

By United Press International
State health officials yesterday
reported a sudden increase in Reyes
Syndrome, saying the often-fatal
lady has stricken 18 children so far
year and taken the lives of four of
them..
At the same time, officials announced
that all Union City schools were being
closed -- including Sherwood Elemen-
tary where the deaths of two children
from Reyes triggered a boycott of the
school by parents.
STATE EPIDEMIOLOGIST Norman
Hayner said the 18 children stricken
with Reyes range in age from four mon-
ths to 14 years and live in 13 counties
*°oss Michigan.
The dead are an eight-year-old girl
from Battle Creek, a 12-year-old from

Lakeview, a seven-year-old boy from
Sterling Heights, and a seven-year-old
boy from Sherwood, he said. No names
were released.
Earlier reports listed among Reyes
victims eight-year-old Tiffany Wheeler
of Battle Creek and eight-year-old
Michael Duttlinger - a student in the
Sherwood school. Tracy Williams, 12,
who died in Battle Creek, may have
been a Reyes victim as well, doctors
said.
HAYNER SAID the incidence of
Reyes was similar to that experienced
in recent years.
He refused to confirm that the two
lists refer to the same victims, but
stressed there are only four deaths
overall.

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frequency response, wow &-4lutter, distortion
Mclean and demagnetize your tape heads
answer your questions about tape
A consultant from Nortronics will show you how to
RecrCareDis perform simply maintenance on your cassette deck.
II NORTRONICS CLINIC SPECIAL

Parsons School
of Design
Summrer in France
Parsons ineParis.7
Jne 28-August 8'1980
Summer in France-and paint on the Rive Gauche in Paris, explore prehis-
toric art in the caves of the Dordogne region, study the rich heritage of
European Art and Design.
Courses include: Painting, Drawing, French Painting from Neo-Classi-
cism to Surrealism, The Writer Among Artists, French History, French
Language, French Fashion: Its History and the Current Scene, Advanced
Studio, In Search of Paleolithic Man, and Landscape Painting.
Cost for the entire six-week program, including nine credits of studio or
liberal arts courses, round-trip airfare double occupancy accommodations
with breakfast, plus special excursions is $1975.
Photography in Arles
June 28 -July 19, 1980
For three weeks this summer, you can study the art, practice and history of1
photography in Arles, France in a program held bythe Photography Depart-
ment of Parsons School of Design and the New School in collaboration with
the esteemed French photographic association, Rencontres Internationale
de la Photographie.
The total cost for courses (six credits), transportation, room and breakfast
is $1750.
For brochures on both programs, please mail-the coupon below or call
(212)741-8953.
Parsons School of Design, 66 Fifth Avenue, NY, NY 10011, Attn: Dean Salvadori
Q Please send information on the Parsons in Paris Program for Summer, 1980.
O Please send information on the Parsons/New School Photography in Arles Program for
4 i mr~r1QU f

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