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February 19, 1980 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-02-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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CELEBRATE
GEORGE WASHING TON'S
BIRTHDA Y
at
The ttl League leCream ar
with a luscious
GORGE WASHINGTON SUNDAE
chock full of cherries
(would we lie to you?)

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Page 12-Tuesday, February 19, 1980-The Michigan Daily
Thousands how(
as storms, floods

'

ravage West Coast

01

Bring this ad and your ID and get our
GEORG E WASHINGTON SUNDAE* ($1.00)
at half price-50C
offer good Tues., Feb. 19 thru Fri., Feb. 22 between 2 and 4 pm
For all students, faculty and staff
THE MICHIGAN LEAGUE
227 S. Ingalls

From The Associated Press
A deluge in its sixth day carved away
more California hillsides and left
thousands homeless at an inundated
Navy base yesterday as "one storm
right after another" rolled in from the
Pacific.
The death toll climbed to at least 22 in
the rainstorms that began last week.
The victims included 16 in California,
three in Arizona, and three American
tourists swept away by floodwaters in
Tijuana, Mexico, just across the bor-
der.
AMONG THE latest victims were two
Burbank area residents who were killed
when a light plane crashed during a
storm Sunday night in the San Gabriel
Mountains north of Saugus, Calif. Two
other persons were seriously injured in
the crash.
With dams across the Far West full,
there was no let-up in the relentless

less

m

CAFETERIA open
11:15 am-1:15 pry
5 pm-7:15pm

THE LITTLE LEAGUE
on the lower level
open 7:15-4 pm

I

* GEORGE WASHINGTON SUNDAE:
cherry vanilla ice cream, hot fudge sauce, whipped cream, topped with
chopped cherries.

a e - - i

.

"S.P.E.R.M."-T-SHIRT
SOCIETY FOR THE PRESERVATION OF EQUAL RIGHTS FOR MEN
Sbo f3T

rainstorms in Southern California,
where mudslides and high water have
caused millions of dollars in damage.
"There's one storm right after the
other," said National Weather Seirvice
forecaster Al Bascomb. "There's so
many I can't keep track."
ABOUT 3,000 people were evacuated
for the second time in less than 24 hours
yesterday when more than 550 homes
were inundated with up to five feet of
mud and water at Point Mugu Naval
Air Station, a missile weapons test cen-
ter about 60 miles north of Los Angeles.
"Some people were just beginning to
return to their homes about midnight
when a sailor trying to tow a vehicle
from a ditch along the highway yelled
over the radio, 'Here it gomes again,' "
said base spokesman Ray Lucasey.
The wall of water left two-thirds of
the houses on the base awash and
flooded the base chapel, gymnasium,
and even some higher-elevation
barracks "within a few minutes,"
Lucasey said.
"HUNDREDS OF sailors have been
going back and forth all night in water
up to their necks bringing people and
belongings out of the flooded housing,"
Lucasey said.
Hollywood divorce attorney Marvin
Mitchelson saw his home in Hollywood
Hills left perched precariously on the
edge of a cliff created when the wet
hillside gave way and flattened another
house down the hill.
In Phoenix, only three of the ten
bridges were open across the normally
dry Salt River, which became a raging
torrent in its 20-mile run through the
metropolitan area of 1.5 million people
over the weekend.
But authorities said there were no
significant traffic problems yesterday,
partly because it was a holiday.
ABOUT 400 homes in the Phoenix
area were damaged in flooding along
with hundreds of streets and bridges.
No estimate of the damage was
available.

Il

01

-SHIRT COLORS
avy, Black, Lt. Blue
sold, Red & Green

MEN'S RIGHTS

iaa s. a -aai w .
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Daily Photo by JIM KRUZ.
Playing with trains
Jim Williams, vice-president of the Ann Arbor Model Railroad Association, toys
with a model of a Huron Valley Railroad car. About 2,000 people gathered at
Pioneer High School Sunday to see and trade model train memorabilia and
equipment. The event drew over 300 model train dealers from five states.
Ford eOxec., 'prof testify
in negligent homicide triuj

£ IR ITS Jolt
E :i .LETTER COLORS
Yellow, Black & White
Insert color & quantities
wanted in box below (use
separate sheet if necessary)
COPYRIGHT °'1980
J& A SERVICES TM
50% COTTON-50% POLYESTER
COLOR QUANTITIES
S enclose A60 for8 each.SPERM

T-Shirt ordered, plus $1.00 shipping
& handling charges for the first
shirt ordered and 254 for each addi-
tional sp lrt.

SHIRT LETTERS S M L XL PRICE

,.
k
}.
.MP
i +
C'.
.4!
W4
le
;q,
.
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c4
c-
'.

'MAKE CHECIK OR
MO. PAYABLE TO:
J a A Services
Dept. 8-3'
P.O. Box 1205
Mt. Cleuns, MI
48043

(PLEASE PRINT(
NAME

Michigan Resdents
Add 4% sales tax_

ADDRESS

SHIPPING _&
HANDL.ING

STATE

ZIP

I

TOTAL

E

L3. _ _ _

f 4

PLEASE ALLOW 2 TO 4 WEEKS DELIVERY

WINAMAC, Ind. (UPI) - The Ford
Motor Co. executive in charge of the
1973 Pinto testified yesterday he was
not familiar with statistics which led
the government to ask the firm to recall
that car because of fuel system
problems.
In other testimony, a consultant to
the Big Three automakers said he
never cautioned Ford about fires in
rear end collisions because they are so
rare.
BOTH MEN testified at Ford's trial
for negligent homicide in the deaths of
three girls whose 1973 Pinto exploded in
flames when struck from the rear by a
van.
Prosecutor Michael Cosentino tried
to get into evidence figures from a
study for the National Highway Traffic
Safety Administration, on which he said
the agency based its recommendation
the 1973 Pinto be recalled for changes in
its fuel system.
Cosentino said those figures for 1973
cars showed Pintos suffered twice the
national average for deaths in rear end
collisions resulting in fire.
HAROLD MACDONALD, the
engineer in charge of Ford passenger
cars from 1965 to 1975, replied to every
question about the study, "I am not
familiar with those statistics."
Judge Harold Staffeldt instructed the

jury not to regard the figures quoted by
Cosentino as evidence. The prosecutor
told reporters he would try again to get
those figures admitted into evidence.
MacDonald, who said he and his son
both owned and drove 1973 Pintos, cited
another set of federal statistics for 1975-
76 comparing the Pinto to the avera
of all other cars in fatal accidents
which there was a fire.
HE SAID only 673 fatal accidents in
that period involved fires, and only 13 of
those fires were in Pintos. He said there
were 96 million autos in operation in
that period, of which 1,850,000 were Pin-
tos.
Donald Huelke, professor of anatomy
at the University's Medical School, w*
has been a consultant to Ford, Chrysler
and General Motors, said fires in auto
collisions are "extremely rare events."
He said in a study of more than'3,500
accidents he investigated since 1961, he
remembered only two fire deaths.
Huelke said his research was done prior
to the 1973 model year, so his data did
not include the 1973 Pinto.
HUELKE SAID Ford hired him frr
1965 to 1973 because "they wanted to s
what was happening in the real world"
in accident injuries. He said he lectured
Ford employees monthly, but never
mentioned fire in rear end accidents
because there were more important
things to talk about.

CHEENOS
NEW SPRING COLORS NOW IN

Fresh out of the Seabees,
I sought out some t'op-flight
engineers who knew their
disciplines, and would share their
knowledge. And weren't afraid to
see newcomers take hold and
become project leaders.
I found what I wanted here at
Duke Power, so I became a
"temporary"
But what looked like a learning
experience has turned into a career,
with a lot of responsibility. Like in
1963, when I helped build Cowans

hydro generation for our system
and impound Lake Norman, with
its 550-mile shoreline. It's the
cooling pond for Plant Marshall,
our world-beating, high-efficiency
coal-fired steam station. And for
McGuire Nuclear Station, being
prepared now to go on-line.
You can discover career
excitement here, too. With
competitive salaries, great
benefits, a fine cultural calendar
and continuing education
opportunities at major colleges and

year-round golf and tennis. Or
fishing for the big ones (in Lake
Norman, of course).
Want to know more? Tell me
what you're after, and enclose a
copy of your resume and transcript.
Write to me at Duke Power
Company, P O. Box 33189,
Charlotte, North Carolina 28242.

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