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February 19, 1980 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-02-19

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STA T E DEPT. OFFICIAL OUTLINES PROGRAM

The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, February 19, 1980-Page 3

Minority diplomats

enc

By LISSA OLIVER
Ambassador Ronald Palmer, a
deputy assistant secretary for person-
pel in the State Department's Bureau of
Personnel, yesterday encouraged
minority students at the University to
consider the opportunities open to them
in a career as a diplomat.
"We're looking for diplomats,"
Palmer said to about 25 students
gathered in the Union's Pendleton
Room. "I'm just hoping that I can in-
fluence just one person who, 25 years
from now, will make a difference."
ALTHOUGH diplomats are
traditionally chosen from Ivy League
schools, Palmer said he has started
touring top colleges in the Midwest and
California. He said it's important for
students to meet someone in the field as
just "an ordinary person" so the idea of
a diplomatic career is not
unimaginable to them.
An affirmative action program in-
stituted by the Johnson administration
in 1967 has increased the number of
minorities in the diplomatic corps,
Palmer said. But he added that
although there has been progress, "it
clearly has not all been done." -
In 1955, Palmer was only the third
black to complete the program. Today
blacks make up roughly four per cent of
the corps' total, he said.
PALMER, WHO has worked in
American Embassies in Indonesia,
Malaysia, and Denmark, said that
people considering diplomacy as a
career should be able to cope in even
the most difficult conditions. "We are
looking for people who like challenges
and those who can grasp other peoples'
feelings and aspirations."
Along with possessing these intrinsic
qualities, a prospective diplomat must
successfully complete an intense
testing program. A written test
separates the top 25 per cent from the
rest of the applicants, and these people
are given an oral test. Under the affir-
mative action program, a student can
waive the written test.
The oral test assesses the person's
ability to talk to and get along with
other people, Palmer said. A
background investigation of the ap-
plicant is then made for security
reasons and a physical examination is
given.
THE STATE Department tries to
coordinate the person's interests with
available positions, although Palmer
said a diplomat must be available
wdrld-wide.
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE
PROGRAM presents
FACETS PERFORMANCE
ENSEMBLE'S
SOLSTICE
THURSDAY, FEB. 28,
8 PM - POWER CENTER
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ouraged
After meeting the written and oral
requirements, the diplomat undergoes
counselor training and is sent to an
American embassy in another country.
Here, it is his or her duty to serve the
American people in that country in
every way possible.
"There is also a junior rotating
program," Palmer said, "where the
diplomat rotates through the depar-
tments of the embassy." In this
program, a person can work as a repor-
ter, negotiator or representative of the
embassy in one of four areas: politics,
economics, administration, and coun-
selling.
THE CURRENT situation in Iran has
had little effect on the program as a
whole, Palmer explained. "It makes us
think that this could happen to anyone,"
but after the capturing of the embassy
in November, there was still a great
deal of applicants for the test, given
every December, he said.
There are "two serious reasons" why
Palmer became interested in the
diplomacy field. He was interested in
the work of political scientist Ralph
Bunche, the first black awarded a
Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts in
seeking peace in the Middle East in
1950.

SUICIDE and the Meaning of Life
THREE PART WORKSHOP
II. Responding: Confronting
Individual and Social Stress

WILLIAM GERLER
Ph.D. Assoc. Prof. of Psychology, UM
Tues., Feb. 19
7:30 p.m.

CAMPUS
CHAPEL
1256 Washf.new
One block north of
South University and Forest

U

THANIO'S CO.

514 E. Washington

welcomes you to

SUNDAV BRUNCHES11:30.4

COME AS YOU ARE for our other specials:
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See for yourself the many items included on our menu.
Prices range from 504 to $9.75

After G.um-ation
Tie Your Career
To The Growth Of
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Daily Photo by JIM KRUZ
STATE DEPARTMENT official Ronald Palmer spoke yesterday in the
Pendleton Room of the Michigan Union about minority opportunities in
diplomatic work. He encouraged minority students to look for a challenging
job in the foreign service.

FILMS
Cinema Two-Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors, 7,9 p.m., MLB 3.
Ecumenical Campus Center-The Long Search, 7:30 p.m., 921 Church
St.
Cinema Guild-The Scandalous Adventures of Buraikan, 8 p.m., Old.
Arch. Aud.
Residential College-Memories of Justice, Part II of a documentary on
the 3rd Reich, Vietnam, and Algeria, 8:30-10.: 30, 124 E.Q'
MEETINGS
Society of Christian Engineers-noon, room 244, W. Engineering.
LSA Student Gov't Curriculum Action Group-7 p.m., Conference Room
4, Michigan Union.
Washtenaw Association for Retarded Citizens-7:30 p.m., High Point
Cafetorium, 1735 S. Wagner Road, Ann Arbor.
SPEAKERS
Dept. of Medical Care Org.-Christine Bishop, National Long-Term
Care Insurance," noon, School of Public Health, 2522 Vaughan Bldg.
PAC/Guild House-Debbie Duke, "South Africa and Divestment:
Alternatives to Supporting Political Repression," noon, 802 Monroe.
Resource Policy & Mgmt. Prog.-Alfred Beeton, "Water Quality and the
Great Lakes," noon, 1028 Dana.
Ctr. for Chinese Studies-Shuen-fu Lin and Paul Ropp, "How to Read the
Scholars: Literary and Social Criticism of Ju-lin Wai-shih," noon, Lane Hall
Commons Room.
Bioengineering-Paul Zalesky, "Invasive and Noninvasive Device
Development Within A Large Corporation," 4 p.m., 1042 E. Engineering.
Dept. of Geological Sci.-Ian S. E. Carmichael, "Preeruptive Conditions
in Silicic Magma Chambers," 4 p.m., 4001 C. C. Little.
Chemistry Dept.:-L. Messerle, "Synthesis and Chemistry of Tantalum
Benzyl, Benzylidene and Benzylidyne Complexes," 4 p.m., 1200 Chem. Bldg.
Physics/Astronomy-S. R. Nagel, U-Chicago, "Quench Echoes in
Molecular Dynamics; A New Phonon Spectroscopy," 4 p.m., 2938 Randall.
Center for Afro-American and African Studies, Department of
Anthropology-Luc de Hushe, "African Sacred Kingship Reconsidered," 7
p.m., Rackham East Conference Room.
Computing Center-"The SCOPE/Hustler System Used at Michigan
State, 7:30 p.m., Lecture Room 145, Chrysler Center.
PERFORMANCES
School of Music-University Jazz Band, 8 p.m., Rackham.
EXHIBITS
Kelsey Museum of Archaeology- "Faces of Immortality," 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
Museum of Art-"Eighteenth-Century Prints and Drawings,"
"Ceramics from U-M Collections," 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Slusser Gallery-"Works in Progress," 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Clements Library-"Eighteenth Century British Architecture," 9 a.m.-
noon, 1-5 p.m.
Bentley Historical Collections-"Women's Athletics at the U-M: The
Early Years," 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Exhibit Museum-"Indians of the Great Lakes Region," 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Pendleton Arts Center-Fabrics by Marlene Gervais, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Union Art Gallery-"Projected & Unprojected Recollections,"
Instillations ABC/CBS/NBC," by Steven West, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Rare Book Room-"French Illustrated Books of the Eighteenth
Century," 10 a.m.-noon, 1-5 p.m.
Matthaei Botanical Gardens-"House Plants," 10 at m.-4:30 p.m.
Stearns Collection-Musical Instruments, 1-4:30 p.m.
M1ICUt4 . A NIT T

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"important work Is be-
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Werner Herzog
compared to early Pilobolus
A NIGHT OF CELTIC
MYTH AND MAGIC

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