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February 17, 1980 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-02-17

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the Michigan Daily-Sunday, February 17, 1980-Page 3

Report finds black
students alienated

By KEVIN TOTTIS
Black students at the University and
several of its peer institutions across
the nation find themselves in a hostile
environment, suffer from inadequate
financial support, and are often
handicapped by poor secondary school
preparation, according to a recent
government report.
The study, which was commissioned
by the National"Advisory Committee on
Black Higher Education aryl the
Department of Health, Eduation and
Welfare, reported that, for the most
part, black students seemed lonely,
depressed, and alienated. "They feel
their universities are hostile places and
their relationships with white
professors and white students are often
demoralizing," the report said.
THE PURPOSE of the study was to
identify problems associated with black
undergradaute attrition rates, propose
strategies for their retention and
gradaution from college, and to make
recommendations "regarding the
responsibilities of predominately white
institutions in assuring access and
graduation opportunities to black
students."
An investigator from the City
University of New York surveyed and
conducted personal interviews with 84
black students, 47 black administrators
and faculty, and 38 white
administrators and faculty at four
) private and three public universities in
different geographical regions
throughout the country. Along with the
University, these institutions. included
Harvard, Rutgers, Duke, Chicago,
Stanford, and UCLA.
The survey was divided into three
parts including: barriers to admission
to the university; barriers to remaining
at the university; and possible
remedies to these problems.
According ,to, the report, the
responses of black students, faculty,
and administrators differed greatly

from those of the white faculty and
administrators.
FOR EXAMPLE, 77 per cent of the
black students indicated that
inadequate financial aid was either a
somewhat important or very important
barrier to admission. 74 per cent of the
black faculty and administration
agreed, while only 26 per cent of the
white faculty and administrators
concurred.
All three groups, however, felt that
poor secondary school preparation was
a barrier to admission, with 86 per cent
of the black students agreeing, and 85
per cent and 74 per cent of the black and
white faculty and administration
agreeing respectively.
Seventy-seven per cent of the
students felt that feelings of alienation
and loneliness were a deterrent to
remaining in school, while 96 per cent of
the black faculty and administrators
agreed. Only 60 per cent of the white
faculty and administrators felt
likewise.
NINETY-FOUR per cent of the
students surveyed perceived a need for
an increased number of black
administrative and faculty role models.
All of the black administrators and
faculty agreed, compared to 68 per cent
of their white counterparts.
One recommendation for
improvement stressed admissions and
recruitment policies that seek out
students from "under-achieving inner-
city high schools." Policies that are
designed to admit only high achieving
students "who have been socialized to
fit the university's image" will exclude
the majority of black youths, the report
said.
One of the most critical needs, the
study said, was that of counseling.
"Black students are subjected to
extraordinary wipressures at
predominately white universities," the
report said.

EVERY SUNDAY we offer a
SPECIAL IALIAN BUFFET
ALL YOU CAN EAT
FOR ONLY $4.95
Includes: Lasagna-Chicken Cacciatori-Veal-Meatballs-
Italian Sausage-Spaghetti or Mostaccioli-Vegetable Minne-
stroni, and French Onion Soup. Salad Bar with over 25 items.
HOURS 2 p.m. till midnight;
BUFFET open till 9 p.m.
call for other all-you-can-eat specials Mon. through Thurs.

Downtown
665-3231

8IM80'S

114 E.
Washington

w.m

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GUEST ARTIST WED.-SAT. at 8 p.m.
SERIES 1979-80 SUNDAY at 2p.m.
Feb. 20-24v siy4M h ' D pslower Cf nt er J

E

D

E

N

MEL WINKLER t'k a Play by STEVE CARTER

AP Photo
/ We are DEVO
A member of a new wave rock group? A reject from a UFO? No, it is
actually Bernhard Blass, East German Olympic gold medal winner in
yesterday's luge competition. For a full report on yesterday's events, see
story, Page 10.
U.N. ambassador arrives
in Jordan, talks begin

*

Tickets at PTF
ticket office
Michigan League
M-F 10-1 & 2-5
Master Charge 8
VISA on phone 8
mail.
PHONE:
764-0450

SUNDAY
FILMS
The A2 Committee to End the Blockard Against Cuba-Memories of
Underdevelopment, 7:30 p.m., Conf. rooms 4 and 5, Michigan Union.
Cinema Guild--Now Voyager. 7:07,9:15p.m., Old Arch. Aud.
AACF-Tenth Annual A2 8mm Film Festival, 7, 9 p.m., Schorling Aud,
School of Education.
Cinema Two-Les Enfants Terribles, 7 p.m., Orpheus, 9 p.m., Aud. A,
Angell.
PERFORMANCES
School of Music-Violinist Angel Reyes, Pianist Deanne Vanden Berg,
CRackham Aud., 4 p.m.
Canterbuy Loft-"Homegrown Women's Music Series," Barb Perez and
Beth Doyle, with original folk, soul, and funk, 7:30 p.m., 332 S. State.
Canterbury Loft-"Waiting for Godot" by Samuel Beckett. The
premiere of the Canterbuy Stage Co., 8:00 p.m., 332 S. State.
Hillel-Israeli Dancing, 1p.m., Hillel, 1429 Hill St.
MISCELLANEOUS
Gay Discussion Group-Sharing of Creative Arts, 6:00 p.m., Guild
House, 602 Monroe St.
WUOM-"A Special Report from South Africa," featuring Benjamin
Pogrand, Rand Daily Mail, Johannesburg: 91.5 F.M., 5:30 p.m.
Aktsia-Soviet Jewry Letter Writing Campaign, Hillel, 6:30 p.m.
-a U-M Women's & Men's Gymnastics-vs. Indiana State, Bowling Green:
1 p.m., Crisler.
U-M Wrestling vs. Wisconsin, 4 p.m., Crisler Arena.
MEETINGS
Hiking Club-Meet at Rackham, northwest entry on E. Huron, 1:30
p.m.
MONDAY
FILMS
Rec. Sports-Fitness Film Series--From the Fat of the Land, 2230
CCRB, 10:30 a.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
Cinema Guild-High Noon, 7, 9 p.m., Old Arch. Aud.
A, AAFC-D.W. Griffith Shorts (1900-1913), 7 p.m.,; Juarez, 8:304p.m., Aud.
Arbor Alliance-The Accident, 7:30 p.m., Anderson Room D, Michigan
Union.
MEETINGS
Michigan Journal of Economics-4 p.m., 301 Econ.
Orinteering Club-7:30 p.m., 2230 CCRB.
Committee for Citizens Party-7:30 p.m., Room D, Michigan League.
SPEAKERS
Center for Afro-Ameican Studies-panel discussion, "Black Labor in
Detroit: Industrial Boom and Decline," 7:30 p.m., Whiting Aud., School of
ti Education.
English Composition Board-Carolyn Gilboa, "Writing and Foreign
Language Students," 4 p.m., WhitingAud., School of Education.
18th Century Semester-Martine Browley, "Gibbon as Historian and
Autobiographer," 4 p.m., Clements Library.
Kelsey Museum and Classical Studies Dept.-Prof. Sheils McNally,
"Excavations at Akhmim, Egypt," 4 p.m., Aud. D, Angell.
Career Planning and Placement-Ambassador Ronald D. Palmer, State
Dept, "Minority Opportunities in Diplomatic Careers," 4 p.m., Pendleton
Room, Union.
MISCELLANEOUS
Rec. Sports-Self-directed Fitness Clinic, Aquataic fitness, 7:30 p.m.,
NCRB.

AMMAN, Jordan (UPI)-U.N.
Ambassador Donald McHenry arrived
in Jordan yesterday on the fifth leg of
his seven-nation Middle East tour and
immediately began closed-door talks
with King Hussein.
McMenry's arrival in Jordan came
only hours after reports in New York
and Jordan and the Islamic council had
requested that the U.N. Security
Council meet to discuss Israeli
settlements in the occupied West Bank.
A GOVERNMENT source insisted
the timing of McHenry's two-day visit
and the call for a meeting of the 15-
nation Security Council was

coincidental.
But McHenry confirmed he had been
notified of the request and said he was
certain the issue of the Israeli
settlements would come up during his
talks with Jordanian officials.
The 48-year-old career diplomat was
taken from the airport to Bassman
Palace to meet with King Hussein for
what officials said would be three or
four hours.
Jordan has been concerned about
continued Israeli occupation of the
West Bank, particularly the current
curfew in the Arab town of Hebron,
which Hussein was expected to discuss
with McHenry

44^

- . -, - I mmmibmai

. . " r
.
+ .
'

PRESENTS

LES ENFANTS TERRIBLES
(JEAN-PIERRE MELVILLE, 1950)

THANO'S CO.

514 E. Wshington

Poet-filmmaker Jean Cocteau personally chose Melville
to direct his story about the beauty of the shared disorder
and confused narcissism of a brother and sister whose fate
is one of inescapable self-destruction. Narration by Coc-
teau. "The music (Bach, Vivaldi) is one of the few effective
film usages of great music."-New Yorker. (100 min) 7:00
ONLY.
ORPHEUS (JEAN COCTEAU, 1949)
This remarkable film depicts the love of the poet Orpheus
for the princess who travels between this world and the
next. Cocteau reveals a poetic fascination with the power
and conflict of the real world with the world of imagina-
tion and the unknown. French, with subtitles. (96 min)
9:00 ONLY

welcomes you to
SUNDAY BRUNCHES
with complimentary champagne
from 11:30 to 4:00

Also, we would like to introduce our new place to you with
the same pizza recipe as Thano's Lamplighter.
From 4-11 on Sunday nights, our pizzas will be /2 price
and there will also be special beer prices.
We wait to serve you starting Sunday, Feb. 3

ANGELL HALL

$1.50 one show, $2.50 both shows

Tuesday-SHADOWS OF FORGOTTEN ANCESTORS

WEDNESDAYS are BEER NIGHTS

_____ 6IVEN SITY ,%1t.'USICA L MCIETY pIrfe.ScIt,
Rampal and Lagoya
Flute and Guitar
Monday, Feb. 18,8:30,
Hill Auditorium
Student rush tickets available Monday, February 18
at Hill Auditorium Box Office, 4-4:30. $3 each. Limit
of two per person.

(Upper Level)
fO#NMON, TUE, THURS, FRI 7:05-9:30
SAT-SUN-WED 1:00-3:00-5:00-7:00-9:15
CAPTAIN AVENGER MAKES DUST0BUSTi
HEL P ISAONTHE WAY

JOHN
R11'TEI't
.........:::.

ANN

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