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February 14, 1980 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-02-14

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Page 6-Thursday, February 14, 1980-The Michigan Daily 0

U' seeks answers

for

,. -

5
i

(Continued from Page1)'
in finding and preparing students to ap-
,ply to the University.
Many of the minority applicants,
.noted Erickson, don't have the
;qualifications for admission. "If a kid
; isn't qualified we don't bring him in,"
he said.
R Minority students .could be accepted
:with as low as 900 on the AT and a 2.8
agrade point average, Erickson said. He
gadded that it varies greatly from
student to student.
COMPETITION IS heavy for out-
standing minority students, Erickson
said, and the University can't always
keep up with Ivy League schools who
,can fly an attractive applicant out to
spend a weekend at the Eastern school.
"The administration is very under-
standing," said Erickson. "They don't
put pressure on us. They know solutions
are difficult.
A key to improved recruitment is the
development of relations with high
schools both in Detroit and out-state,
4,
J
The Ann Arbor Film coope
Thursday, February 14 ,
(Albert and David Maysles, 1969) r
4 The actions and words of four door-tc
they do their work, relax after hours ar
of this complex and fascinating docun
the four, who feels "he is slipping." This
condescending nor coldly critical. In f
former door-to-door salesmen-came
Paul. A revealing look at what Erik Bar
tant element in the American film expel
Roger Corman - Ho
(Christian Blackwood, 1978)
An in-depth examination of the mar
PETER FONDA, MARTIN SCORSESE, R
reveal glimpses of the Roger Cormc
MEMOIRS OF A MOVIE PALACE (Chr
the classic KING THEATER in Brooklyn
who make it run. "Roll 'em, Smokev."
THIS WEEKEND: The Tenth Ann Arl
Auditorium, School of Education.
Also this Friday: Howard Hawks' B
BLONDES at MLB.

according to George Goodman, director
of the Opportunity Program.
"WE HAVE, gone through all the
motions of recruitment," Goodman told
a group of mostly black students at a
Center for Afro-American Studies
Colloquium yesterday. "But we have
not developed the pipelines from the
secondary schools."
Goodman, who first came to the
University as a black admissions coun-
selor in 1968, said admissions coun-
selors need to establish rapport with
younger high school students, their
parents, and counselors so the young
people can be properly prepared for the
University. "You cannot recruit
students if you only work with the
seniors," he added.
Concerned with the quality of Detroit
high schools, Goodman said there has
been "a whole lot of slippage" in the
Detroit secondary schools, with the
exception of Cass Tech, which he said
"still leads the path" in high-caliber
education. In many high schools, said

4
t

4,

Goodhan, a student can eas
average just going to class e
"I DON'T THINK a lot of t
in the city (Detroit) are
them," said Sherri King, L
and Black Student Uni
member.
Once minority student

declining
ily earn a B "We'd like to believe (the attrition
very day. improvement) is because students are
high schools getting more services," said John
preparing Russ, the director of the Coalition for
SA student the Use of Learning Skills (CULS).
on (BSU) Russ said he believed students are
becoming more aware of the
s come to requirements of the University.

'De-centralization has been a problem. It enforces a
feeling of loneliness, and ultimately rejection.'
-George Goodman,
Opportunity Program director

almost every department of the
University. "De-centralization has
been a problem," said Goodman. "It
enforces a feeling of loneliness, and
ultimate rejection."
BSU President Virna Hobbs noted the
difficulty some students have adjusting
to life at the "big University" after
living in urban areas. She said she
would rather see one or two quality
supportive services instead of the
confusing network of services now
offered.
SHAPIRO SAID the University
should "give serious consideration to a
more centralized approach to minority
concerns. Something may get lost
between the cracks," Shapiro said.
The University needs creative,
innovative programs designed to meet
problems, said Minority Student
Services Counselor Richard Garland.
During the early 1970s, Garland
served as the sole Black Advocate for
the Unviersity. He said he had trouble
getting any extra funding to expand the
Black Advocate's office to meet the
needs of thethen-increasing black
population on campus.
"You reap what you sow," he said.
"If we had those things then we could

lack enrollment

have kept improving... but it seems
my proposals fell on deaf ears."
He noted the problems the University
has experienced in recent years and
said, "They are not just the problems of
minorities, they are the problems of thb
majority as well." There is a
communication gap between blacks
and whites, he said, mentioning an
ethnic festival Minority Student
Services is sponsoring. "The most
disturbing thing is there won't be any
white students there," he said.
Black enrollment in the '70s never
went much higher than seven per
cent-far from what the originalnBAM
strikers envisioned. And yet, a
Goodman noted, "the strike was a
essential part of what needed to occur
in the institution. The momentum of the
strike made things happen quicker."
The BAM strike brought a cultural
awareness to the black University
community that can be seen today in
the minority dorm groups, Afro-
American studies courses, and events
such as Black History month. "The
spirit we attempted to provide paved
the way for others," said Goodman.
spirit is a hard thing to cut off."

campus, the University often has a
hard time keeping them here.
According to the minority enrollment
report, the attrition rate for, black
students entering in 1975 was over 50
per cent and the Native American
attrition rate was even higher. Whites
from the class of 1975 had an attrition
rate of 29 per cent.
Although the report's statistics from
students entering in 1976 are not
complete yet, preliminary reports
indicate that the minority attrition rate
may be declining.

CULS is a special unit in LSA that
provides academic subport services,
special credit courses, study groups,
skills assistance, and specialty
counseling. The Opportunity program,
a service aimed at both recruitment
and retention, brings educationally
disadvantaged students to the
University and helps provide them with
academic, personal, and financial aid
counseling.
THE UNIVERSITY'S numerous
minority support systems come under

rsttv0 Presents at Not. Sci.: $1.50
ULESMAN 70-A.SI
nd attend a sales convention. The focus
mentary is Paul, the least successful of
s candid view of Bible-hustling is neither
act, the Maysles brothers-themselves
to empathize with the doubt-ridden
nouw has called "a symbol of an impor-
rience."
llywood's Wild Angel
8:45-NAT. SCI.
n behind the myth. Corman graduates
ON HOWARD.and DAVID CARRADINE
in school of filmmaking. Plus short:
ristian Blackwood, 1979): a fond look at
its classic architecture and the people
bor 8mm Film Festival at Schorling,
ALL OF FIRE and GENTLEMEN PREFER

NA TIONWIDE STUDENT ENR OLLMENT VARIES

Universities similar in

(Continued from Page 1)
which supplies the universities with
names of qualified minority students.
The universities usually call these
students or mail them information.
Another common form of recruit-
ment is high school visitation. Many
universities send representatives to
predominately black schools in an ef-
fort to interest the students and make
them aware of the opportunities and
programs at the universities. The
University of Michigan employs both
these methods in their recruitment
programs.
NORTHWESTERN University, a
private university in Evanston, Ill., is
the only Big Ten school with a higher
percentage of black enrollment than
U 5

the University of MIchigan, according
to a report the Regents will receive
today. According to Northwestern
Assistant Director of Admissions
Walter Clark, that figure is 10 per cent.
Clark added that high school visitations
and the Student Search also play an im-
portant role in Northwestern's
recruitment process. .
After a minority student is admitted,
he said, the university calls them. They
also provide a summer program for
some minority students. According to
Clark, Northwestern's attrition rate is
20 per cent for both minorities and non-
minorities. Clark attributed the low at-
trition rate and high black enrollment
to the fact that Northwestern is
"private and selective. We screen for
success," he said. "We don't admit
students unless we feel they can make
it."
OHIO STATE University, a public
university in Columbus, Ohio, does not
use the Student Search. They do incor-
porate, however, a "Program for
Progress." According to Ruth
Gresham, director for recruitment and
staff development, OSU contacts high
school counselors throughout the state
of Ohio and asks them for-names of
"academically strong" minority high
school seniors. These students spend a
day on the Ohio State campus as a form
of orientation. 'OSU supplies the tran-
sportation and meals.
The publicUniversity of California at
Berkley, along with the other Univer-
sity of California schools, provides

programs for minority studer
back as the seventh grade. The
of these programs, according
Baranco, director of thec
relations with schools, is "to
understand about college" and
can begin college prep classe
the students reach the tent
programs offered includ
Engineering, Science, Upwar
University - Partner, an

recruiting
its as far fective means of recruitment. "It's
e purpose more expensive, but more productive"
to Lynn he said.
office of . He added that currently Berkeley's
let them percentage of black enrollment is only
i "so they four per cent, but said it is increasing.
s." When Three hundred fifty-six out of 6,559
h grade, undergraduates are black at Stanford
e Math, University, a private university in Palo
rd Bound Alto, California, according to Cedric
d Pre- Smith, assistant director of admissions.

'We screen for success, we don't admit students unless
we feel they can make it.'
- Walter Clark, Assistant Director of Admissions,
Northwestern University

WOW -PITCHER
BLAKE EDWARDS'
R at
, ti RCUx
SFRI-~a 5:30 7 4950
'FRI-$1.50 til 6:00 (or capacity) 1140 South University
SAT, SUN-1:00 3:10, 5:30, 7:40, 9:50 668-8411
SAT, SUN-$1.50 til 1:30 (or capacity)
(gulng h6
Gung Ho, adjective.
Enthusiastic. Energetic.
Willing to help. From an
-_--- old Chinese phrase, "work
together." Describes very
old peasant farmers and-
very new students. Meijer
isgung ho about college,
too. Meijer Thrifty Acres
is perfect for college stu-
dents; new and old. We
have the selection of the
name brands you want,
priced to save you money.
Maybe enough for chow
mein and won ton for two.
And we have Meijer
people, gung ho. Always
willing to help.
' E
Y4b.

Professional programs. With these
programs, a teacher at each high
school "watches over" the students,
Baranco said.
A program for high school juniors
and seniors that is primarily funded by
private industry is also available and
provides a financial incentive to the
students depending on their grades at
the end of each report card period.
Awards can -be up to $400 and $500 a
year for juniors and seniors respec-
tively.
BARANCO SAID that visiting the
California high schools rather than
mailing out information was a more ef-

....Mowm.mn

''Federico Fellini's

1954

LA STRADA
The quaint, simple gelsomina (GIULETTA MASINA) is "bought" by the British
and jealous Zampino (ANTONY QUINN)} to help him with his traveli ng strong
man act. Too late he realizes his love for her as well as his-dependenceon
her. A touching story set with outstanding realism in the Italian countryside,
this was Fellini's first film to gain world acclaim. With Richard Basehart.
Short: Snub Pollard in ALL LIT UP.
Friday: BLACK AND WHITE IN COLOR

That is roughly 18.4 per cent. Stanford's
recruitment procedures include using
the Student Search, high scho
visitations and a weekend for bla
students. Stanford's attrition rate is
practically non-existent, Smith said. He
said this is largely due to the fact that
Stanford uses an A through D grading
scale - if someonefails- a course it is
stricken from;his or her record. Also,
anyone may drop a course up until the
final.
YALE UNIVERSITY, a private
university in New Haven, Conn., usO
both alunini and current un-
dergraduates in all of their recruiting,
Sylvia Balderrama, director of
minority recruitment said. "The
Minority Recruitment Program," she
said, "puts many undergrads on the
road to visit their hometowns." Ap-
proximately 200 alumni groups also
participate in the recruiting process.
Their jobs range from interviewing
students to visiting them during th
junior year in high school. "This is dor
for everybody, with an emphasis on
minority recruitment," Balderrman
'said.
Yale's attrition rate is relatively low
- between one and two per cent,
Balderrama said. "It's difficult to say,
because we have a very liberal leave of
absence policy," Balderrama said. She
explained that a student could possibly
take off three years and still return to
the university.

CINEMA GUILD

TONIGHT AT
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$1.50

' _.

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Now Playing at Butterfield Theatres

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EXCEPT WAYSIDE

ADULTS FRI.. SAT .SUN.'
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MON. THRU THURS.
EVENINGS ... $3.00
MATINEES UNTIL 5:30
EXCEPT HOLIDAYS . .$2.50
CHILDREN 14 & UNDER ... $1.50

MONDAY NIGHT IS
"GUEST NIGHT"
Two Adults Admitted
For $3.00
EXCEPT WAYSIDE

I

CAPTAIN-
JOHN RfI1R AVENGER_
ANNE ARCHER MAKES
DUST
HELP
IS ON 4
THE
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Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri at 7:05, 9:30 Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri at 7:00, 9:15
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WeSt, usnFr at7:,9Mon., Tues., Thurs. at 7:05, 9:30
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GEORGE SEGAL- NATALIE WOOD "
The comedy
that fools around a lot!
~e- LAST ENDS THURSDAY
MARRIED S! THE COMEDY THAT
-V LCOMES OUT OF R
THE CLOSET
~4-~ ..R...'

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Use Daily
Class if ieds

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