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February 14, 1980 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-02-14

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The Michigan Daily-Thursday, February 14, 1980-Page 3
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Heat dsese ay e revented

BOSTON F(AP)-A comparison of
blood samples taken from marathon
runners, joggers, and inactive people
vides new evidence that exercising
ay help prevent heart disease,
researchers say.
The study found that the more people
run, the higher their blood levels of high
density lipoprotein cholesterol, or
HDL, a substance that is associated with
a reduced risk of coronary heart
disease.
The researchers said it was the
amount of running, not what people ate,
at determined whether they had high
low levels of this blood fat.
Unlike low .. density lipoprotein

Run for a healthier heart

cholesterol, which is suspected of
causing hardening of the arteries, the
high density substance is believed to
provide protection from heart trouble.
The study, conducted at Methodist
Hospital in Houston, was published in
Thursday's issue of the New England
Journal of Medicine.
"Results suggest that HDL
differences among the three groups
were primarily the result of distance
run, not dietary factors," the
researchers concluded.
The researchers took blood samples

from 59 marathon runners, 85 joggers,
and 74 inactive men, all between the
ages of 35 and 66.
HDL levels were 65 milligrams per
deciliter in thermarathoners, 59 in
joggers and 43 in non-exercisers.
Earlier studies have shown that high
levels of HDL are associated with a
lowered risk of heart disease. But
researchers were unsure whether
people could change their HDL levels
by varying what they ate.
There have been reports that HDL
levels go up if people drink alcohol

moderatley or lose weight.
"The marathon runners and joggers
did not differ substantially from the
inactive subjects in their reported
dietary habits, although they had
significantly higher HDL-cholesterol
levels," the researchers wrote.
They attributed the differences to the
men's exercising habits.
"Even the joggers, who averaged
only 11 miles per week, had
significantly higher HDL levels than
did the inactive men."
The scientists noted that HDL in the
blood of the runners was elevated "to
a level associated with a significant
reduction of coronary risk."

COUNSELING GROUP FOR:
CHILDREN OF DIVORCE
Counseling Services is offering a group for students
who want to explore the effects their parents' divorce
has had on their own interpersonal relationships.
Such topics as security, trust, rejection, loneliness,
and commitment will be discussed.
Meeting time:
Mondays 2-4 p.m.
For more info, call 764-8312 or stop by 3100 Michigan Union

.. . ...... ............ ..................... ..:.......::,:. .: .. .. .................... ....:. .: .

Gov't: U.S. losing lead in space technology

WASHINGTON (AP) - The United States is in
4anger of losing its lead in space technology unless it
vests more in the promising new field of space
manufacturing, the General Accountin Office (GAO)
warns.
Russia, Japan and several European countries,
particularly West Germany, are devoting strong ef-
forts to this potentially exciting research, which
could lead to a big commercial payoff, the GAO said
in a report released this week.
MANY SCIENTISTS, the agency said, envision
that by the end of this century there will be orbiting
factories producing new or better metals and alloys,
0mbi

perfect crystals, composite materials, glasses,
semiconductors, chemicals and high purity
medicines and vaccines that can't be made on Earth.
If the United States is to exploit this relatively
unknown field, the government must develop an in-
novative plan with private industry, and both must be
prepared to take financial risks, the report stated.
"Failure of such creative and extraordinary
measures on the part of the U.S. government could
lead to the loss of U.S. preeminence in space, both
technologically and ecqnomically," said the GAO,
which is the investigative arm of Congress.

ALTHOUGH EXPERIMENTS conducted aboard
Skylab and the Russian Salyut space stations have
been encouraging, the agency said it is too early to
predict what materials might be manufactured in the
weightless vacuum of space or their economic poten-
tial.
"Thus, the program receives little'visibility or sup-
port in the Congress or by the administration, and
correspondingly, low priority and funding by the
National Aeronautics and Space Administration
(NASA), the report said. "Similarly, private industry
cannot be expected to risk high, long term investmen-
ts at the present stage of research.

Valentine's
Da
and
Thur. Feb. 14 8pm on
Try the Count's Love Potion.
668-8411 S.University and Church

41
*4
r1

!':

Youth overreacting to
registration plan-Carter

(Continued from Page 1)
fort by Congress to reduce the defense
budget below the level he has proposed.
Carter said there have been steady in-
creases in defense spending throughout
is administration, and said the
proposal to increase that spending by
five per cent, discounting for inflation,
is proper.
s He signed "with enthusiasm" the
congressionally approved legislation
providing for $1.5 billion in government
loan guarantees, to the Chrysler Corp.
Carter did say he would not support
such actions as a continuing policy of

the government.
" The refusal by the French gover-
nment to take part in a meeting of the
United States and its European allies in
Bonn, West German, on Feb. 20 was
"unfortunate."
He said, "We did not communicate
adequately, but that is just a minor in-
cident among the major agreements
between ourselves and our allies."
Carter said he has been generally
well pleased with the support the
United States has received from its
allies on the Afghanistan crisis.

Let Your Love
Run Rampant
HP -
HAPPY VALENINE'S DA Y!

WHAT CAN WE LEARN
FROM THE JAPANESE? (PART I1)
THE CENTER FOR JAPANESE STUDIES
AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Announces o
PANEL DISCUSSION
ON
EZRA VOGEL'S
JAPAN AS NUMBER ONE

FILMS

1 I
I
Y
t

Ifr t
-'.4'
lpt:-

JOHN C. CAMPBELL, Dept. of Political Science
Strengths and Weaknesses of the Japanese
Bureaucracy and Welfare System
ROBERT E. COLE, Dept. of Sociology
The Japanese Company: Employee Satisfaction
and Alienation
VICTOR KOBAYASHI, School of Education
The Japanese Education System: Model or
Nightmare
DAVID H. STARK, Dept. of Anthropology
Crime Control in Japan: The Social Context of
Law Enforcement

M

School of Public Health - Noontime film fest, Living the Good Life, See
No Evil, 12:10p.m., Aud., SPH II.
Cinema Guild - La Strada, 7, 9:05 p.m., Old Arch. Aud.
Ann Arbor Film Co-operative - Salesman, 7 p.m.; Roger Corman -
Hollywood's Angel, 8:45 p.m.; Nat. Sci. Aud.
MEETINGS
Michigan Economics Society - 5 p.m., 301 Econ.
Michigan Republican Club -7 p.m., Union Conference Rm. 5 & 6.
LSA-SG Curriculum Action Group -7 p.m., Union Conference Rm. 4.
Ann Arbor Advocates for Safe Alternatives in Childbirth - 7:30 p.m.,
Wesley Foundation Lounge, 602 E. Huron.
City Recreation Department - Men's City Fast Pitch meeting, 7:30
p.m., Lawton Elementary School auditorium.
Ann Arbor Democratic Party - Prof. Allen Whiting discussing
Afghanistan, 8 p.m., Public Library.
SPEAKERS
Continuing Education - Walter & Lucy McCrone, McCrone Research
Institute, 9 a.m., 4th floor Rackham.
Center for W. European Studies - Robert Escarpit, Le Monde, "The
French Media & the Crisis in Afghanistan," noon, 5208 Angell.
Dept. of Medical Care Org. - Stephen Eraker, "Patient Values in
Medical Decisions," noon, 3001 Vaughan Bldg.
Resource Pol. & Mgmt. - Samuel Hays, "The Politics of Health, Beauty
& Permanence: Shaping the Commons . .. with apologies to Schumaker and
Hardin," noon, 1028 Dana.
Ctr. for S. & SE. Asian Studies - Yu Insum, Michael Aung Thwin,
Chatchai Tanananon, "Slavery Bondage Dependency in Mainland SE Asia,"
2 p.m., 245 Lane Hall.
Dept. of Chemistry - Robert Ullman, "Small Angle Neutron Scattering
of High Polymers," 4 p.m., 1200 Chem. Bldg.
Hispanic-American Lecture Series - Angela Ginorio, "The Hispanic
Social Scientist; Ethnic Relations and Social Advancement," 4 p.m.,
Rackham Amphitheater.
Dept. of Near Eastern Stud. - Robert Alter, "Eros and Pathology in the
Fiction of S.Y. Agnon," 4 p.m., 3050 Frieze.
Physics/Astronomy - J. Shigemitsu, Institute for Advanced Study,
Princeton - "Strong Coupling Calculations of the Renormalization Group
Beta Function," 4 p.m., 2038 Randall.
Students' Counseling Office - Michigan Ass't. Attorney General, Melba
Copel, speaking on sexual harrassment at the University, 7 p.m., MLB
Lecture room 1.
Dept. of Chem. - Tak-Hang Chan, "Reactions of Enol Silyl Ethers," 8
p.m., 1300 Chem. Bldg.
Museum of Art - Guy Walton, "Versailles and the Eighteenth
Century," 8p.m., Angell Aud. a.
PERFORMANCES
Studio Theatre - "The Bedtime Story," 4:10 p.m., Arena Theatre,
Frieze-Bldg.
Guild House - poetry series, Bert Hornback, Leslie Bayern, 7:30 p.m.,
802 Monroe St.
School of Music - University Concert Band and Chamber Winds, 8 p.m.,
Hill; Piano Chamber Music, 8 p.m., Recital Hall.
Ars Musica -8 p.m., League Ballroom.
n nkndstae Cnffee Hnoe - musical entertainment U Cluh .Union 8

POETRY READING
with
Bert Hornback &
Leslie Bayern
reading from their works
Thurs.,Feb. 14 - 7:30 p.m.
REFRESHMENTS
ADMISSION FREE
GUILD HOUSE
802 Monroe

NOON LUNCHEON
Homemade Soup
& Sandwich 75ยข
Feb. 15
BARRY LYNN, chairperson,
National Committee Against Regis-
tration and the Draft:

i

"WHERE THE DRAFT
GUILD HOUSE
802 Monroe i

IS"

The public is cordially invited.
Please contact the Center for
Japanese Studies, 108 Lane Hall
(telephone 764-6307 or 763-4301),
for further information.

Thursday, Feb. 14,'1980
12-1:00 P.M.
200 Lane Hall
Washington & State Streets

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