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February 12, 1980 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-02-12

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Page 12-Tuesday, February 12, 1980-The Michigan Daily

U.S. officials link four deaths
to Medicaid abortion cutoff

.*it

WASHINGTON (AP) - At least four
poor women have died as a result of the
cutoff of practically all federal funds
for Medicaid abortions, according to
U.S. medical investigators.
Investigators for the federal Center
for Disease Control (CDC) in Atlanta
said they have identified eight other
deaths resulting from illegal or self-
induced abortions that could not be
linked to the termination of federal
financing of abortions. Two of the eight
were teenagers who were afraid to tell
their parents they were pregnant.
MEMBERS OF the CDC abortion
surveillance team said a common ef-
fect of the cutoff of federal funds in
August 1977 has been a delay in poor
women obtaining abortions, increasing
the risk of complications.
They also saw indications that some
poor women who would have had

government-assisted abortions are
having their babies instead.
CDC physicians said they at first ex-
pected to find many more deaths direc-
tly or indirectly linked to the cutoff of
funds under Congress' Hyde Amen-
dment, which restricts federal payment
for abortions to cases where the
mother's life is, in danger or the
pregnancy results from rape or incest.
THE DOCTORS expressed confiden-
ce in their count, however, although
they acknowledged it may not be up to
date.
The figures are lower than an-
ticipated, they said, because the vast
majority of women who would have
received federally assisted abortions
live in states that continue to pay for the
procedures.
A federal judge has ordered U.S.
authorities to resume abortion funding

)

Criler Arena
Ann Arbor

Initroductoiy Discussions
on the Bake faith
EVERY THURS. THRU FEB. 28
ba s'i Center, 512 Packard St.
7:30P.M.

on Friday. The Carter administration
plans to appeal his ruling to the
Supreme Court.
THE JUDGE, John Dooling Jr. 4
Brooklyn, found, in part, that the Hyde
Amendment increased the risk of
maternal deaths and caused some
women to seek illegal abortions. He
cited no cases, but 'CDC investigators
said they had identified the following
deaths:
. Rosie Jimeniz, 27, whose death in
Texas in 1977 after an illegal abortion
performed by a midwife has been
widely publicized as the first know
fatality resulting from the Hyde Amen-
dment.
" A 21-year-old Louisiana woman
who was eligible for health care under
the Medicaid program for the poor, but
who would not have been eligible for
abortion funding because Louisiana
stopped paying for abortions followingt
the federal fund cutoff.
Dr. Julian Gold, a member of the
CDC's abortion surveillance team who
investigated the case, said the woma
inserted three cotton swabs into he
uterus in an attempt to induce an abor-
tion because she had only $10 in the
bank and the abortion clinic three
blocks from her home charged $150. She
died of a massive infection.
" A 34-year-old Florida woman who
had had medical problems during
earlier pregnancies. She put off having
an abortion while she tried to find a
facility that would sterilize her at th
same time. She had a medicaid numb
and apparently believed Medicaid
would pay for her hospitalization if she
were sterilized, even if it wouldn't pay
for a simple abortion.
She then contracted pneumonia,
which further delayed the procedure,
and she died during a legally performed
abortion and sterilization that was
complicated by the month-long delay.
" A 37-year-old welfare mother in
Georgia who already had six children
and had told physicians and a soci4
worker she would attempt to induce
labor if they refused to help her. One
clinic rejected her, citing the Hyde
Amendment; another said she was too
far advanced in pregnancy and would
require hospitalization.
An investigation later indicated she
had not been too far advanced for a
simple outpatient procedure and had
the money to pay for one. However, she
returned home and after consulting
physician about a surgical sterilization
attempted to induce labor with a glass
thermometer. She died of a blood clot
that lodged in her lung.

MARCH

14

8pm

O

Tickets are 8.00 and 9.00 and are on sale now at the Michigan
Union Box Office (11:30-5:30), Aura Sounde, Wherehouse
Records, Huckleberry Party Store. Sorry, no checks.
For more information call 763-2071.

A Major Events Presentation

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
presents
CONCERTS AT NOON
February 13, 12:10 p.m., Lower Chapel
BARBARA WESE, Recorder
and Friends
February 21, 12:10 p.m., Lower Chapel
TINA MAKARA, Harpsichord
BRING YOUR OWN LUNCH ADMISSION FREE

A

I-

L

STAR

BAR

109 N. Main St.-769-0109
APPEARING TONIGHT:
CULTS HEROES'
"Ann Arbor's Original Honky Tonk Dance Bar"

Imagine Yourself A Career ...
Then Make It Happen At Honeywell

0

At Honeywell, you can turn your ambitious goals into a dynamic career. Our
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Located in Minneapolis, the Avionics Division designs, develops and manu-
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Primary needs of the Avionics Division are for BSEE candidates for Develop-
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positions exist for BS Computer Science candidates in real time mini-computer
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AVIONICS DIVISION-ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA
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Primary needs are for BS/MSEE and BSME candidates for Development,
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These environmental control systems use state-of-the-art technologies in
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The Commercial Construction Division is seeking BSEE/ME, Physics or Com-
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0

Primary needs are for BS, MS, or PHD in
candidates for advanced circuit design and
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EE, Physics or Materials Science
development involving a full range

REPRESENTATIVES FROM THESE DIVISIONS WILL BE
INTERVIEWING ON CAMPUS FEBRUARY 26TH.
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BILLERICA, MA
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S/MIS REPRESENTATIVE WILL BE INTERVIEWING
ON CAMPUS FEBRUARY 29TH.
Check with your placement office to verify recruiting dates and to sign on our

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