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February 12, 1980 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-02-12

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low IBM ON i "Milli 00011

Page 10--uesday, February 12,1980-The Michigan Daily
DePaul still No.

(AP) - Unbeaten DePaul was
the una lnous choice for the top
spot hm The Associated Press
college basketball poll for the
fourth consecutive week yester-
day as the top six teams
remaied the same and pre-_
season favorite Indiana fell out of
the elite 20 for the first time this
season.
Elsewhere in the Big 10, Ohio
State dropped four spaces.
TIlE BUCKEYES, ranked 13th
last week, collected 628 points
following triumphs over
Michigaf and Michigan State.
Clemson, which jumped from No.
16 to the Top 10 rafter upsetting
Marywld last week, got 462 poin-
ts in edging North Carolina for
the No. 10 spot.
Pfrtbedropped three spaces to
No. 15 while Iowa rejoined the top
20.

AP Top Twenty

1.-
2.
3.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

DePaul (58)........
Syracuse.........
Louisville........
Oregon St..........
Kentucky............
Louisiana St..........
St. John's, N.Y.......
Maryland ............
Ohio St...........
Clemson .............
N. Carolina........
Notre Dame ........ .
Brigham Young.. ...
Missouri ..........
Purdue..........
Duke...........
Weber St ...........
Arizona St..........
KansasSt,........
Iowa .................

20-0
21-1
21-2
22-2
21-4
18-4
21-2
17-4
16-5
17-5
16-3
16-4
18-4
16-4
13-6
17-6
21-2
17-3
18-4
16-5

1,160 .
1,047-
1,012
939
898 ~'4
874
774 .
749
628
462
437
433
409..:
403f,
332
298'
273
192
126
100

, v. " .,r "nrf: 5v Y.4 . f+. . $:${"a :. .G:" ' "t' ..... .. 9?~i: ;
Deadline For The
Nontraditional Fellowship
Is
March 14, 1980
Contct the Fellowship Office,
160 Rackham for details.
764-2218
The Residential Cellege Writers-in-Residence Progrem
PRESENTS A READING BY
LAURENCE YEP
Author of Sea Glass, Dragonwings (A Newberry Honor Book)
and Numerous Science Fiction Stories
TONIGHT 8 P.M. BENZINGER LIBRARY
(East Quad, East University between Hill & Willard)
THE PUBLIC IS CORDIALLY INVITED
A Reception for Laurence Yep will follow the reading.
The Residential Collge Writers-in-Residence Program is made possible by a
grant from the National Endowment for the Arts 9 Friends of the Residential
Colte...,

The Pittsburgh Panthers found out
yesterday that fat is not where it's at.
The Panther's heavyweight wrestler,
Steve Smocharski, tipped the scales at
425 pounds before Sunday's match with
Michigan, but even that wasn't enough
as Eric Klasson of the Wolverines
defeated Smocharski when the big guy
was disqualified for stalling.
It seemed a very fitting finale to a
superb performance by the Michigan
grapplers, as they thoroughly
humiliated Pitt, 46-0.
"IT'S THE first time that any
wrestling team that I have been
associated with has won by a shut-out,"
remarked assistant coach Joe Wells.
Perhaps the matmen were out to
redeem themslves before the home
crowd after being whipped by Michigan
State, 26-7, last Friday night. "The guys
wanted to show everyone that what
happened at State should not have hap-
pened,".said Wells. They obviously ac-
complished that.
The Blue matmen recorded two pins
en route to the victory, as Bill Petoskey
at 177 pounds took down Pitt's Jeff
Wilps at 4:36, and at 190 pounds, where
Steve Fraser of the Wolverines pinned
Kurt Karanovich at 7:49.
The blowout could be a very positive
influence for the grapplers as they
prepare for the upcoming Big Ten
championships.
-BUDDY MOREHOUSE
Synch swimmers
take tri-meet '
Michigan traveled to Bowling Green
State University for a tri-meet, com-
peting against Miami of Ohio and
Bowling Green in routine competition.
Michigan took first and second place
in all events entered and finished with
57 points. Miami finished with 21 points,
while Bowling Green finished last with
14 points.
Anyone is welcome to come to the
University of Michigan Invitational
Synchronized swimming meet next
week, February 16 at Margaret Bell
Pool. Michigan will be hosting Ohio
State, Iowa, Northwestern, Bowling
Green, and Michigan State. Routine
competition starts at 1:00 p.m.
Tracksters triumph
If women's track at the University of
Michigan was mentioned among
knowledgeable track buffs, the respon-
se used to consist of derision and polite
snikering. But after their recent suc-
cesses, including last Saturday's
triumph at the Central Michigan In-
vitational, the women tracksters have
transformed themselves, from a near
non-entity into a team to be reckoned
with in the Midwest.
When the team points were totalled
up last Saturday, the Wolverines had an
easy 127-991/3 point victory over their
nearest competitor, Central Michigan.
"They did exceptionally well," noted
Coach Ken Simmons of his small but
potent squad.
THE WOMEN scored in each event
they entered, usually placing in the top
three, as Catherine Sharpe paced the
Wolverines with a superlative win in
the 60-yard dash. Sharpe's time of 6.97
is one of the fastest in the country this
year, and only 3/10 of a second off of the
national record. Brenda Kazinec was a
step behind in 7.0, an equally im-
pressive time. Kazinec went on to win
the 220 in 26.13 later in the meet.

PITT 'HEAVIES' FLA TTENED:
Wrestlers shutout Panth ers, 46-0

In the mile, Sue Frederick, in her fir-
st attempt at this distance (she's
usually an 880/800m. runner), sped to a
5:06 clocking, good for first place;
teammate Julie Clifford followed in fif-
th with a 5:24.
Joanna Bullard qualified for the
national championships in the high
jump with a winning leap of 5'9". Sim-
mons is convinced she can go "several
inches higher." Another qualifying
mark was achieved by Lorri Thornton
with an 18'6" distance in the long jump,
which won the event over the 17'7/4"
mark registered by teammate Dede
Key.
MELAINE WEAVER was another
national qualifier as she came up with a
narrow victory in the two mile; her
10:45.6 was only 1.2 seconds ahead of
Western Michigan's Darcy Tomlinson.
The relays were dominated by Blue
teams, as they took second in the 4x880
and first in the 4x440. The Wolverines
lock horns with Central Michigan again
(this time in a dual meet) on Friday at
the Track and Tennis Building, 1:30
p.m.
-JOHN FITZPATRICK
Netters successful
There was a feeling of confidence in
the air at the Track and Tennis Building
Monday afternoon. The Blue netters
had returned from an eastern barrage
of highly ranked intercollegiate tennis
teams. If the National Indoor Keane
Championship in Princeton showed
anything, it was the ability of the net-
ters to recover strongly from an initial
Berkeley setback.
"The big win was over the.Georgia
Bulldogs Saturday night," stated
player Mike Leach. "We were up for
the match and gave a top performance.
Our top four singles players won and all
we needed was one double set to clinch
the match."
FIFTEENTH-ranked Michigan beat
tenth-ranked Georgia 5-4. This was the
final match of a three-day series. The
championship opened with a loss to a
powerful fourth-ranked Berkeley team
but turned around to a decisive 7-2 vic-
tory over twelfth-ranked Houston.
"Our club is scrappy," Leach further
states. "There are a lot of freshmen
playing, but they're tenacious, hard
workers. They've been playing out a lot
of tie breakers. The winning of tie
breakers makes a great team out of a
good team. We lack in that we don't-
play the top ten teams day in and day
out. For instance, when we played
Berkeley, we weren't used to that high
a calibre of playing."
The next meet will take place at home
this Saturday evening at 7:30 p.m. as
the Irish from Notre Dame roll into Ann
Arbor for their annual pre-season
clash. .
"NOTRE DAME is a good tennis
team. They're one of the few northern
teams to win the NCAA's. But we're
psyched to play them. It's a team
event."
-K.C. CHOTINER
Trackmen strong
in Relays
If last Saturday's Spartan Relays are
any indication of things to come, the
Michigan men's track team should be
in good shape as they point to the
championship meets of the indoor
season.
"We did well in all the relays," said
track coach Jack Harvey about the day

in East Lansing. Michigan won the
sprint medley in 3:25.7, and beat out
Western Michigan for a victory in the
mile relay for a time of 3:13.7.
MICHIGAN'S Dan Heikkinen ran an
8:42.7 in the invitational two-mile race,
which Harvey called "one of the fastest
collegiate times in the country."
Heikkinen took second to Herb Lindsay
of the Chicago Track Club, who finished
at 8:41.6.
Other Wolverine standouts were
James Ross, who sailed to victory in the
long jump by covering 24'4 ", and
Marshall Parks, who tied a school and
meet record in the 60-yd. high hurdles.
Parks shared a 7.2 clocking with Willie
Gault of Tennessee, who won the event.
In the 300-yd. run, Northwood In-
stitute's Kevin Jones (30.3) edged out.
Butch Woolfolk (30.6) to take first
place.
ABSENT FROM the meet was
Michigan's star high jumper Mike Lat-
tany. "But he'll jump this weekend,"
Harvey said, looking forward to the
Central Collegiate Championships here
in Ann Arbor.
The upcoming meet is a key one for
the team. "We're concerned with
scoring meets," said Harvey, "and we
have a good chance to win this one."
Teams from Penn State, Michigan
State, Western Michigan, and a dozen
other schools will insure excellent com-

petition, and Harvey expects to see
some NCAA qualifying performances.
Also, the Central Collegiate meet wil
be similar in format to the Big Tens;
and, Harvey says, "That's thle meet
we're shooting for."
Prelims for the weekend event start
at 6:00 this Friday, and finals at noon on
Saturday, in the track & tennis
building.
-CATHY LANDIS
Tankers top Bucks.
Saturday afternoon in Columbus, the
Michigan men's swim team posted a
convincing 76-36 victory over the Ohio
State Buckeyes, The win improved
Michigan's dual meet record to 5-1, and
4-1 against Big Ten teams.
"With just Michigan State left on the
(dual meet) schedule we're aiming for
the Big Ten Meet in March," stated fir-
st-year Michigan coach Bill Farley.
"Our guys swam pretty well Saturday,
though."
ONE OF those "guys" was
sophomore Tom Ernsting. Ernsting
won the 100-yard breaststroke with a
time of :59.607.
All-American junior Fernando
Canales (:51.521) teamed with-
sophomore Scott Crowder (:51.787) and
junior Tom Pederson (:61.961) in a
strong 1-2-3 finish in the 100- butterfly.
-JON MORELAND

Out of the lue
By Geoff Larcom

lA Masters Degree in
RADIATION PROTECTION
at the University of Michigan
O rprtunitIes Available for:
i-Rnncial support for qualified graduate student
..*estarch in radiation dosimetry and radiation biology
) g-paying, interesting jobs in a growing profession in
which the demand for graduates for exceeds the supply.
APPLICATION SHOULD BE FILED BY: 15 MAY 1980
: twsested students in engineering, physics, biology,. chem-
is"ry, pre-med., or any of the other physical or biological
sciences should write:
Dr. G. Whipple, Department of Environmental and Industrial
H.e W, School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Mi 48109.

J

POSTIONOPENING FOR 1980-81
RESIDENT D/REOR FOR ACADEMICS
I1E PILOTPROGRAM/ALICE LOYD HALL
DUTIES INCLUDE:
-Coordinate administration of Pilot Academic
Program
Teach undergraduate course
-Coordinate teacher training
COMPENSATION:
-Apartment and board
-$1749 per year for administrative duties (at
current rates; subject to revision)
-.25 GSTA appointment per term ($1284 at
current rates)
-Married applicants are welcome.
For more information call David Schoem, Pilot Program
Direcor (764-7521)
Application Deadline: February 22

Olympic dream .. .
... No politics
It certainly appears safe to say that the prospect of American participa-
tion in Moscow's Olympic extravaganza is all but extinct.
The worth of an American Olympic boycott has been debated to the point
of exhaustion, with strong legislative, media and public sentiment quickly
aligning behind President Carter's policy.
Suggestions from the United States' leadership for preserving this
summer's competition in some form include switching the site of the 1980
games, or providing for an alternative games, in which nations siding with
the American initiative would compete.
Butsat this point the first course of action is unfeasible, the second
largely unsatisfactory.
As has been extensively noted, the Soviet government has dug deep into
its pocket in an effort, to legitimize its system through a spectacular
Olympiad. A switch of sites by the International Olympic Committee at this
time would seem to constitute support of the American stand, while
damaging the Soviets significantly.
Of necessity IOC head Lord Killanin is maintaining his stand that the
Olympics must not bend to political considerations, particularly to the
extent the United States seeks to have them do so. The IOC thus states there
will be a Moscow Olympics this summer or none at all.
Meanwhile an alternate games could in no way compare in significance
with the fourth-year Olympiad. A Games lacking either Russian or
American athletes is essentially only half the conpetition it could be. As
many athletes readily attest, a victory in an alternate games loses much of
its luster.
The honor of a gold medal is beautiful in its meaning and simplicity. It is
the ultimate single tribute to individual athletic prowess.
I frankly cannot see an alternate competition amounting to much more
than a glorified version of the various competitions that dot weekend
television.
Furthermore, my guess is that our actions have put the 1984 Summer
Games, slated for Los Angeles, in peril as well. It's difficult to envision
future summer Games free from the type of political expression the United
States is so dramatically and adamantly setting forth.
Thus, the time is right to re-examine what the Games should stand for, to
reevaluate their emphasis and staging.
The argument that the Olympics are presently not above politics is
valid. Yet the structure of past games has paved the way for the political
monster to become the very dominant force it is today.
The Olympics are the ideal stage for aggressive nationalistic hopes to be
played out. From Hitler's Berlin in 1936 to the 1972 terrorist slaughter of
Israeli athletes in Munich, we've seen this to be sadly true.
Athletes are too often viewed as legitimizing agents of their country's
system, not the individual talents that they are. They themselves compete
not to aggrandize their country, but rather for the love of high-level
competition and their sport.
Such distinctions as "Eastern" and "Western" have little to do with an
athlete's perception of what he is up against in an event.
Yet each event's finish is succeeded by the emotional and superfluous
playing of the winner's national anthem. Daily medal standings, comparing
each nation's successes, dominate media Olympic coverage. American
coverage of recent games has dwelt upon our own athletes, while skilled
colorful competitors such as Cubans Teofilo Stevenson and Alberto
Juantorena, along with Soviet sprinter Valery Borzov, have been largely
ignored.
For sheer survival's sake, the Games must now be de-politicized to some
extent. The suggestion of a permanent, neutral site such as Greece, Sweden
or Switzerland would, I think, solve much of the problem.
The United States, itself contributing considerably, could seek the
financing for permanent winter and summer facilities. Hopefully such an
action would effectively undermine future efforts to turn the Olympics into
a decidedly political event.
The chief argument for a variation of sites is that it enables the athletes
to see different lands and cultures first hand.
The loophole here is that rarely does a person participate in more than
two games, an exceptional athletic feat. Those who'd benefit primarily
would be the media, the very affluent and permanent Olympic officials-not
the athletes, for whom the ancient competition was created.
The bottom line in the Olympics, what comprises their enormous and
unique appeal for the athlete and spectator, is competition between the
world's best.

0

09

The Ann Arbor Film Coopestive Presenis.at Aud. A: $1.50
GET OUT YOUR HANDKERCHIEFS
(Bertrand Blier, 1978) 7, 8:40 & 10:20-AUD. A
From the some people who brought you GOING PLACES, this is the story of a
young man who gives his lethargic wife to another man in an attempt to cheer
her up, only to have her leave them both for a 13-year-old boy. Academy
Award winner for best foreign film, GET OUT YOUR HANDKERCHIEFS features
absurd humor, a sensational seduction scene and music by Mozart.
THE DEER HUNTER has been postponed until April 16
Tomorrow: GET OUT YOUR HANDKERCHIEFS at Aud. A and CASABLANCA
at the Michigan Theatre.

1

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Take a
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