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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 12, 1980 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-02-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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THE.

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Page 6-Tuesday, February 12, 1980-The Michigan Daily
Opera star Price triumphs

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BY SHELLEY WOLSON
Leontyne Price swept into Hill
Auditorium last Saturday night and lent
her stylish touch to a program ranging
from Bach to spirituals in an evening of
pleasure for the ear.
Price contributed infinite amounts of
energy, and exquisite expression to
every note in each selection, and ap-
peared to heartily enjoy herself while
doing it. Perhaps the only flaws in th
entire program were the program
selections themselves. While each piece
was performed inpeccably, the
program lacked the classical arias
which one would expect. Indeed, the
high point of the performance was
Price's gorgeous rendition of "Un 'bel
di" from Madame Butterfly and her
more traditional selections for her en-
cores.
BUT PRICE beautifully demon-
strated her versatility, regardless.
With the program's first half
dominated by short works of Richard
Strauss, she made shrewd use of her
carefully controlled, rich voice and en-
tranced the audience with luscious
changes in mood, tempo and sen-
sitivity. Price appeared to enjoy
Strauss' "Schlageride Herzen" as
much as the audience, delighting in
every lilting run. Then with ease she
flowed into the tranquil, solemn mood
of Strauss' "Freundliche Vision."
Price captivated the audience with
her breathtaking, emotional version of
"Un bel di," the most famous aria from
Puccini's Madame Butterfly and
brought many audience members to
their feet.for an ovation.
THE PERFORMER began the
second half of her program with four
Paul Eluard poems set to music by
Francis Poulenc. Again Price showed
her versatility, expressing just the
right amount of romance and mystery
that Poulenc injected into his work.
After the Poulenc set, Price delivered
five musical poems from Samuel Bar-
ber with great intensity. She lent each
piece the sense of melancholy and
poignancy so necessarytorthe haunting
intonalities of Barber's works.
FROM THIS discordant and difficult

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Ieontyne Price displayed her vocal talents at Hill Auditorium Saturday
night in a program that ranged from traditional operatic material to such
unexpected additions as the performer's favorite spiritual.

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group of pieces, Price ended her
program with two spirituals, only to
come back for four encores. Giving
opera lovers what they were craving
for, she sang the final dramatic aria
from Madame Butterfly, and "Vissi
d'Arte" from Puccini's Tosca.
Price should have ended with her
thirdiencore, whose final note left
audience ears ringing. But she came
back for one more her "mother's

favorite spiritual" - "This Little Light
of Mine." After this number, the
audience let her go quite easily, having
had their earlier hunger for good opera
pieces satiated to some degree.
But in spite of the lack of many
traditional works, Price soared through
her diverse program to 'give a
thoroughly enjoyable performance
which should have satisfied opera
fanatics and the uninitiated alike.

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By GILLIAN BOLLING
Between movies, bars and parties
there are plenty of things .t da in Ann
Arbor on a Friday or Saturday night.
But what about Sunday afternoons? If
you don't feel like studying (and who
does?), I heartily recommend "Sunday
Afternoon Music at the Loft."
This past Sunday afternoon, the Can-
terbury Loft featured a flautist and
classical guitarist. They played for an
hour, doing six pieces specifically writ-
ten for or adapted to a flute and
classical guitar duet.
NANCY WARING, the flautist, has
studied the instrument for 21 years. She
exhibited an exquisite feel for her
music through masterful breath control
and amazing agilefingering. Difficult
passages with trills and scales flowed
smoothly. Waring's precise delivery
was relaxed and confident yet also
friendly and inviting.
Michael Casher, on classical guitar,
played beautifully when accompanying
the flute and performing alone. On
"Prelude no. 4 and Etude no. 8," both
for solo guitar by Hector Villa-Lobos,
Casher caressed the notes. He - con-
trolled variances in sound and
volumen, playing hushed tones and
then skipping to lively and powerful
passages.
BEFORE EACH selection, the per-
formers told a short history of the piece
and the composer, which was a
welcome addition to the program.
Among the six selections were "A
Sonata for Flute and Guitar" by Ernst

Gottlieb Baron, "A Sonatina for Flute
and Guitar" by Mario Castelnuovo
Tedesco and perhaps the best-known,
"Pavane pour une Infante Defunte" by
Maurice Ravel. The Ravel piece, shortt
and very sweet, exhibited especially
well that the flute and guitar are won-
derfully complementary.
Waring, who received both her
bachelor's and master's degrees from
the U-M school of music, and Casher,
who studied privately, have been
playing together for about a year. They
both project. a love of music and for
the flute and guitar, which makes their
technically accurate performance even
more enjoyable. Their timing was ex-
cellent, throughout the afternoon, but
particularly fine on Tedesco's "Rondo
and the Rondeau" from Jan Maarten
Komter's Divertimento in G major.
They followed and led one another in a
playful manner, as if playing a musical
game of tag.
CANTERBURY LOFT provided just
the right setting for. the small, cozy
concerts. The listeners sat in chairs and
on pillows forming a semi-circle around
the musicians who were softly lit by
track lighting.
Unfortunately, the informal at-

jamin Franklin.

0

mosphere also presented a few
problems. Some young children, who
should have been left at h6me, were an-
noyingly noisy. Banginig heating ducts
and ringing phones provided other un-
necessary irritations, distracting to
both the musicians and the listeners.
Overall the surroundings were very
comfortable and the mood was
relaxing. The next concert is scheduled
for February 24 at 4:00 p.m. where the
Ann Arbor Consort of Violas will
present an afternoon of chamber
music.
Bifocal eyeglasses, with the upper
part for Viewing distant objects and the
lower for near, were invented by Ben-

I

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