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February 09, 1980 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-02-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

MICHIGAN TECH IN TOWN

Dekers face-off against Huskies

By MARK BOROWSKI
ou probably remember when your
other used to tell you there is no place
like home. And you probably also
remember not believing a word.
Well, the Michigan hockey team is
now a believer. After losing three of
four on the road the Wolverines return
home to Yost Ice Arena for a Saturday-
Sunday series with Michigan Tech.
WHY ARE THEY believers?
, cause Yost has been a friendly
mate for the second-place
Wolverines (10-7-1),in the WCHA this
season. While at home the icers have
gone unbeaten in all 15 regular season
contests and now hold the record for the
longest unbeaten streak.
Michigan coach Dan Farrell offers
two reasons for the .slide on the road
and hopes the home ice will work to his
team's advantage.,
*'We played on the road, that's one
problem and we played without
(Murray) Eaves two.of the games and
he was probably coming down with it
(mononucleosis) in the other two
games. Playing away from home is a
different environment and we didn't
react very well.

"WE'RE A MUCH better team at
home than on the road, at least we have
been so far. I think it makes a
difference," he said.

the Wolverines the Tech Huskies have
not been very friendly at all. Tech has
swept Michigan in their last 10
meetings. But its coach John MacInnes
doesn't feel there is a secret to his
success against Michigan.
"THINGS GO in cycles. You hit a
team you're successful against that
maybe you shouldn't be and I think that
is the case with Michigan. In the last few
years against Michigan State and
Minnesota-Duluth we probably should
have beat them more than we did. It all
balances out in the end," he said.
And this series also brings an
opportunity for MacInnes to become
the winningest coach in college hockey
history. He won his 500th game last
weekend by defeating league-leading
North Dakota at Houghton and a win
this weekend will tie him with former
Boston College coach John "Snooks"
Kelley the winningest coach.
But MacInnes doesn't feel his quest
for 502 victories will have an effect on
the atmosphere of the series. "It
doesn't have a personal effect on me. If
you keep coaching and your team plays
well you are eventually going to get to
that mark," MacInnes said.
THE SEVENTH-PLACE Huskies will
be missing the services of their captain
Gerg Hay, who, sustained a knee injury
in the first period of last Saturday's
game, and senior Gordon Salt.

The two teams met in the finals of the
Great Lakes Invitational Tournament
(GLIT) last December and Tech won
the game in triple overtime. Farrell
thought his team did everything it could
despite the loss.
"We outplayed them (in the GLIT).
When you go into three overtime
periods anybody can win no matter how
well you've played. I would like to think
that the home ice advantage and
getting back to basics will help us have
a successful weekend," Farrell said.
"We owe them two."-
Saturday night's game will start at
7:30 p.m. and Sunday's will start at 2:00
p.m.

The Michigan Daily-Saturday, February 9, 1980-Page 9
Blue tankers meet
overmatched OSU
By MIKE WERNER'
Men's swimming coach Bill Farley said that today's meet between his
Wolverines and the Ohio State Buckeyes would tell him a lot about his team
Farley has already seen a lot of quality swimming this season as five
Michigan swimmers have already qualified for the NCAA championship
meet in Boston. Farley expects that "about seven or eight" other members
of the squad will qualify before the regular season ends.
Indeed, this team is loaded with talent like Bob Murray and Fernando
h Canales, two swimmers who won events last year at the Big Ten champion-
ship meet. They also won the 50 and 100 yard free-style events; respectively,
last week against North Carolina State. Farley however, says "There are no
stars on this team. We're very strong and deep in all free-style events, and
have good quality in the stroke events."
Despite the fact that Ohio State is not known as a swimming power, the
: Wolverines aren't taking the meet lightly. Michigan is looking to improve
their record to 8-1 and possibly overtaking Indiana for the Big Ten conferen-
.1 ce lead. And, as Farley explained, "There's always a rivalry when Michigan
plays Ohio State in any sport."
The Wolverine swimmers are using their upcoming meets'as preparation
for the Big Ten Championships to be held in Michigan's Matt Mann Pool in
March. Farley believes that by working hard throughout the season, a team
will be at its peak in March for the Big Ten and National Championship
meets.

WCHA
Standings

Baseotto

..: freshman sensation
By returning home one of Farrell's
problems is solved, but he said he is still
unsure whether or not the nation's
leading scorer Eaves will play.
Although Yost has been friendly to

North Dakota......
MICHIGAN ........
Notre Dame.......
Minnesota........
Colorado College ...
Wisconsin ..........
Michigan Tech .....
Michigan State .....
Minnesota-Duluth ..
Denver ......... .

w
13
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9
9
6

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6
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9
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Pct.
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.583
.550
.542
.521
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the Cout

.,arE

BACK ON TRACK

McNamara seeks to regain form

By MARTHA CRALL
When told there was going to be a
feature story on her, Katie McNamara
looked me straight in the eye and
calmly said, "Why?"
elieve it or not there was a genuine
iosity on her part. The Katie Mc-
Namara that Michigan fans have seen
this season is not the Katie McNamara
who won All-American status at Our
Lady of Mercy High School in Detroit,
nor is it the freshman starter of 1978-79
who averaged 15.6 points per game.
IT IS A more reflective, mature Mc-
Namara who is concerned about her
kerformance this year which includes
much reduced 6.9 points per game.
Her slump is much more than a sudden
lack of accuracy or hustle, however.
Assistant coach Margo Plotzke ex-
plains, "Katie is a very sensitive girl
who is under a lot-of pressure."
Plotzke continued, "She has run into
kind of a sophomore slump, but we're
confident that it's just a matter of time
before Katie is back on the track."
ALTHOUGH McNamara says she
Ae ls no pressure, it is still there and
she's not playing her kind of game. Her
concentration and intensity are a little
off, which, in turn, adversely affects
her game.
When she does get in the swing, Plot-
zke thinks her tremendous amount of
talent could win her All-American
status at Michigan.
McNamara 's "sophomore jinx" may
be a big part in why the Wolverines are
l5 so far this season. At this point in
at was considered a dismal season
for the hoopsters last year, the
Wolverines were 11-10.
SEVERAL OF the losses this season
have been by five points or less, and ac-
cording to Plotzke a normal McNamara
p.p.g. average could have made a big
difference in the standings at this point.
Katie says she's satisfied with what
the University has offered her so far
ademically. But doubts about a
lmmunications major prompted Mc-
Namara to recently switch to a double

physical education-psychology major.
She hopes for a future in the relatively
new and open field of executive fitness.
ASKED HOW an emotional coach like
head coach Gloria Soluk affected her,
McNamara replied, "I tune out the
emotions of others and just play my
own kind of game. Sometimes that's
good and sometimes it's bad."
Whether or not she tunes out her
coach's emotions, Katie McNamara is
always in the game. She is aggressive,

presents
SATURDAY
a s a
NO COVER
theCount
4 r ipajto
1140 South Un iversity

but ever since her promotion to college
basketball, she's been labeled weak
defensively.
Whereas in high school she could play
in a zone defense and do a lot of
shooting outside, now the opponents
and strategy are much different. In a
situation where McNamara has to be
inside, and because she is small, are
reasons why she gets pushed around.
With time, though, that may improve,

too.
FOr now, McNamara's and the whole
team's work is cut out for them. It is the
coaches' consensus that with time
things will work themselves back into
place for McNamara.
If you had wondered if Katie Mc-
Namara had faded into the
background, worry not. She is very
determined and if desire and sincerity
count, she'll make it back up to the top.

.,

14

Blue tumblers host
Indlana Hoosiers
By LEE KATTERMAN that a few of his gymnasts sti]
After the men's gymnastics team add some new tricks to meet
defeated Illinois, 265.65-259.0, Michigan requirements. Until these addi
coach Newt Loken said his squad was perfected, their scores won'
"capable of scoring 270." Further, if these recent improvements.
the Wolverines hope to be selected for But for the casual spectator,
April's NCAA Championships, they'll not be clear just where Michi
probably need to meet Loken's expec- pick up the points needed to get
tations.
to the top ten gymnastics tean
The most recent Collegiate Gym- nation.
nastics Coaches Statistical Report lists Michigan's four best scores,
nine teams with scores over 270, and meets with Ohio State, Min
Michigan has moved down to a twelfth Stfd and UCLA, average
place tie with Minnesota. With 3/2 ortan hortdU Aheragen
weeks and four more dual meets until t a i3 shcoe of to 27ng Lo
the Big Ten Championships, the temicablofoaig.L
Wolverinesstill find themselves four indicated that the most likely s
polt short of oken'sgo ls these points is parallel bars a
horse. If these two events can ad
Michigan's next opportunity to reach two more points to the curren
for a scoex op270 r(which, ncden- scores, and the other four even
for a team score of 270 (which, ciden-u with on another coule te
tally, requires a 9.0 average for the point, Loken said he'd have fis+
thirty individual scores that comprise 270.
the team total) is this afternoon at 5:30,
when Indiana comes into Crisler Arena
to face the Wolverines.
SCORES
Now the Hoosiers, even if they do ex- ColRege Basketball
tremely well, are not very likely to Pace 81, C.W. Post 74
score above 260, since their best score Trinity 68, Bowdoin 52
this season is a 254.70 in their meet with Brown 72, Columbia 71
Michigan State. N. Dakota 59, N. Colorado 57
N.C. Central 69. Morgan St. 61
So how do the Wolverine gymnasts, Pro Basketball,
without the boost of stiff competition, Los Angeles 125, New Jersey Nets 120
make headway at the 270 benchmark? Boston 130, Indiana 108
Phoenix 113. Chicago 109
According to Loken, theteam mem- NHL Results
bers are well aware of how they stand Colorado4, Hartford4
among the leaders. "Competition isECHANC
really with teams throughout the presents
nation," said Loken, "no matter who ROOT BOY SLIM
the meet is with that week." SEX H E
Loken said his team is determined to
improve its team total, but cautions Changedfor theBetter

[1 plan to
judging
tions are
t reflect
it might
gan will
back in-
ns in the
from the
nnesota,
to 265.65
said his
ken has
ource of
and side
Ad about
nt event
ts come
nths of a
coveted

Hungry
\ l \ C

mt night?
4
FREE
SNACKS
ANYTIME
INCO-OPS
Find out more at
NEW MEMBERS
MEETING
Sunday, Feb. 17
1:00 p.m.
MICHIGAN UION
Kuenzel Room
Followed by open houses
662-4414

Inter-Cooperative Council
4002 Michigan Union, Box 66, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109

KateMc amara
Netters win in N.J.

special to The Daily
PRINCETON, N.J.-Rebounding
from an opelhing-round loss Thursday,
Michigan men's tennis team
bipped 12th-ranked Houston, 7-2,
yesterday in the Michelob Lite
Collegiate Team Tournament here.
The Wolverines' top two singles
players, Matt Horwitch and Michael
Leach, both were defeated in three sets,
but Michigan prevailed in the
remaining seven matches.
Recording victories were freshman
Mark Mees (third singles), co-captains
Jud Shaufler and Jack Neinken (fourth
Idfifth, respectively) and Ann Arbor
tive Tom Haney, another first-year
player.
THE DOUBLES TEAMS of Horwitch
and Leach, Mees-Shaufler 'and
Neinken-Dan McLaughlin all won their
matches handily.
On Thursday, the 15th-ranked
Wolverines were trounced, 8-1, by Cal-

Berkeley. Only the first doubles tandem
of Horwitch and Leach triumphed over
the Golden Bears, who are ranked
fourth nationally.
Michigan faces either Georgia or
Utah this afternoon. Both schools are
among the Top Twenty.

W HEN: FEBRUARY 16, 080
1:00 P.M. to 1:00 A.M.

In the Interest of Building An International Teamwork System and in
conjunction with the celebration of Black History Month
BAITS HOUSING RESIDENTIAL STAFF
PRESENTS
WOMEN: AWARENESS
A Week of Women's Issues

WHERE:
1ST PRIZE
from, tech hifl

MARKLEY HALL

Nikko HN-1E Receiver
Philips GA-222 Tuetabie
Tilt Loudspeakers
AudioTechnics AT-90. Cartridge

Jack Neinken

Women and Violence
Black Women
Women and Our
Bodies

SUNDAY, February 10th: Coman Lounge
Domestic Violence: 7:00 PM
Rape Preventionz; 9:00 PM
MONDAY, February 11th: Eaton Lounge
Guest Speakers with Karen Cottiedge
Panel Discussion: 7:00 PM
TUESDAY, February 12th: Thieme Lounge
Birth Control: 7:00 PM
Abortion issues: 9:00 PM

The school raising the largest amount of money will
win the Little Brown Bottle" trophy. Sponsored by
Budweiser and the Muscular Dystrophy Association.
For more Information contact: Bob Krinsky-764-4928
Registration Required
at Hill Dorms

f)cntAI i nc Fnr Tka

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