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February 09, 1980 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-02-09

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The Michigan Doily-Saturday, February 9, 1980-Page 7

Windfall tax could feed inflation

WASHINGTON (AP) - Barring
some unexpected last-minute accom-
nodation by Senate and House con-
erees, President Carter may have to
choose between continuing his anti-in-
flation policies and winning passage of
the windfall profits tax.
The conference committee working
on Carter's windfall profits tax is
leaning heavily toward writing a bill
that would return at least half of the
revenue from the windfall tax to in-

dividuals and corporations in the form
of an income tax cut.
THE TAX CUT could total $125 billion
or more in the 1980s, depending on how
quickly oil prices rise.
But an income tax cut flies in the face
of Carter's economic policy. The
president's advisers say any action now
to cut taxes could worsen the budget
deficit and feed inflation.
If Carter's feelings against a tax cut
are strong enough, he could veto the

bill. But that would delay - and could
kill - the entire windfall tax, which is
the financing mechanism for the
president's energy program and the
sugar-coating for his decision to end
price controls on U.S. crude oil.
More likely, Carter could accept the
package and focus his efforts on
delaying or watering down the sub-
sequent legislation that would actually
reduce taxes. For example, Congress
could vote a tax cut in this election year

but delay its effective date until
January 1982. That could deliver the
promise of tax relief without worsening
the $15-billion budget deficit forecast
for 1981.
The rough draft of the bill worked out
in conference so far would spend 10 per
cent or about $22.7 billion of the windfall
revenues on synthetic energy. That
figure is much less than the $88 billion
Carter recommended for synthetic
fuels development and the $16 billion he
recommended for transportation.

T0KE THE LEAD
Help New Students Discover
the Diversity of Michigan
BE (q FEILL
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LEAqDER
Pick up applications at the
Orientation Office (2530 SAB) from
Mon. Jan. 28 to Fri. Feb. 22, 1980
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a

Carter:

Women's Studies change urged
(Continued from Page 1)

women to
regis te r.
for draft
(Continued from Page 1)
CARTEtR, WHO announced his plan
to revive the draft registraion program
last month in his State of the Union
address, linked the need for
registration directly to the Soviet move
into Afghanistan last December.
"This brutal act of aggression had
alled forth the condemnation of the
whole world-and a series of firm and
measured responses from the United
States," he said.
Furthermore, he added, registration
"will improve our capacity, if
circumstances require, to increase the
size and strength of our armed forces."
ALTHOUGH HE said, he was "very
much aware of the concern that many
Americans feel about the issue of
women in combat," he added that
onany jobs in the military do not involve
hazardous roles.
Women currently are not assigned to
combat units, Carter explained,
adding, "I have no intention of'
changing that policy."
White House officials said, however,
that the administration would redefine
combat roles to allow women greater
chances at promotion in the military.
ACTUAL REGISTRATION of young
men probably will begin this summer,
after Congress appropriates the extra
$20.5 mi lion e president has
requested for the Selective Service
system to implement his plan.
The Selective Service system has
been dormant since registration ended
in 1975. The draft ended in June 1973
after the conclusion of the U.S.
involvement in Vietnam.
White House officials acknowledge
the difficulty that registration of
women faced on Capitol Hill, but were
optimistic nevertheless.
"THAT'S A FIGHT we are prepared
to wage," said Stuart Eizenstat, the
president's domestic policy adviser. He
conceded the congressional Armed
Serveies committees opposed the
proposal, but he speculated the full
House and Senate would be more
receptive.
Under Carter's proposal, registration
would work this way:
Nineteen-and 20-year-olds would go to
a local post office and fill out a form
giving their-name, address, date of
birth, and Social Security number.
Beginning next year, people would
register around their 18.i birthday. The
forms would be checked at postal
windows.

The report also stated that the money"
currently used to pay TAs should be
redistributed to allow the program to be
able to "buy" faculty members from
departments that are hesitant to allow
their faculty to teach outside their
home departments.
Ellen Ilfeld, who is a doctoral can-
didate in English and taught in the
Women's Studies Program last
semester, said it would be very difficult
to recruit faculty from other depar-
tments because women professors who
become involved in the program may
jeopardize their chances for tenure by
splitting their time between two
departments.
"IF YOU SPEND 20 hours per week
in the Women's Studies Program, that's
20 fewer hours spent in your primary
department,' Ilfeld explained. "A
woman will lose out to a man who can
spend all his time in one department,"
she added.
The results of a questionnaire
circulated by the review committee
indicated that few faculty currently on
campus are willing to develop or teach
courses in the program. Thirteen
faculty members expressed interest in
teaching a Women's Studies course,
according to the report.
TAs should be phased out over
several years, the report concluded,
even though the committee reported
the program's TAs were of
exceptionally high quality.
THE COMMITTEE also recom-
mended that .Frye and the Women's
Studies Executive Committee consider
cutting the number of course offerings
and transferring some of the TAs to
research assignments. This would
facilitate, the report said, changing
the programs' priorities from teaching
to research.

The procurement of outside funds
would be necessary to implement the
transition because it would be
unrealistic for the program to expect
additional funding from the Dean,
according to the report.
"I think that the University should
provide additional funds for research,
and not cut back on the teaching," said
Ilfeld. "The University should be a
place where a student can come and
learn. The program received an
enthusiastic response from the students

.;.

and it shouldn't be weakened."
The report also suggest that Women's
Studies students develop a more direct
relationship with other departments,
and that the program should work
aggressivley to get other departments
to offer courses relating to women.
Also recommened are stronger ties
between the Women Studies Program
and the Center for Continuing
Education for Wokmen, more publicity,
and a definition of the program's goals
and needs.

71

'

Student views differ
on draft proposal

GoodTie Ca~y
announces
The
First Annual
Spce Invaders Capos,
When: SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17 1980
Times: QUALIFYING ROUND.- 1pm-Spm
FINALS-9pm-midnight
RULES: 1. Limited to first 100 applicants
2. Applicants must be 18 to enter.
Proper identification required.
3. Applicants will pay for their own games.
4. Qualifying round will consist of 3 games. Total
score of these games will be considered for the
finals. Sixteen contestants with the highest 3-
game total will compete in the finals.
5. No entry fee. Entries can be submitted (to the
Good Time Charley's bar) no earlier than 2:00
p.m. Monday, February 11, 1980 and no later than
5:00 p.m. Saturday, February 16, 1980.
FIRST PRIZE
NAME
ADDRESS
PHONE
DATE/TIME

x'

(Continued from Page 1)
going to have registration though,
women should be included, but not
combat duty."
Eric Hagemeister, an LSA freshman,
agreed with Bartlett. "I'm for it - the
registration at least. We should be
ready now that times are changing. I
don't think women should be put on the
front," he said.
Kristie Robinson, an LSA sophomore,
wholeheartedly supported Carter's
proposal. "I think .it's wonderful. I'm
not pro-war, but I am pro-registration. I
think this bullshit peace movement of
the sixties has got togo -gthis isn't
Nam. People are anti-registration
because it's fashionable - I'm not
fashionable.
"If my brother goes to war, I want to
go. If women didn't go, that means over
the past 20 years we've been working
for nothing," she added.
Some people felt, however, that
passage of the Equal Rights Amen-
dment (ERA) has crucial to having
women register.
.~v'i ~I. _ IN* .

"I think women are just as capable as
men if they want to be, but I don't think
we should have it (registration of
women) until ERA passes," Dianne
Isley, a Pharmacy School sophomore,
said.
"I'm not against women fighting,"
Jenny Hoff, an LSA freshwoman said,
"'but if we don't have ERA we can't be
expected to be drafted."
Women's registration was entirely
opposed by some.
Beth Maggio, an LSA freshwoman,
said, "I don't think women should go to
war. I don't think women would do well.
It may be stereotypical, but I don't
think it's in their nature."
"I oppose registration of women,"
David Morgan, an LSA senior said.

'U.

Use Daily
Class ifieds.

WERNER HERZOG'S 1973
AGUIRRE, THE WRATH OF GOD
Herzog's spectacularly horrifying chronicle of imperialism gone amok,
AGUIRRE is the tale of a 16th century quest for a Peruvian El Dorado. KLAUS
KINSKI (Nosferatu) as a power-driven lunatic, is the perfect protagonist for
this descent into madness. The tilm is tilled with images that seize the imag-
ination and haunt for days. German with English subtitles.
Sunday: THE MAN WHO LAUGHS
Monday: THE MALTESE FALCON

CINEMA GUILD

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