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February 08, 1980 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-02-08

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LEON ICHASO and ORLANDO JIMENEZ-LEAL's 191
EL SUPER
Based on the award-winning play of Ivan Acosta. Musical -score and direction
by Enrique Ubieta. Filmed on location. Rarely has the everyday life of Man-
hattan been captured with as much drama and humor as in this remarkable
film of the Cuban-American community. Raymundo Hidago-Gato plays a
beleagured tenement super, trapped in the urban ghetto and clinging to a
way of family life that is disappearing under Americanization. His wife indeed
lives in the Cuban past, while his teenage daughter, in no way naive about
sex and drugs, is forced to lead a double life. "Produced with care, intel-
ligence, and with a cast of marvelous Cuban and Puerto-Rican actors."
-Vincent Canby.
Sat.: AGUIRRE, TKE WRATH OF GOD
CUTONIGHT AT OLD ARCH. AUD.
CINEMA GUILD 7:00& 9:05 $1.50

7a

Page 8-Friday, February 8, 1980-The Michigan Daily
Do a Tree
a Favor: G
RervO a

USED FOR BRAINE VOLUTION RESEARCH
tor bowl i n Nat. Sei.

Your Daily

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Graduatinrs
:,:: Eng

By SHEILA STREET
Pssstt. Hey you. Want to see something interesting?
From State Street, walk east on North University to the
Natural Science Building, Step onto the grass and look
down into the first window facing west. And there they are.
Alligators.
SURE AS TUITION increases, there are 13 alligators in a
long tin tub in the ground floor of the Nat. Sci., bathed in red
light, slow-moving, and clearly visible to passing
pedestrians.
According to R. Glenn Northcutt, a professor of
Comparative Neuroanatomy, they are the subjects of a
research project that is studying the evolutional differences
in the brain structure of vertebrates. Northcutt said the.
alligator is important in this type research because it is the
only living animal that is related to the bird and the
dinosaur. Its brain-the largest of all reptiles-is similar
and as complicated as that of the bird.
The alligators range from two to three feet in length, and
contrary to many opinions, are not slimy but have soft

leathery skin. Northcutt said that a 20-year-old alligator
can grow to a length of eight to nine feet, adding that there
is one documented case of a 21-foot alligator.
NORTHCUTT EXPLAINED the alligators have been
used by the University for 12 years. They are obtained from
the Game and Wildlife Commission in Florida, where the
reptile is common.
Northcutt said because the alligator will only eat food
that moves, they are fed stunned mice, with some frozen
smelt on the side. He explained that if there is no movement
in their food, it is not uncommon for alligators to starve to
death, despite the fact they were surrounded by food.
Northcutt said alligators do not attack humans without
provocation. Rather, alligators are very docile reptiles and
would probably swim away if some unfortunate person was
dumped overboard in their company.
The only cases of documented alligator attacks, said
Northcutt, are those when a small child or pet was flailing
in the water and were mistaken for more common food by
alligators.

wel e on
22.
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tsee

Law students organize to back

a

ABA affirmative actioi

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where the lifestyle is as rewarding as
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Talk to us about your career and about
our excellent pay and complete
program of benefits, including tuition
refund. Make an appointment now by
contacting your campus Placement
Office. Or, if you're unable to see us on
campus, send your resume and
transcript to: College Relations
Coordinator.
r~ FLIGHT SYSTEMS
P. O. Box 21111
Phoenix, Arizona 85036
We're ane Equal Opportunity Employer.
U..S. citizenship or permanent resident status required.

By JAY McCORMICK
Minority law students, dismayed by
Law School Dean Terrence Sandalow's
opposition to a proposed American Bar1
Association (ABA) affirmative action
and school accreditation guideline,
caucused yesterday and decided to'
pressure the dean and all others in-
volved with the proposal.
The amendment to the ABA
accreditation guidelines would require
law schools to "expand opportunities"
for minorities interested in law.
Sandalow, contacted last night at his
home, said he is opposed to the
proposed guideline because he feels it
would compromise the autonomy of law
schools. He said he is in favor of
affirmative action programs for law
schools, but added he does not believe
the ABA should make such programs a
condition for accreditation.
THE PARTICPANTS in the minority
law student meeting decided to form a
committee to research the proposal and
discuss the matter with the dean.
Groups involved in the meeting
included the Black Law Student
Alliance, the Women Law Student
Association, the National Lawyer's
Guild, and La Raza-the Latino law
students' organization.
Suggestions discussed at the student
meeting for improving the chance of
passing the proposal at the August
meeting of the ABA included putting
pressure on the dean and other
members of the ABA to reverse or at
-- least stop advocating their positions on
the issue.'

One student at the caucus said, "We
must be pragmatic, we must put
pressure on people most susceptible to
pressure." Another student said that
the students could put pressure on
Sandalow through groups in Lansing,
and possibly the UAW in Detroit.
THE STUDENTS also questioned
whether Sandalow represents the
faculty of the law school, or was voicing
his own opinions. One participant
suggested raising support in the law
school faculty for the proposla.,
Sandalow said his opposition to the
proposal was unrelated to his or the
Law School's attitude towards
affirmative action. "The proposal
would have no effect on the University
Law School," he said, because the
school had had progressive programs
for minorities for several years.
The New York Times quoted
Sandalow last Wednesday as saying the
ABA should base its accreditation
decisions only on the quality of
education of the school in question. He
said the proposal would be an "invasion
of the autonomy of the law schools."

n proposal,
AFTER RETURNING from the
Chicago meeting of the ABA House of
Delegates, Sandalow said he was
concerned with the "proper scope of the
Association." He said he does not feel
the ABA should have the power to
require all law schools to institute
affirmative action programs, altough
he is in favor of such programs.
Allan Stillwagon, Assistant Dean and
Director of Admissions of the Law
School , said Sandalow "is a
distinguished leader of affirmative
action in the law." He also said the
University Law School has a high
percentage of minority students, "more
than many other high caliber law
schools."
One of the students at the causus said
the group could "statistically and
concretely show that he is not in favor
of affirmative action, despite what he
says."
Sandalow, when asked about the
school's affirmative action record, said
"the statistics are there. This is not
something someone can just voice an
opinion on.

Econ. Department seeks
aid to ease overcrowding

I U

CAM

D

(Continued from'Page 1)
said.
CAPPING CLASSES, or refusing
overrides into courses, has been
suggested as one undesirable alter-
native to alleviating the problem.
Shepherd said capping courses is a
bad idea, but may become necessary
because of size. "Capping is a straight
violation of student choice," he said.

)

JNS

CO

,

STEVE'S LUNCH *
We Serve Breakfast All Day *
Try Our Famous 3 Egg Omelet
with your choice of fresh bean sprouts, mushrooms,
green peppers, onion, ham, bacon, and cheese.
See Us Also For Our Lunch & Dinner Menus *
1313 S. University Open Tues.-Sun. 8-7

'v
Ii

MON
MIl

MEET KEY STAFF bF THE MAJOR
MIDWESTERN JEWISH CAMPS, GET
INFORMATION AND BROCHURES,
INTERVIEW FOR STAFF POSITIONS,

"Students 'have a legitimate com-
plaint."
Class size, Anderson said, caused her
to hold two review sessions containing
the same information. "No matter what
you do, you feel it's not enough," sheO
said.
FRYE SUGGESTED several alter-
natives the department could institute
to help alleviate the crowded con-
ditions. He said the faculty may have to
accept large lectures, change certain
class formats, or try machine-assisted
training.
Current classes are bursting at the
seams, according to several economics
professors, and affecting the quality of
education.
"Sections are too large by five to 10
students tobe effective," Prof. Dan
Fusfeld said about his introductory
economics class. "There has to be some
losses in teaching effectiveness (with
the large size)."
Frye said the college has a limited
capacity to provide incremental
changes. "The college is concerned and
responsive," he said. ''We're not indif-
ferent. Anyone that thinks that is ut-
terly mistaken."
OIL POLLUTION
LONDON (AP)-With assistance
from the U.N. Inter-Governmental
Maritime Organization, China is em-
barking on a program to protect its seas
from oil pollution.
Pollution around the coasts of China
has been a matter of concern to the.
government for some time and
although various attempts have been
made to ensure that adequate
precautions are taken while tankers are
discharging oil, they have not been
completely successful. The government
has decided to take further steps before
the problem becomes more serious.
Early in 1980, two teams of Chinese
engineers will visit environment cen-
ters in Japan, North America and
Europe to survey methods of preven-
ting and dealing with oil pollution.
I m-

DAY, FEBRUA R Y 11

CHIGAN

LEAGUE

(MICHIGAN ROOM)

3-5 PM,

7-10 PM

N
4;

STARTS TONIGHT! (Upper Level)
MON, TUE, THURS, FRI7:05-9:30
SAT-SUN-WED 1:00-3:00-5:00-7:00-9:15
CAPTAIN AVENGER MAKES DUST BUST!
RHEPISROTEWAYCi
i"

Participating Camps:
Chi (WISCONSIN)
Herzl (WISCONSIN)
Interlaken (WISCONSIN)
Ramah (ONTARIO)
Tamarack (MICHIGAN)

may be mid-winter but at the
Trueblood Theatre it's the.

1

Tavor (MICHIGAN)
U.A.H.C. (Oco

II

)NOMOWOC, WIS.)

mor7 I a*yIq

I I

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