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February 06, 1980 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-02-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

e 12-'Wednesday, February 6, 1980-The Michigan Daily

Reporter: Reactor

security lax

From AP and UPI
HARRISBURG, Pa.-A reporter who
got himself hired as a guard at the
Three Mile Island nuclear plant later
gained entry through an unlocked door
to the sensitive control room, his
newspaper reported yesterday.
The Guide, a muckraking Harrisburg
area weekly, printed copyright stories

about the exploits of cub reporter
Robert Kapler following a court battle
in which Metropolitan Edison Co. tried
to block publication.
A JUDGE RULED against the power
company.
In two articles, headlined, "Paradise
Isalnd for the Saboteur," and "I Waltz
into Unlocked Control Room of Unit 2,"
Kapler alleged that security was lax at
Three Mile Island and company and
government protection regulations
don't work.
Kapler- said he was hired as an
unarmed watchman, a low level guard
who is not supposed to have access to
the eontrol room. Armed guards, who

have a higher security clearnace, do
have such access.
UNIT 2 IS the facility severely
damaged last March in the worst
accident in the history of U.S.
commercial nuclear power. Its control
room is where vital reactor functions
are still maintained.
The Guide published photographs by
Kapler identified as the interior of the
control room and an unlocked
control room door, with the knob
missing so that a piece of rope was used
to pull it open.
The photos were taken, the Guide
said, with a concealed Minox spy

camera-"the kind the CIA uses."
The newspaper also detailed what it
claimed was laxity in the plant security
operation, which allowed Kapler to get
a job as a security guard with bogus
identification and apparently without
having his background checked.
THE 26-YEAR-OLD reporter
contended it was relatively easy for
him, or anybody else, to obtain a job at
Three Mile Island as a guard.
Once inside the plant, he learned
personnel were not carefully monitored
nor searched for weapons, an employee
could violate security rules by taking
home his plant entry badge, and public

address systems didn't function
properly in times of safety drills.
"Since I was a guard, I was neveO
frisked. I had an opportunity to roam
by myself throughout the complex,"
Kapler said.
"If I had indeed been a saboteur, I
could have taken explosives, weapons
and ammunition onto Three Mile
Island, into vital areas, into the control
room," he said.
Sandy Polon, a spokesman for
Metropolitan Edison Co., declined
comment on the newspaper articles aO
did the contractor that supplies the
company with guards, Gregg Security
Co.

Camp Counselor
Recruiting Expo
Recruiters from the major
midwestern Jewish camps
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 11,
3-5pm and 7-1 pm
Michigan room of the Michigan League

STATE DEPT. RELEASES HUMAN RIGHTS REPOR T:

World oppression

up-U.S.

I

01

WASHINGTON (AP) - Human
rights were repressed all around the
world in 1979 as dictatorships, of the left
and right, practiced torture and
cracked down on dissent, according to a
State Department report. But here and

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School getting you
down?
TaeAbreak!

there, freedom took a step forward.
In two Warsaw Bloc countries,
Poland and Hungary, internal controls
were eased. In Argentina, the incidence
of people seized without explanation
dropped sharply and may be near an
end. In Egypt, liberalization moved
ahead under President Anwar Sadat,
THESE ARE among the findings in
the State Department's annual human
rights report, submitted yesterday to
Congress. For the first time, all 154
countries were surveyed.
The 854-page document is a catalogue
of extensive violations. Only a few, such
as the seizure of an estimated 50
American diplomats in Iran, are well-
known. For the most part, the victims
are faceless to the world at large.
The abuses are set down in dry,
bureaucratic language.
IN CZECHOSLOVAKIA, "overt op-
position in any field is punished."
In Ethiopia, "'it still appears likely
that the government tortures political
and military prisoners to extract in-
formation or confessions."

In Iran, "several thousand persons
ren in in custody for political
reasons."
In Libya, "detainees in criminal and
security cases reportedly are frequen-
tly beaten during interrogation."
In South Africa, "the governing
reality of life . . . is apartheid."
IN VIETNAM, "deprivation of
adequate medical and nutritional care
for political prisoners and prisoners of
cohscience over extended periods has
resulted in acute suffering, per anent
physical impairment and death in
numerous reported incidents."
The report is sharply critical of the
Soviet Union, estimating the number of
political prisoners at 2,000 to 10,000. The
government, it says, "recognizes no
right to any opinion or behavior it
chooses to regard as deviant."
The world's other major communist
country, China, gets a mixed review.
Since Chairman Mao Tse-tung's death
in 1976, "movement in the direction of
greater freedoms" is reported. There is
some tolerance of dissent and a livelier

press.
"But the reforms have not yet broken
the entrenched patterns of harassment
arbitrary arrest and harsh punishment
for political dissent," the report said.
COUNTRIES ARE not compared one
to another or to their own past records.
But in the case of Cambodia, the
report writers were moved to make the
flat statement that "nowhere in the
world are human- rights mor*
beleagured."
Life in North Korea, another com-
munist regime, is described as
"perhaps the most highly regimented
and controlled in the world today."
Iran appears to be a case of one
repressive regime succeeding another.
BUT UNDER Ayatollah Ruhollah
Khomeini ~s rule, more -than 700
executions were carried out, thousand
of Iranians fled their countries an
vigilante groups wereaallowed to take
actions against the Bahais and other
minority groups, the report says.

Residence halls tabulate
savings as contests end

SUBSCRIBE TODAY. . . 764-0558

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(Continued from Page 3)
of $800 over last year at that same time,
and Mosher Jordan saved $900 among
electrical, steam (heating) and water
costs.
THE INDIVIDUAL halls can set the
contest up any way they desire. MoJo
merely compared , this year's result
with last year's, but in Markley the
various houses within the dorm com-
peted against each other for individual
awards which came out of the seed
money from housing.
Response from students varied, some
expressing enthusiasm and others

MARTY'S... GOES DUTCH TREAT WITH THEIR FIFTH ANNUAL .,..

apathy. Steve Fleischnann, a resident
of Frost house, the winning house in
Markley, said that he contributed to
conservation by shutting off ?lights and
closing his drapes more often, which he
said he is continuing to do now. His
house won $200 for their treasury.
Valerie Vener from MoJo said the
contest was a good idea. "We cut down
on heat by turning it up as high as it
would go for about five minutes an*
then shutting.it off for the rest of the
night," she said. She added that in a
loft, one doesn't really miss the heat at
night.
ANOTHER MOJO resident, Ann
Steele, claimed the contest had little ef-
feet on her habits. "I always do it
anyway," she said.
Many residents of the two dorms had
previously complained of the heat
problem, saying it was an obviou
waste. SanFacon explained that the hot'
water heater must be kept at a level
high enough to keep the coldest areas of
the building up to temperature. Often
one area or wing gets much more sun or
heat than another and consequently is
overheated. Several dorms are already
installed with special devices than can
compensate for the colder areas by
"zoning" the building and supplying
different amounts of heat to each zone,
depending on what is needed. San Facon
said he would like to see such a devic'
installed in Markley. The University is
considering this for the future.

DUTCH

UCTIO

FINAL WINTER
CLEARANCE
NOW THRU SATURDAY

-- - - - - SUITS-

I

-SPORTS COATS
Wednesday's Thursday's Friday's
Dutch Treat Dutch Treat Dutch Treat

Regular
price
$115
$155
$195
$225
$265
$295

Wednesday's
Dutch Treat
$ 95
$135
$175
$205
$240
$265

Thursday's
Dutch Treat
$ 75
$115
$155
$185
$215
$235

Friday's
Dutch Treat
$ 55
$ 95
$135
$165
$190
$205

Saturday's
Dutch Treat
$ 35
$ 75
$115
$145
$165
$175

Regular
price
$ 65
$ 85
$ 95
$115
$135
$155

$ 55
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$120
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$ 45
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$ 90
$105
$125

$ 35
$ 55
$ 65
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$ 90
$110

Saturday's
Dutch Treat
$ 25
$ 45
$ 55
$ 70
$ 75
$95

T

l

row

___________________________________________________________________________________________£

His Lady Shop For Women

PENDLETON SPECIAL

Marty's Men's Store
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Clive Brnts,N.Y. Post

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