100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 05, 1980 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-02-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, February 5, 1980-Pae 5
- - I '

Oscar succeeds in the tradition

By ERIC L. SMITH
Saturday night's concert at Hill
Auditorium reaffirmed what most Ann
Arbor Jazz , fans already believed.
Oscar Peterson ranks alongside of Art
Tatum, Bud Powell and Earl Hines, as
one of the primary jazz pianists. His
greatness is solidified by his mastery of
many techniques and styles.
Both in treatment of old standards
and contemporary tunes, the concert's
highlights repeatedly proved Peter-
son's skill. One might expect the lack of
a bassist or percussive support to prove
a problem. Not so for Peterson. He has
never been a band pianist and although
he works in a trio and duet format of-
ten, he is quite comfortable in the solo
setting. He alternates the melody and
bass line from left to right, then back
again. "Making Whoopie" was a good
example of this. The aggressive tone of
bluesy swing, the unexpected chord
changes and horn-like lines made this
one a crowd-pi Baser.
PETERSON'S DELIVERY of
"Green Dolphin Street" was hardly
predictable. Here Art Tatum's device
of adding chords to the original struc-
ture and eventual conquest of all inter-
vals and octaves was clear. This preoc-
cupation with form and variation of
styles also appeared in the medley of
Charlie Parker songs: "Ko! Ko",
"Dream of You", "Lover Man" among
others were executed with stunning
speed and emotion.
"Just The Way You Are", in Peter-
son's hands, a vehicle for numerous
stylistic possibilities. It started as a
slow, funky blues, picked up into a

stride style, and eventually added bits
of bop, ragtime, swing, before retur-
ning to a soulful climax. "Just The Way
You Are" showed that Peterson is
aware of the contemporary pop scene
though many people consider him an
archaic traditionalist.
THE SELECTIONS from the album
Nightchild and "Days of Wine and
Roses" (the encore) showed a tender
side of Peterson beneath the torrent of
frantic keyboard runs. Peterson likes to
interject various embellishments and
melodic variations. When this is done
with a relaxed feeling, as on the Night-
child songs, the sonata-like effect is
hypnotic. The standard "Days of Wine
and Roses", which Peterson recorded
with Harry Edison, finally received a
fresh interpretation. He dropped the
frantic uptempo pace of the recorded
version and reverted to a more
traditional lyrical exploration of the
theme, featuring contrast of high and
low registers.
Peterson has been a major influence
on the jazz mainstream for more than
thirty years. He has performed with
such veterans as Ella Fitzgerald, Joe
Pass, Dizzy Gillespie and Royi
Eldridge. A composer as well as a
pianist, Peterson is regarded as the
master of traditional jazz piano. As
anyone at Hill auditorium Saturday
night can attest, his accumulated
knowledge and ability can't be
questioned.
IIEE

PUT'EI
lUST FO

A AWAY
If you can live without
your cigarettes for one
day. you might find you
can live without them
forever.

R ADAY.

A2 CIVIC THEATRE TRYOUTS
FOR
"THE CRUCIBLE"
Feb.3, 4, and 5 at 7:30 P.M.
Some callbacks on Wed. Feb. 6
THERE ARE ROLES FOR: 11 men and 10 women (5 women between
14-21). In addition to reading from the script and spontaneous improvisions
each person may audition with 1 or 2 prepared poems, speeches from other
plays, or naturalistic pantomimes-2-3 minutes-optional.
AACT Main St. Building
338 S. Main St.
The Ann Arbor Film Coopers ie Presents at MLB: $1.50
Tuesday, February 5 TRUFFAUT FEST
THE SOFT SKIN (Francois Truffaut, 1964) 7:00-MLB3
Truffaut's least seen and most underrated film this is the story of a menaoe-a-
trois with a weak man at the triangle's apex and two stronger women at the
base. What makes this film stand out from hundreds of others on adultry is
Truffaut's extraordinary capacity to combine several restrained, impartial
observations of his characters with a real synpathy and sensitivity to their
problems. French with subtitles.
JUL ES AND JIM (Francois Truffaut, 1961) 8:00-MLB3
This is the film that propelled Truffaut to the. head of the French New-Wave.:,
Although it evokes the romantic nostolaia before the First World Wdr, Jules
and Jim exquisitely illuminates a modern woman, Catherine (JEANNE
MOREAU), amoral and classically beautiful, loves two fraternal friends and
must have them both. For her, no commitment is forever and only death is
final. "Will rank among the greatest lyrical achievements of the screen."
-Pauline Kael. OSCAR WERNER, ,HENRI SERRE, MARIE DUBOIS. French with
subtitles. Plus short: LE MISTONS.
Tomorrow: Makevejev's INNOCENCE UNPROTECTED and Thursday: THE KIDS ARE
MAN IS NOT A BIRD at Aud. A. FREE. ALRIGHT in Aud. A $1.50
THE DEER HUNTER has been postponed. GET OUR YOUR HANDKERKCHIEFS
will show both Feb. 12 and Feb. 13 at Aud. A.

Jazz pianist Oscar Peterson is seen after his Saturday night concert at Hill
Auditorium. Peterson's combination of traditional and contemporary
material won the approval of the Hill audience.

FeldBallet glows Saturday

By ELLEN REISER
Despite ann illness in the company
which necessitated changes in their
Friday program, the Feld Ballet was
back in form at Power Center for its
Saturday evening performance. Har-
binger, Feld's first choreographic ef-
fort, was at the top of the program.
Even though the ballet is now well over
ten years old, it has not lost the charm
and wit which brought it acclaim when
it was premiered in 1967. Drawing upon
*oth modern dance and classical ballet,
the plotless ballet is a showpiece for
dancers with strong legs and the ability
to make the most awkwardly placed lif-
ts look like fun. In short it is a perfect
ballet for the Feld company.
WEARING COSTUMES in crayon
colors, the - company pranced,
leapt, and twirled through
the , five movements of the
Prokofiev ballet, Concerto No. 5 for
*Piano and Orchestra. Richard Fein, a
last-minute substitution, danced the first
movement well. The second movement,
aggressively danced by Christine Sarry
and- Gregory Mitchell, featured Miss
harry throwing herself into, onto, and
over Mr. Mitchell. A change of pace
was provided by the third movement
which was notable for a languid but
"elegant pas de deux by Linda Miller and
Patrick Cea. -In slow motion, Miss

Miller swung around Mr. Cea and
framed his body with her long legs. The
final movement, which contained some
startling backward.leaps of the women
into the arms of their partners, was
done in a playful mood with the dancers
jumping up in a variety of poses to form
a melange of shapes and colors.
A SOLDIER'S TALE, set to
Stravinsky's L'Histoire du Soldat, was
the second ballet of the program. A
mock-sleazy paean to soldiers' leaves
since time immortal, the ballet traced
the nocturnal adventures of the soldier,
danced by Jeff Satinoff, and his com-
patriots. Eliot Feld himself danced the
role of the oily bowler-hatted pimp.
Fingers undulating, outlined in a dim
violet glow, he appeared and reap-
peared out of the blackness at the back
of the stage. The two whores, danced by
Gloria Brisbin abd Nancy Thuesen,
prepared for business with ragdoll
abandon. -.As might be expected, the

whole lot eventually met up together.
The soldier and his friends launched
themselves like spawning salmon at the
feet of the whores. The pimp let loose
his ladies who promptly set about in-
teresting the soldier in a number of
ways which probably shouldn't be men-
tioned in this space. Finally, the soldier
was rolled and the ladies and their pimp
triumphantly swayed away.
THE LAST ballet on the program,
Half Time, was a crazy celebration of a
footall show. According to a member of
the company, when the Feld Ballet took
this ballet to Francem, the French,
never ones for obscure American
rituals, booed the piece. However, if
you are American, Half. Time, set to
Morton Gould's rousing Formations, is
a wicked parody of every football game
half time show ever seen. With a white
star shining it) the middle of the stage,
the dancers, who wore sweat socks
and red, white, and blue cheerleading.
uniforms, proceeded to camp their way
from a march all the way throughto the
traditional salute to the flag. In bet-
ween, the audience was treated to a
male cheerleading drill team, a spritely
trio of saluting dancers, a sorority
"waltz," and a baton-twirling Old
Glory, Nancy Thuesen, performed an
enthusiastic solo with two pom-poms
which wandered about her body in a
style which had little to do with ballet.

Join arts,
If you're interested in covering
the arts-movies, plays, museum
shows, concerts, records,
etc.-for the Michigan Daily arts
page, get off your duff and bring
a writing sample representative
of your arts interests to Mark
Coleman or Dennis Harvey, the
arts editors, upstairs any week-
day afternoon at the Student
Publications building, 420
Maynard. Or call us at the Daily,
764-0552.

Your only opportunity to see
INTERNATIONAL HOCKEY COMPETITION

n

at Michigan this year

n

Stn Avenue atL iberty St. 761-9700
Formerly Fifth Forum Theater

11

A KNOCK-OUT
COMEDY IN THE
TRADITION OF
THE 3 STOOGES!

WELCOME.
No. 3 NCAA POLISH
MICHIGAN OLYMPIC
"WOLVERINES" 4
". TEA M
Q~ A LL .y
w SEATS
$300
YoS
rickets now available Michigan ticket office and at Yost 6:00 PM Wed._

KHOMEINI PR OMISES SUPPOR T:
Iran president sworn in

Mon, Tues, Thurs-6:20, 8:10, 10:00 7P
Mon, Tues, Thurs $1.50 til 6:45
Wed-2:30, 4:20, 6:20, 8:10, 10:00
Wed $1.50 til 3:00, $2.50 til 4:30

From APand UPI
Abolhassan Bani Sadr became Iran's
-first president last night at the Tehran
hospital where ailing Ayatollah
*Ruhollah Khomeini swore him in and
endorsed him before a television
audience.
At the hospital ceremony Bani Sadr
pledged to Khomeini and the broadcast
'audience that he would work to rid the
-country of hundreds of years of corrup-
tion brought on by successive monar-
chical governments.
In return, Khomeini promised to en-
dorse and support Bani Sadr's electoral
*victory as long as the new president
followed the sacred principles of Islam,
abided by the constitution, and helped
the poor and the oppressed.
KHOMEINI'S public display of sup-
port for Bani Sadr should provide the
46-year-old president with enormous
political strength at least in the initial
stages of his four-year term.
During his brief tenure as Iran's
foreign minister last fall, Bani Sadr
displayed a more moderate approach to
0 =2-M -)

the American hostage crisis than his breakthrough in the Tehran hostage
successor, Sadegh Ghotbzadeh, has. situation, despite the fact the new
Militants occupying the I .S. Em- Iranian president Bani-Sadr did not in-
bassy in Tehran have rejected all effor- lude the return of the shah in his list of
ts to win release of the 50 Americans, requirements for the release of the
who began their fourth month in cap- hostages, when he appeared in a broad-
tivity yesterday, insisting the deposed cast interview Sunday.
shah first be returned to stand trial for Carter said, "The problem continues
corruption. The government endorsed to be one of finding an authority in Iran
their demands, but has agreed to to deal with the question."
establishment of an international Election of a parliament, expected in
commission to investigate alleged about a month, will complete the tran-
crimes of toppled Shah Mohammad sfer of power from the shah.
Reza Pahlavi. The shah is in Panama. KHOMEINI HOLDS supreme power
T HE STATE Department said under the new Islamic constitution and
yesterday it sees no hope of an early can dismiss Bani-Sadr if he wishes.
pm5 =====CLIP ummminmmmininU
ATTENTION,e
ENGINEERING STUDENTS!
Cast aside your calculators and computers for a
well-deserved break! Jog over to the Ice Cream ;
Bar at the Little League with this ad and your ID card ,
and treat yourself toa
SLIDE RULE SUNDAE*
at half price -504
OFFER GOOD TUESDAY, FEB 5 ,
r1Jne-%11. ,., rDn F

I

r

GRADUAT ING
EN GINEERS
Have you considered these factors in determining where
you will work?

j
+ C
S

a

1. Will the job offer challenge and
responsibility?
2. Will your future employer en-
courage job mobility?
3. Will your future employer en-
courage. support and reward
continued professional educa-
tion?
4. How much choice will you have
in selecting your work assign-
ment?
5. Big starting salaries are nice -
but what is the salary growth
and promotion potential in the
job?

6. Can you afford the cost-of-
living in the area?
At the Naval Weapons Center we
have given these things a lot of
consideration and believe we
have the answers for you.
Arrange through your placement
office to interview with our repre-
sentative Mike Jacobson
on February 21
We think you will like
what you hear.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan