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February 03, 1980 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-02-03

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The Michigan Daily-Sunday, February 3, 1980-Page 7

Senator,
7 Reps.
implicated
IMP F
in probe
(Continued from Page i)
man, whom they depicted as being a 40-
year-old Lebanese businessman in-
volved in shipping oil to the United
States and interested in broadening his
dealings.
SOURCES SAID aides to Rahman
told public officials he wanted a casino
gambling license in Atlantic City, N.J.,
and help in getting congressional help
to remain in the United States. He also
wanted legislation introduced to allow
his friends, whose visas had expired, to
remain in the country.
The New York Times reported the
FBI first created an Arab Sheik after
an informer tipped the bureau to the
whereabouts of two valuabletpaintings,
missing for 13 years after they w'ere
taken from the loading platform of the
United Nations Plaza Apartments.
During negotiations leading to
recovery of the paintings, the Times
said, an undercover FBI agent posed as
a sheik who wanted to buy them.
IT SAID THE bureau then moved into
a probe of political corruption, and
began creating more Arab business
agents.
The Times said FBI agents first ran
into Sen. Williams while investigating
two New Jersey officials.
The Times said the agents met
Williams in Florida last March and
discussed giving the senator a share of
a titanium mine if he would use his in-
fluence to obtain government contracts
for the venture.
Mike McCurry, a spokesman for Sen.
Williams, said, "The first Senator
Williams heard of these allegations was
this afternoon (yesterday) when he was
contacted by a reporter.

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AP Photo
NEW MEXICO NATIONAL Guardsmen wait near the employees residential area at the New Mexico State Peniten-
tiary. Inmates took over the prison early yesterday morning.
Inmates control prison
(Continued from Page 1)

I

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ds and two injured inmates who were
released.
ALSO INJURED were two inmates
and four other guards still inside.
The governor said any decision to
storm the prison would be left up to law
enforcement officials, but added that if
the decision were made, police and
National Guard troops "are ready
to go."
The inmates had threatened to kill
their hostages unless allowed to talk
to the governor and a reporter, or'if
police tried to storm the prison.
Authorities at first thought 13
hostages were being held.
A negotiator for the inmates, who
identified himself as "Chopper
One," told authorities by two-way

radio that the remaining hostages
would be "snuffed out" if police.
tried to penetrate the fence, said
State Police Capt. Bob Carroll.
Leadaers of the uprising said the
hostages were being well treated,
but threatened to kill them if
authorities made "one funny move."
. "THESE MEN are not demanding.
anything that is outrageious, altough
they are going about it in the wrong
way," said State Corrections Com-
mission Secretary Bud Richards.
"The federal courts have been on
our back on this (overcrowding) and
we've had suit after suit on it. It
finally just exploded."
The New Mexico State Peniten-

tiary was considered a model
facility capable of housing 1,000 in-
mates when it was completed in
1954." At that time, New Mexico's
population was about 826,500.
About eight years ago, with the
prison population on the decline due
to more liberal sentencing, two of
the dormitories were converted into
classrooms, reducing capacity toa
about 800 inmates.
Then came the explosion. AS New
Mexico's population swelled to
almost 1.2 million, the prison
became more and more crowded. At
the time of yesterday's takeover by
the inmates, almost 1,200, were
jammed into the facility.

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ZIA SA YS HE IS PLEASED WITH THE PROGRESS:
U.S., Pakistan continue military aid talks

.

(Continued from Page 1)
about their frontier with India, with
whom they fought wars in 1965 and.1971.
Although reckoned to be a well-
disciplined fighting force, Pakistan's
450,000-man army lacks much of the
modern weaponry it would need to
counter Soviet or Soviet-backed
punitive raids from Afghanistan.
Pakistan shares a 1,200-mile border
with Afghanistan, and Zia has ex-
pressed concern that his nation is
vulnerable to an attack by the ap-
proximately 100,000 troops Western ex-
perts estimate the Soviets now have in
* Afghanistan. The Soviets, who backed a
government there, have been suppor-
ting the government's troops fighting
Afghan Islamic rebels.
THE CARTER administration has
indicated it plans to submit the
Pakistan aid package toCongress this
coming week, putting the Brezezinski
mission under pressure to wrap up
some sort of understanding with
Pakistan.
Brzezinski is to fly to Riyadh, Saudi
Arabia, tomorrow for talks on the
security of the region.. He is likely to
Khomeini to
confer with
new Iranian
president
(Continued from Page 1)
Pahlavi. An Egyptian journalist in
London said the 50 American hostages
held captive since Nov. 4 would be tur-
ned over to a "third party" when the
commission members arrive in Iran.
mIT WAS NOT known if the embassy
_i militants and Revolutionary Council
were talking about a U.S. delegation
being part of an investigative com-
mission.
Revolutionary Council spokesman
Hassan Habibi was quoted by Iran's of-
ficial Pars news agency as saying the
"international investigation com-
mission will consider the shah's crimes,
his violation of human rights and the
return of his wealth to Iran." He did not
say when the tribunal would meet or
give other details, according to Pars.
it IN an article in London's Sunday
Times, Egyptian journalist Muham-
med Heikal said the U.S. hostages
would be released upon the arrival in
Tehran of the international com-
mission. He wrote that under a com-
promise, the hostages would be "kept in
Tehran in the custody of a third party.
The United States would have access to
them and be responsible for their health
and welfare.

CLOSED OUT
OF A COURSE

discuss Carter's proposal for a U.S. -
Western Europe-Middle East consor-
tium to assist Pakistan and other area
nations to shore up their defenses in the
face of the current Soviet presence in
Afghanistan.
The arms negotiations in Pakistan
have triggered concerns in India, which
has fought three wars in the last 33
years with its neighbor on the subcon-
tinent.
IN NEW DELHI, Indian Foreign
Secretary R.D. Sathe yesterday
prepared to visit Pakistan to discuss

relations between the two traditional
enemies. Any easing of Indian-
Pakistani tension would boost U.S. ef-
forts to create a buffer on the Indian
subcontinent against potential Soviet
expansion.
India and Pakistan's wariness of
each other has complicated a Carter
administration effort to conclude an
arms deal with Pakistan. /
In Moscow, meanwhile, the Com-
munist Party newspaper Pravda said
the Soviet Union has no designs on Mid-

dIe East oil and no intention of pushing
through Pakistan or Iran to ports on the
Indian Ocean.
"The Soviet Union has no hostile in-
tentions toward any state in the Near
and Middle East," Pravda said. "The
Soviet Union has never had and does
not have now any intention to push its
way to the warm seas. Limitation of
military activity in the Indian Ocean
... and termination of military rivalry
in the zone would meet our interests
and our security."

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Traveller relates experiences

10

from 3-m
(Continued from Page 1)
Americans lived in skyscrapers and
earned $20,00-$30,000 a year."
Leaner, having been to China two
previous times-in 1973 and 1977-saw
many changes. "Bright colored
clothing is worn by almost everyone;
much less emphasis is placed on what
people wear," she said.
Leaner attributed this to the influen-
ce of western tastes, the increase in the
standard of living, and the fact that the
Gang of Four's insistence that people
wear drab clothing to spur
revolutionary feeling disappeared
along with that government.
IN THE CITIES people seem to at-
tend movies and plays more, although
television is still quite a novelty, Leaner
said. In the country, recreational ac-
tivities consist of movies once a month
and some games that children play. "I
saw some boys playing cards," Leaner
said, "but I noticed that the girls were
encouraged to stay close to the house."
The role of women in China was
another area that fascinated Leaner.

onth trip to
She was glad to see that "women were
still holding up their half of the sky." In
some brigades, she noticed that women
were given the same number of work
pants as men were for comparable
work, while in others there was a slight
discrepancy. r ,
In the city, there is a deep concern
about the rise of a privileged, elite
group. The effects of bureaucracy and
of the many unemployed people are
also on the minds of the city people,
Leaner said.
THERE IS a general social ex-
periment in progress, according to
Leaner. "These people want to increase
technorogy," said Leaner; "but they
also want to keep their socialist way of
government."
Overpopulation has become another
major, concern of the people. Their
solutions include penalties for any
familywith more than two children and
a monetary reward for those couples
that agree to have only one child,
Leaner explained.
Leaner said she was most impressed

1China
with the hard work the peasants did on
the brigade. "During harvest season,
everyone works from 6 a.m. to past 10
p.m.," she said. She commented that
the hard labor made many 20-year-olds
look as if they were 50.
Within the brigade itself. Leaner-
found a unique closeness. "Because
everyone lives together so closely,
there are many people to go to .when
you have problems."
At the end of the trip, she said the
response of the Chinese was very
touching.

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