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February 02, 1980 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1980-02-02

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Page 2-Saturday, February 2, 1980-'The Michigan Doily

Washington greets six
after escape from Iran

From AP and UPI
WASHINGTON-Six American diplomats who escaped
from Iran using false passposrts provided by Canadian
diplomats were reunited yesterday with their cheering co-
workers at the State Department.
President Carter met with them for about 10 minutes in
the Oval Office and then said "we're grateful to have-them
back. We're really pleased that they're all safe."
"THIS OCCASION demonstrates the United States still
has friends in this world," Sen. Frank Church (D-Idaho) said
during-the State Department ceremonies that followed.
The six returning Americans, all wearing a Canadian
maple leaf or flag pin in their lapels, stood smiling on a small
raised platform.
Fifty-three other Americans remain in Iran-50 who have
been held hostage for 90 days by militants who seized the U.S.
Embassy, and three others in custody at the Foreign
Ministry.
HUNDREDS OF State Department workers jammed the
diplomatic lobby to welcome the six: Mark Lijek, a consular
officer; his wife, Cora Amburn Lijek, a+,eonsular assistant;
Robert Anders, a consular officer; Henry Lee Schatz, an
agricultural attache; Joseph Stafford, a consular officer, and
his wife, Kathleen Stafford, a consular assistant.
It was the first public appearance the group has made sin-
ce flying into Dover Air Force Base Wednesday and Anders,
the senior official among the six, read a statement for all of
them.
No questions were taken because State Department of-
ficials felt that might endanger the 50 Americans still held
hostage at the U.S. Embassy in Tehran.
anders said later: "It is difficult to fully express our ap-
preciation for. the risks the Canadians took to ensure our
safety and comfort. They made us. feel a part of their
families."
"It is thefeeling of. . . them and us that there is virtually
nothing they can do under official auspices here which can
help the condition of the hostages who are left behind in

Iran," said Hodding Carter, State Department spokesman.
"Most of our days were spent following events in the
world," Anders said. "We avidly read newspapers and
listened to overseas radio broadcasts. Also during the course
'of the three months, we played Scrabble to the point where
some of us could identify the letter on the front by the shape
of the grain on the back of the tile."
HE ADDED THAT "we must not and will not forget" the
Americans still held captive in Iran.
"They said they knew the people of our country loved
them, but they didn't know how much," Carter said.
The greetings for the six followed their flight to the capital
from Dover Air Force Base, Del.
Before the flight to Washington, the six were visited at
Dover by Delaware Gov. Pierre du Pont IV, who described
the mood at their quarters as "a little bit like Christmas." Du
Pont said he found them in "very good condition, both men-
tally and physically."
"THEY'RE OBVIOUSLY very happy to be home. They've
been through the toughest kind of ordeal-not knowing
whether they were going to be ditcovered or whether they
would ever make it home again," du Pont said.
The Soviet Union, in a Persiaijlanguage broadcast to Iran
on Thursday night, criticized the escape as "far from cour-
teous" and in violation of "the most elementary international
laws and principles."
The broadcast said "ordinarily, criminals and those who
have broken the laws are the ones who flee with forged
documents."
Aluding to the claim of Iranian militants that the U.S. em-
bassy was a spy center, the Soviet commentary continued:
"It must be said that quite often, U.S. diplomats, through
their acts, break internationally recognized laws and prin-
ciples." ,

AP Photo
REVOLUTIONARY GUARDS line up at the gates of the Tehran hospital where Ayatollah Khomeini is recovering from
a heart ailment. he flowers in the guards' rifles were donated by some of. the thousands who prayed for Khomeini's
health on the first anniversary of his return from exile. "
SOVIETS INCREASE ACTIVITY NEAR KABUL:
Brzezinski arrives in Pakistan

Qr~~~~,ludenni 'rir

AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS
CENTER at FIRST BAPTIST
CHURCH , .
502 EHuron St. (between State &
Division))-663-9376
Dr. Jitsuo Morikawa, Minister
10:00 a.m.-Worship Service-Ser-
mon: "Christian United In A World of
Diversity." Observance of The Lord's
Supper.
11:15 a.m.-1) A college class for
both faculty and students, led by Dr.
Nadean, Bishop.
2) An undergraduate campus class
for, students only, a discussion with
three students as leaders.
Wednesdays at 7:30 p.m.-Campus
Discussion Group-Led by Margi Stu-
ber, M.D., in the Campus Center
Lounge.
.*. * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.-662-4466
Service of Worship:
Sunday 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.
4:00 p.m. College Student Fellowship
in the French Room.
Prayer Breakfast Wednesday at 7:00
am.
Bible Study Wednesday at 4:00 p.m.
Theology Discussion Group Thurs-
day at 7:00 p.m.
* * *
ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic) i
331 Thompson-663-0557
Weekly Masses:
Mon.-Wed.-5:10 p.m.
Thurs. and Fri.-12:10 p.m.
Saturday-7:00 p.m.
Sunday-7:45 a.m., 9 a.m., 10:30
a.m.,;noon, and 5 p.m.
North Campus Mass-9:30 a.m. at
Bursley Hall, West Cafeteria.
Rite of Reconciliation - 4 p.m. - -
5 p.m. on Friday only; any other time
by appointment.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
12:16 Washtenaw Ave.
Fellowship Supported by the
Christian Reformed Church
Clay Libolt
Service 10:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.-
Sermon title: "Looking For Commun-
ity," the worship leaders will be Clay-
ton Libolt and Glenda Prins.

FIRST UNITED METIIODIST
C IURCII
120 S. State St.
(Corner of State and Iluron)
Worship Schedule:
8:30 a.m.-Holy Communion in th-
Chapel.
9:30, and 11:00 a.m.--Morning Wor-
ship in the Sanctuary.
Church School for All Ages-9:30
a.m. and 11 a.m.
Choir Rehearsal Thursday-7:15
p.m.
Ministers:
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
Rev. Fred B. Maitland
Dr. Gerald R. Parker
Education Director: Rose McLean
Education Asst.: Anne Vesey
* * *
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
Serving the Can us for LC-MS
Rovert Kavasch, Pastor
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
663-5560
Double Sunday Services-9:15 a.m.
and 10:30 a.m.
Supday Bible Study at 9:15 a.m.
Midweek Worship-Wednesday at
10:00 p.m.
* ~* *
CHfURCII OP CHRIST
530 W. Stadium
(Across from Pioneer High)
Schedule of Services:
Sunday-Bible School 9:30 a.ri .
Worship-10:30 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday-Bible Study 7:30 p.m.
Bible classes for College Students.
For information call 971-7925
Wilburn C. Hill, Evangelist
Transportatjon-662-9928
>NTERBURY LOFT
Episcopal Campus Ministry
332 S. State St.
Rev. Andrew Foster, Chaplain
SUNDAY COMMUNITY EVENTS
AT ST. ANDREWS CHURCH
306 N. Division
9:00 a.m.-University Study Group.
10:00 a.m.-Worship Service with the
Parish.
12 noon-Luncheon and Student Fel-
lowship.

NEWPOR T FELILOWSH IP
(Free Methodist Church)
1951 Newport Road-z;66;5-6
Sunday School-9:45 a.m.
Worship- 1:00 a.m.
(Nursery and Children's Worship).
Evening Worship-6:00 p.m.
Robert Henning. Pastor. 663-9526
* * *
('IIUR('II OFSCIE\T'loIOG(
IHuron Vallev Mission
809 1lenr' St.
668-611:3
Sunday Service 2:30 p.m.
Rev. Marian K. Kuhns
* * *
LORI) OF LIGHT LUTERIIEAN
CHIURCII
(The Campus MinistrN of the AL('-ICA)
Gordon Ward, Pastor-
801 S. Forest at Hill St.
10:30 a.m.--Worship Service.
We(dnesdavs. 7:00 p.m.-Choir Prac-
tice.
Thursday, 7:30 p.m.-South Africa
Task Force Meeting, in the lounge at
Lord of Light.
Fri., Sat., Sun., Feb. 8, 9, 10-There
will be a weekend retreat entitled "In
God's Image: Towards Wholeness As
Men and Women."
* * *
WESLEY FOUNDATION
at the University of Michigan
(313) 668-6881
602 E. Huron at State
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104
Rev. W. Thomas Schomaker, Chaplain
Ann Laurance, Ann Wilkinson
This Week:
Sunday, 5:30 p.m.-Shared Meal.
Sunday, 6:15 p.m.-Worship Service.
Monday, 12:10 p.m.-Brown bag film
today will be "Another Family for
Peace" . . . Five American families
struggle with the issues of participation
in a war time military. A free film
and a gogd way to have your lunch.
Monday, 7:30 p.m.-A program by
Eliana Moya-Raggio: "Human Rights
in Chile," followed by an exhibit and
sale of Chilean tapestries.
* * *
ANN ARBOR FRIENDS MEETING
1420 Hill Street
10:00 a.m.-Worship Service.

From AP and UPI
Zbigniew Brzezinski, President Car-
ter's national security adviser, arrived
yesterday in Islamabad for talks on
Pakistan's security and declared he
had come "to affirm, clearly and for all
the world 'to hear, our friendship for
Pakistan."
Meanwhile, Soviet air and armored
forces began a new round of intense ac-
tivity around the Afghan capital of
Kabul and the United States said it had
reports of "growing unrest in major
Afghan cities" and of looting by
Russian troops.
HELICOPTER gunships flew
ceaseless patrols around the Kabul
area, with some heading across the
mountains to the west amid rumors of
renewed guerrilla activity, correspon-
dents reported from Kabul.
Dozens of Soviet transport planes
flew out of Kabul on apparent supply
runs to troops stationed in outlying
regions._
On the ground, Russian troops kept
up increased patrols which began Wed-
nesday and, over the past 24 hours,
have resumed guard over several
major intersections in the city. Tanks,
rocket launchers and armored person-
nel carriers moved in columns through
the streets of the capital in renewed
shows of force.
IN PAKISTAN, Brzezinski and Un-
dersecretary of State Warren
Christopher planned to meet with
President Mohammed Zia ul-Haq and
his foreign affairs adviser, Agha Shahi,
on Pakistan's situation in response to
the Soviet Union's military intervention
in neighboring Afghanistan.
President Carter has offered
Pakistan $200 million in military aid
and $200 million in economic aid as a
result of the intervention of 100,000
Soviet soldiers in the Soviet Union's
southern neighbor. The Soviets backed
the ouster of one pro-Moscow leader
and installed another and are aiding
Afghan forces battling rebel guerrillas
who oppose the Marxist regime in
Kabul,
Zia has called the $400 million U.S. of-
fer "peanuts," and Brzezinski repor-
tedly hoped to assure the Pakistani
leader Awierican aid would not be
limited to that two-year package.
THE CARTER administration repor-
Daily Official Bulletin
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 19so
SUMMER JOBS
CAREER PLANNING AND PLACEMENT
3200 SA
On-Campus Interviews:
Crystalaire Camp, Frankfort, Mi. Wednesday,
Feb. 6.Sign up immediately.
Camp Tamarack, Brighton & Ortonville, Mi.
Friday, Feb. 8. Sign up immediately.
Camp Tanuga, Kalkaska, Mi. Monday, Feb. i.
Sign-upsbegin Tues., Feb. 5.
The Oakland Press, Pontiac, Mi. Monday. Feb. t.
Advertising and marketing internships with lt'al news-
paper. Must have completed junior year with course
work or experience in advertising or marketing.
Must fill out Campus Interview Form in advance.
Sign-ups begin Tuesday, February 5.
To sign up to'see any of these recruiters, come to'
3529 SAB or call 764-7456 after Tuesday.
FEIDERAL.SUMMER JOBS
Announcement No. 414-Summer jobs with the
federal government in a variety of fields. Highly
competitive. Apply early. Come to 3200 SAB for
details and application materials.
FEDEA SUMMER
INTERNSHIP PROGRAM:
Highly comnetitive internshins for graduate

tedly wants a long-term relationship
with Pakistan and is ready to seek
repeal of the U.S. ban on aid to Pakistan
because of that country's stated inten-
tion to develop a nuclear capability.
The White House announced a new $5.3
million contribution to a relief fund for
the estimated 500,000 Afghan refugees
who have swarmed into Pakistan
because of the fighting in their
homeland.
Brzezinski said he and Warren would
"consult with our Pakistani friends on
the situation created by the Soviet in-
vasion of 'Afghanistan and seek con-
crete ways and means of enhancing
peace and stability in this region."
He said the United States wanted to
do this "in a manner that threatens no
one and respects the independence and
integrity of all nations of this region,"
apparently suggesting India need not
worry about the U.S. plan to arm
Pakistan, its traditional foe.
THE U.S. delegation was to meet

with Shahi today for what officials said
might be a day-long discussion. Br-
zezinski planned to visit a camp for
Afghan refugees tomorrow and meet
with Zia later in the day.
In Moscow, the Soviet news agency
Tass took notice of Clark Clifford's visi
to India Thursday, ridiculing thew
presidential envoy's attempts to assure
Prime Minister Indira Gandhi of U.S.
intentions in bolstering Pakistan's
military posture.
Tass commentator Sergei Bulantsev
wrote that Clifford "impertinently"
tried to assuage Indian leaders "but
could not demonstrate with any degree
of persuasiveness who was threatening
PAkistan and why it was so necessary
for Islamabad to build up its military
machine."
In Washington, the State Department
raised the estimate of the number of
Soviet troops in Afghanistan to 92,000 -
7,000'more than previous estimates,.
and also reported widespread unrest
across the country.

Carter assures athletes
Of counter-Olympic games

(Continued from Page I)
Canada, Great Britain, the Netherlan-
ds, Norway, Luxembourg, Chile, Haiti,
Australia Fiji, New Guinea, New
Zealand, China, Djibouti, Zaire, Egypt,
Qatar and Saudi Arabia.
The State Department spokesman
stressed, however, that this position
had been adopted by the governments
of the countries he listed and did not
necessarily reflect the views of the
national Olympic committees in each
one. %
Calls by the Chinese and Japanese
governments for a boycott of the
Moscow Olympics gave added impetus
yesterday to President Carter's cam-
paign to pressure the Soviets and may
help sway some crucial European fen-
ce-straddlers, Olympic observers said.
THE OLYMPIC committees of 10
Western European nations and Egypt
met yesterday to discuss participation
in the 1980 Summer Olympics in
Moscow but adjourned without
reaching any decision.

The committees' members agreed
that the question of participation should
be left up to the national Olympic com-
mittee in each nation. The committees
left open a final decision pending a
meeting Feb.10 in Lake Placid, N.Y., of
the International Olympic Committee.
Joining the Egyptian committees in
endorsing that position were the com-
mittees of West Germany, Italy,
Belgium, Norway, Luxembourg,
.Holland, Great Britain, Denmark,
tSwitzerland and Spain.
Meanwhile, bearers of-the torch for
the Winter Olympic Games at Lake
Placid, N.Y., paused in the nation's
capital for a ceremony that included a
plea to the Soviet Union for "peace and
justice."
"I believe that the fact the Winter
Games are being held is a symbol of the@
fact that the Olympic spirit willcon-
tinue notwithstanding the present dif-
ficulties," Sen. Jacob Javits (R-N.Y.)
said.

(USPS 344-900)
Volume XC, No. 101
Saturday, February 2, 1980
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109.
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I*

"WHY DO THE HEATHEN RAGE?"
Psalms 2:1 and Acts 4:25

"THE FOOL HATH SAID IN HIS HEART, THERE IS NO
GOD. THEY ARE CORRUPT, THEY HAVE DONE
ABOMINABLE WORKS, THERE IS NONE THAT DOETH
GOOD. THE LORD LOOKED DOWN FROM HEAVEN UPON
THE CHILDREN OF MEN, TO SEE IF THERE WERE ANY
THAT DID UNDERSTAND, AND SEEK GOD. THEY ARE
ALL GONE ASIDE, THEY ARE ALTOGETHER BECOME
FILTHY. THERE IS NONE THAT DOETH GOOD, NO, NOT
ONE!"
This quote is the first three verses of the 14th Psalm, also of
the 53rd of Th6 Bible, God Almighty's Book of Messages to
man.
The New Testament confirms this appraisal of the natural
man In Romans 3:10-12, as, indeed, do all The Scriptures

Consider how this devil doctrine has' affected our own
great nation - until recent years probably the most God-
fearing and God blessed nation on the earth. By their own-
testimony R ussian officials are fools in the sight of God, yet
we gave them recognition a little over forty'years ago, and
now this corruption has so spread in our own land that we
don't permit the recognition of God Almighty in our public
schools, but give license to fools to teach our young the
Russian devil doctrine that there is no God.
Not only does God say that the fools who say there Is no
God are corrupt, but, also "they have done abominable
works!" How guilty they are of the abominable works of
oppression, persecution, mass murder, and no telling what
else! They planned "abominable works" for many other

Editor-in-Chief..................MARK PARRENT
Managing Editor........... .....MITCH CANTOR
City Editor..................... PATRICIA HAGEN
University Edito................. TOMAS MIRGA
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HOWARD WITT
Magazine Editors................. ELISA ISAACSON
-' R.J. SMITH
Arts Editors.. ......MARK COLEMAN
DENNIS HARVEY
Sports Editor...................GEOFF LARCOM
Executive Sports Editor................. BILLY SAHN
Managing Sports Editors.................BILLY NEFF

Business Manager.......... ROSEMARY WICKOW.KI
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Operations Manager........... KATHLEEN CULVER
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BUSINESS STAFF: Patrico Barron, Joseph Brodo.
Courtney Costeel, Randi Cigelink, Donna Drebin,
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