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January 27, 1980 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1980-01-27

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. > Free Pregnancy Testing
Immediate Results
Confidential Counseling
Complete Birth Control Clinic
> .Medicaid Blue Cross
'lAnn Arbor and
.. , X13}941-810Downriver area

i

Pace 2-Sunday, January 27, 1980-The Michigan Daily
Laotian refugee

y
t

,. (313) 559-0590 Southfield area.
, Northland Family Planning Clinic, Inc.

4

:.;

To the Freshman: It wouldn't be the
DEKE H OUSE
If there weren't some rumors about it.
Just for the record,
Here are some of the things we're not:
TEKES or QUARANTINED
Entirely GROOSE POINTE ARISTOCRATS
In the bar 24 hours a day, and so forth.
Come down and see us during Fraternity Rush Week at our
mysterious century old DEKE Chapel, 611 E. William Street,
next to White's Market.
DELTA KAPPA EPSILON, a Michigan tradition
since 1855, is back on campus.
F Aim Abo'ai' O e cu t Fiuedt
Kdwicte F ede Reatoitu d

FAIRFIELD, Iowa (AP) - The few
Laotian refugees in this southeast Iowa
farming community are "having
trouble inside" trying to understand
why a fellow refugee and his four
children were hanged from twine
nooses in the basement of their home.
Prosecutors, in the meantime, plan to
take the case to a grand jury. Police say
.Theng Pao Yang, 29, apparently
hanged his children and then hanged
himself. One of the children died.h
YI LY, 25, told police she found her
husband and their four children
hanging in their basement on Tuesday.
She quickly cut them down, but their
only son, eight-year-old So Yang Yang,
had died of strangulation.
Theng Pao was hospitalized in good
condition yesterday. His six-year-old
daughter, Bay, was listed in fair con-
dition. Two younger daughters,
three-year-old Chu and one-year-old
Mai Yai, were with their mother in
Fairfield.
The other five Laotian families who
have come here in the past year are
confused by it all.
"THEY FELT very sad," said Bar-
bara Hill, who teaches English to the
refugees. "They call it 'having trouble
inside.'
"They can understand a man wanting
to take his own life; this happens in
their country. But they do not under-
stand why he would kill the boy or why
Daily Official Bulletin
SUNDAY, JANUARY 27,1980
Daily Calendar:
Center for Near Eastern & North African Studies:
"A Round Table on Iran and Afghanistan: The
Current Crisis," MLB, Aud. 3, 1:45 p.m.
MONDAY, JANUARY 28,1980
Daily Calendar:
Near Eastern and North African Studies: Lois
Aroin, "Teaching About Palestine and the Arab-
Israeli Conflict in the 1980's," Lane Hall, noon.
SNY Research Group for Environmental Action;
'Perry Bullard, State Rep., "Current Environmental
Issues and Legislation in Michigan,1520 Dana, noon.
Macromolecular Res. Center: Amos Korin,
"Copolymers of Vinyl Fluoride," 3005 (hem., 4 p.m.
English Symposium in Critical Theory: Stanley
Fish, "How to Recognize a Poem When You See
One," Rtackham, 4 p.m.
Physics/Astronomy: S. Dimopoulos, Stanford-U.,
"The First 3 Seconds of The Universe," 2038 Randall,
4 p~m..
ELI/Near Eastern Studies: Shoshana Blum-
Kulka, "A Study of the Performance of Speech Acts
by Native Speakers and Second Language Learners
E. Conf., Rackham, 4 p.m.
School of Arch: Stanley Tigerman, "Toward an
American Architecture," Chrysler Center, 8 p.m.

he would try to hang his whole family."
eAuthorities are just as confused about
what happened, and why. Jefferson
County Attorney Edwin Kelly said
Friday he would call a grand jury to in-
vestigate the death of the boy.
KELLY SAID his investigation had
been hampered by the language barrier
and having to work through inter-
preters.
"There have been some discrepan-
cies," he said. "But we don't know if
these creep into the translation or for
some other reason."~
He also said he would ask the
Juvenile Court to decide whether the
state should seek custody of the Yang
children or offer some other form of
protection for the family.
THE FAMILY arrived in Fairfield on
Dec. 1 after spending five years in a
refugee camp in Thailand. Those who
-knew him agree that Theng Pao was
troubled because he left his mother and
stepfather behind in the camp.
But did the Yangs face more dif-
ficulties than the 4,500 other Southeast
Asian refugees who have come to Iowa?
The Rev. Lynn Bergfalk, pastor of the
First Baptist Church, which sponsored
the Yangs, said language barriers,
homesickness, and unemployment
were common problems among .the
refugees.

AP rPoto
HOLDING ONE OF HER children, Yi Ly Yang arrives at Evergreen
Cemetery to attend to graveside services of her 8-year-old son, So Yang.
Yang's husband and four children were found Tuesday hanging in the
basement; the others, except So Yeng, survived.

NOW PRESENTS:
Sunday Brunch
featuring:
FRESH MUFFINS
WAFFLES
PANCAKES
AND OMELETTES
NEW HOURS
S 2oam-2:30pm

Kennedy prepares policy speech

314 E. LIBERTY
ANN ARBOR

662-2019

. _

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
.. CUSPS 344-9400)
Volume XC, No. 96
Sunday, January 27, 1980
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. Published
SUNDAY: daily Tuesday through Sunday morn-
ings during the University year at 420
SPAG H ETTI NIGH T Ma nard Streets Ann Arbor, Michigan
481 9. Subscription rates: $12 Septem-
"All the pasta you can eat ber through April (2 semesters); $13 by
for only $2.50" mail outside Ann Arbor. Summer
session published Tuesday through
And on'MONDAY NIGHT Saturday mornings. Subscription rates:
$6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7.00 by mail out-
EnjoyRick's Burritos side Ann Arbor. Second class postage
IY paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POST-
only $1.25 MASTER: Send address changes to
BEER SPECIAL THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard
Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.

From APand UPI
WASHINGTON -Sen. Edward Ken-
nedy arranged briefings with State
Department, Pentagon and CIA of-
ficials yesterday in preparation for a
highily' publicized policy speech he
hopes will turn his presidential acam-
paign around.
Kennedy, following a dismal showing
last week in the Iowa caucuses, can-
celed a scheduled four-day campaign
swing through New England to devote
adequate tig'e to his speech tomorrow
at Georgetown University in
Washington.
KENNEDY WAS briefed at the State
Department yesterday afternoon by
Deputy SEcre3tary of State Warren
Christopher.,
He also was to meet later in the day
with CIA officials at his Senate office,
and with a top Defense Department of-
ficial at the Pentagon.
He met Friday with U.N. Secretary
General Kurt Waldheim, presumably
about the situation in Iran, in
preparation for the speech.
KENNEDY HAS been secretive
about the speech, but word has leaked
out it will deal with foreign policy and
seek to open up discussion of the
nation's problems overseas, including
Iran and Afghanistan.
His cancellation of the campaign
,swing through Maine and New Ham-
pshire - two states he acknowledges he
must win to remain a viable candidate
-has focused attention on it.
After delivering the speech
tomorrow, Kennedy's updated schedule
calls for him to travel to New York for a
fund raiser. He speaks to a labor group
in Philadelphia and then leaves Wed-
nesday for an extended campaign
swing through New York.
BEFORE KENNEDY challenged
President Carter, few questioned the
senator's credentials as a winner or the
likelihood he would whip Carter and
sweep to the nomination.
Carter's popularity was at an historic
low. ft seemed likely that Americans
would be paying $1 a gallon for home
heating oil and the same for gasoline. If ,
those numbers came true they would
destroy the president in the New Ham-
pshire primary, it was said.
"I .don't think that he ( Kennedy )
could be denied the Democratic
nomination if he were to run," House
Speaker Thomas O'Neill said last Sep-
tember.

IN NEW HAMPSHIRE people are
paying $1 a gallon for home heating oil
and as much as $1.25 a gallon for
gasoline. Nonetheless, Carter has a
good chance of winning the Democratic
primary in Kennedy's own backyard
and scoring a quick knockout in the
race for the presidential nomination.
Kennedy's campaign is low on money
and lower on morale and he
acknowledges he must carry the Maine
caucuses on Feb. 10 and the New Ham-,
pshire primary on deb. 26.
But the last two weeks of his losing
campaign in Iowa saw Kennedy
criticizing Carter repeatedly for "lur-
ching from crisis to crisis."
KENNEDY HAS avoided ciiticizing

The embassy takeover
three days before Kennedy
his candidacy for president.

happen
announce

Indiana Chrysler
workers OK contract

Carter's effort to win release of the
Americans held hostage in the U.S.
Embassy in Tehran. His one direct
foray into the Iranian situation was his
criticism early in December of the
exiled Shah of Iran, who, Kennedy said,
"ran one of the most violent regimes
the history of mankind."
That statement stirred a storm of
criticism of Kennedy.
In part, it reflected the senator's
frustration with the Iranian situation,
which has dogged his campaign since
its outset.

i

a

RESIDENT STAFF APPLICATION FORMS
FOR 1980-81 ACADE MIC YEAR
Available Starting January 17, 1980
!n Ms. Charlene Coady's Office, 1500 SAB
POSITIONS INCLUDE: Resident Director, Assistant
Resident Director, Resident
Advisor, Head Librarian, Resident
Fellow, Minority Peer Advisors
and Graduate Student Teaching
Assistant
Advisory positions require the completion of a minimum of 55 credit hours by the end of the 1980
Winter Term for the Resident Fellows in Residential College, Resident Advisor and MinorityPeer
Advisor positions; Graduate status for Graduate Student Teaching Assistant in Pilot Program,
Head Librarian, and Resident Director positions. However, qualified undergraduate applicants
may be considered for the Resident Director positions.
QUALIFICATIONS: (1) Must be a registered U. of M. student on the Ann Arbor Campus
during the period of employment. (2) Must have completed a minimum of 55 credit hours by the
end of the 1980 Winter Term. (3) Preference will be given to applicants who have lived in resi-
dence halls at University level for at least one year. (4) Undergraduate applicants must have a
2.5 cumulative grade point average in the school or.college in which they are enrolled. Graduate
applicants must be in good academic standing at the end of the 1979 Fall term in the school or
college in which they are enrolled. (5) Preference is given to applicants who do not intend to
carry heavy academic schedules and who do not have rigorous outside commitments. (6)
Applicants with children will not be considered. (7) Proof of these qualifications may be required.

INDIANAPOLIS (UPI) - Chrysler.
workers in Indiana have approved the
' United Auto Workers' modified con-
tract with the financially-troubled
automaker by a margin of almost 10 to
1.
Only one local's votes were still un-
counted late Friday.
WORKERS IN Indianapolis, New
Castle and Kokomo voted over-
whelmingly in favor of ratifying the
new contract, which called for
numerous concessions on the part of
the workers.
Region 3 Director Dallas Sells said he
was pleased by the large margin in
favor of the pact, adding the vote
"reflects the fact that Chrysler workers
understand the problem and are willing
to make the sacrifice necessary."
The renegotiated contract called for
$446 million in concessions by the
workers, mostly in the form of delayed
raises, less benefits and fewer days off.
In exchange,. Chrysler will issue
about $162.5 million in stock for its UAW
workers.
'The 16,410,030 shares traded at the
New York Stock Exchange on Black
Tuesday, Oct. 29, 1929, set a volume
record that lasted until April1, 1968.

protest.

0

ag ainst draft
U.S action
(Continued from Page 1)
situation and would like to gear up war
sentiment to get re-elected and solve
economic problems.
"During wartime work increases, bu
after a war there are no jobs," DuBois
said
Supporting theSoviets.in
Afghanistan, DuBois said when the U.S.
goes into a country, backwardness
among the people is perpetuated.
DUBOIS CRITICIZED the system of
democracy in this country and said it
works only when there is no threat to
the bourgeoisie.
"The Black Panthers were opposed
the system and were shot up," DuBois
said.
"Do you think there's freedom for
black auto workers in this country whr'
are left without a job?" Manning sal"
Use Daily
Class if ieds

SYL stages

Ratification of the contract wa
proceeding well nationwide,
spokesman for UAW International
Headquarters in Detroit said. The votes
were expected to be completed by Feb.
1.

STUDY IN EUROPE
The University of Louvain (est. 1425)
Leuven, Belgium
OFFERS
COMPLETE PROGRAMS IN PHILOSOPHY
FOR THE DEGREES OF B.A., M.A., AND PH.D.
PLUS
A JUNIOR YEAR ABROAD PROGRAM
Write to: Secretary English Program, H.I.W.
Kardinaal Marcierplein 2
B-3000 Leuven, Belgium

svPec "

or o eVĀ°1

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