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January 10, 1980 - Image 14

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The Michigan Daily, 1980-01-10

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01

Page 14-Thursday, January 10, 1980-The Michigan Daily

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INDIANA, PURDUE NEXT ON AGENDA:
Surprising cagers

face roadblock

By ALAN FANGER
Johnny Orr's Christmas list was pret-
ty straightforward: a few wins here, a
few more there (New Orleans), con-
tinued improvement from Ike Person,
steady play from Marty Bodnar and
Mike McGee, a healthier Paul Heuer-
man. It was nothing Santa Claus
couldn't handle.
And in keeping with the spirit of the
holiday season, most of Orr's wishes
were answered. His Michigan cagers
entered the new decade with a 7-2 non-
conference record, a surprise to many
who had downgraded the Wolverines
from the very beginning.
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celebration, Orr's cagers slipped by
Minnesota and Iowa in two conference
games at Crisler Arena last week. The
sweep placed the Wolverines atop the
Big Ten along with Wisconsin and Ohio
State. More importantly, it gave them
added confidence going into a three-
game road trip which begins tonight in
Bloomington against the 19th-ranked
Indiana Hoosiers (7-4).
Although Michigan is fighting a 13-
year losing jinx in Hoosierland, it may
benefit from an unbelievable rash of in-
juries which have befallen Bobby
Knight's crew. Star forward Mike
Woodson has already been lost for the
season with a back injury, while guard
Randy Wittman and forwards Steve
Bouchie and Ted Kitchel are sitting out
with various ailments.
"This is a tough trip for any team,"
said assistant coach gill Frieder in
reference to Michigan's trip to Indiana,

followed by an invasion of ninth-ranked
Purdue on Saturday. "We're playing
extremely well. We're going in with a
great mental attitude. We're just really
ready to go. The fact that we're playing
well gives us some hope," said Frieder.
A GREAT DEAL of hope was
provided by junior center Paul Heuer-,
man, whose duplicate 12-point efforts
against Minnesota and Iowa earned
him the Big Ten player of the week
citation.
Both Orr and Frieder believe the
Wolverines will have to be at nothing
less than their best against the
Hoosiers, despite their injuries. Indiana
is 0-2 in the conference, having lost
heartbreakers on the road to Ohio
State, 59-58, and Wisconsin, 52-50.
"The fact that they're 0-2 means
nothing," said Frieder. "They'll have
fire in their eyes. We'll have to have as
good a shot selection as we did against
Minnesota and Iowa."
HERE, THEN, is a brief recap of
basketball action which took place
during the holiday break:
Western Michigan, December 22 -
By game's end, Orr concededthat the
Broncos were a better team than
anyone was willing to admit.
Nonetheless, they couldn't run with the
Wolverines, who fast-breaked Western
almost back to Kalamazoo. McGee led
all scorers with 29 points, as the
Wolverines gradually expanded a 34-26
halftime lead and cruised to an 83-64
victory. The Broncos hit on 55 per cent
of their shots,. but the Michigan zone
held them to 55 attempts.
Mississippi, December 28 - The
Rebels,,who were 5-4 against mediocre
opposition coming into the Sugar Bowl
tournament, held off a late Michigan
surge to hand the Wolverines their
second defeat of the season, 71-66. The

two-man team of Elston Turner and
John Stroud combined for 51 points as
the Rebels shot the lights out of the
Louisiana Superdome, hitting nearly 68
per cent from the floor. Johnny Johnson
led Michigan with 16 points, while Thad
Garner chipped in 15.
IN THE consolation game, Michigan
nipped Tulane, 72-71. Perhaps the most
surprising aspect of the tournament
was the attendance, or lack thereof. A-
two-night total of only 8,000 fans made
the cavernous stadium seem like "a
mausoleum," according to one
Michigan spokesman.
Minnesota, January 3 - The worry of
the coaching staff prior to this Big Ten
opener was the Gophers' substantial
size advantage. Early in the game,
coach Jim Dutcher played a front line
of 6-10 Gary Holmes, 6-11 Kevin
McHale, and 7-2 Randy Breuer.
Despite what seemed to be a trees vs.
bushes predicament, the Blue cagers
hung onto a precariously small lead in
the last five minutes to win, 71-67. The

3 OT LOSS TO TECH

lcers 2nd in GLIT

surprising Wolverine defense turner
the trick again, as it held the shar,
pshooting McHale to a meager 11shots.
McGee paced all scorers with 23 points,
while Breuer, a freshman center, had"
17 for the Gophers.
Iowa, January 5 - The Hawkeyes in-
vaded Crisler with an undefeated.
record and a number nine ranking.
Iowa's condition wasn't ideal, however,
as guard Ronnie Lester sat the game-
out with a knee injury. The Hawkeye*
thus lost a good deal of quickness and
mobility outside, and their attempt to
compensate for Lester's absence
resulted in a weaker rebounding team.
After trailing 39-34 through one half,
Michigan controlled the tempo and the
boards in the final twenty minutes. The
Wolverines were leading 66-65 when.
guard Keith Smith hit both ends of a
one-and-one situation with only three
seconds showing on the clock, icing the
victory. McGee once again toppe*
Michigan, pouring 25 points through the
nets. Forward Vince Brookins equalled.
that total for the Hawkeyes.

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By MARK BOROWSKI
The almost-finished Joe Louis Arena
opened the doors to host the 15th annual
Great Lakes Invitational Tournament
(GLIT) over the holiday break, and the
record setting crowds that turned out
for the two day event were greeted by a
mammoth stairway, upfinished
refreshment stands with cold hot dogs,
and a lot of dust.
But all was not lost for the fans as
,Michigan, Michigan Tech, Wisconsin,
and Michigan State provided some of
-the most exciting hockey to be seen in
years by Detroit spectators..
The largest crowd ever to watch a
college hockey game witnessed
Michigan Tech edge the Wolverines 5-4
in the third overtime period to claim its
fourth consecutive GLIT champion-
ship. It was the ninth straight time that
Tech has beaten Michigan.
Tech squeezed jby Wisconsin 1-0 and
Michigan clobbered Michigan State 7-4
in the first round on Dec. 28 to gain en-
try into the finals.
With the Bulldogs leading 4-1 and only
seven minutes to play, many of the
17,642 fans started to head for the exits.
Thirty-two seconds later Blue defen-
seman John Blum let a slapshot go that
sailed past Tech goalie Frank Krieber
to bring the Wolverines to within two
goals. The never-say-die Michigan
team scored again less than two
minutes later when GLIT MVP Murray
Eaves slapped in a rebound off the pads

of Krieber, and suddenly, the
Wolverines were back in the game.
Krieber and his defensemen stymied
several Michigan efforts to tie the
game. Then, with six seconds left in
regulation time, a Huskie was sent to
the penalty box fok interference, and
Tech was forced to play one man short.
Michigan coach Dan Farrell pulled his
goalie and lined up six attacker
outside Tech's blue line.
Senior Dan Lerg won the face-off for
Michigan,'nand Bruno Baseotto hurried
the puck into the Huskies' end. He then
dumped off in the direction of Eaves,
who dove and swung his stick at the
puck, knocking it past a sprawled
Krieber with only one second left to tie.
the score.
The Huskies finally broke the,
deadlock at 2:28 of the third 10-minut.
overtime period, as Mel Pearsor
knocked in his own rebound.
But the loss was not all that disap-K
pointing to Farrell. "As long as you
play good, that's what is important. I
thought we played very well; not'many
teams can come back when down by*
three goals," he said.
Wisconsin destroyed the Spartans 10-
4 in the consolation game.
Last weekend Boston College and:
Princeton invaded Yost Ice Arena anc
headed back East empty-handed.
Michigan upended Boston College 7-3
Friday night and Princeton 4-1 Satur-
day night.

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