100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 25, 1980 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-01-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

s

The Michigan Daily-Friday, Januar4 25, 1980-Page 7
U to evict child care center

B'y CATHY BROWN
The Child Care Action Center was
formally notified by the University
yesterday that it must leave its quar-
ters on the third floor of the School of
Education Building no later than July 1.
The notice, issued by acting Vice-
President for Academic Affairs Alfred
Sussman, blames the eviction on the
Center's failure to comply with fire
safety codes and also cites the
Education School's need for more
teaching and research space.
"OUR UNDERSTANDING is that it
(the notice) comes from the Executive

Board," said Margaret Elias, co-
director of the program. "We started
looking for ways to raise money and
make the space safe but when we went
and told Carolyn Davis (associate vice
president of academic affairs) and she
told the executive officers, they said
no."
The center, which is non-profit and
independent of the University, was
begun in the early 70's to provide child
care in the area. Occupying the space
rent-free, the program was first not
found in compliance with fire codes in
the fall of 1977. It has been looking for a

new home since then, but has failed to
find one.
"We have come to the end of the
strategies we had available to us," said
Elias.
ESTABLISHED WITH a "commit-
ment to advocacy for children and for
children's, issues," the center has an
enrollment of 39 children, and a waiting
list that averages between 80 to 120,
depending upon the time of year. Some
of the children are "on the list at six
months and we can't take them until
they're two years old,"'said Kathleen
Smiley, Elias' partner at the center.

The University is instituting a task
force to determine the need for child
care on North Campus and to deter-
mine whether it is financially feasible,
according to Davis. The force will con-
sist of six or seven parents and
professional staff, whom the board is
still contacting to get their approval.
She added, however, that the task force
and executive board probably couldn't
begin looking into a solution until
sometime this summer.
Davis also said "'the task force is not
set up to find them (the center) a
home."
Elias views the task force as a long-
term proposition," which is "not really
going to do anything for people who
need child care at this point."

to< ,,sue

Sociologist says U.S. power
is shifting on world scene

By ELAINE RIDEOUT
By the year 2,000, economic power
will shift from the "Western block" to
Asia and third world countries, Har-
vard,Sociology Professor Daniel Bell
predicted yesterday in his final lecture
of the 1979-80 William Cook Lecture
Series.
"Asia will become a major
economical center by the year 2,000,"
he told a large crowd in the Rackham
Amphitheatre yesterday afternoon.
"By then, 25 per cent of all industry will
Become out of developing countries, as
opposed to 6.6 per cent today. "Industry"
in the West will be reduced unless there
is a large scale effort of protectionist
policy."
BELL SAID America was in its
"third revolution," having left the in-
dustrial scene behind and entered into a
post-industrial society. "The political
and economic arenas of the world are
changing," he said. "By the 1990's the
cold war we have renewed today will be
diminished as world powers undergo
U prof: Af
By BETH PERSKY
The Soviet invasion of Afghanistan
presents no threat to the vital interests
of the Middle East, according to
Political Science Professor Allen
Whiting. There does exist, however, the
threat of war between the Soviet Union
and the United States,he added.
Whiting, in a speech sponsored by the
Michigan International Relations
Society, addressed a group of more
than 50 in the League library last night.
THE PR I NT crisis,, he said, is
unlike the Berlin crisis or the Cuban
missile crisis of the early 1960s, or the
alert after the Yom Kippur war in 1973.
In all past situations there was a direct
line between Moscow and Wasoington,
-. and immediate communication and
calculation could prevent a major war.
Report says Pa.
reactor was close
to a meltdown
WASHINGTON (AP) - Last year's
accident at the Three Mile Island
nuclear power plant came within "30 to
60" minutes of a meltdown that would
have required evacuation of thousands
of people in the area, a special in-
vestigating team reported yesterday.
The Special Inquiry Group, headed
by private attorney Mitchell Rogovin,
recommended to the government that
future nuclear power plants be located
10 miles or more away from population
centers. It said some existing plants too
close to cities might have to be shut
down.
But the group left it up to the Nuclear
Regulatory Commission to figure out
how local circumstances should in-
fluence those decisions.

processes of interior fragmentation."
He explained that although there will be
an economic shift to the East,
technology will remain centered in the
West.
America's decline in the world
market is supposed to result from a
change in production techniques. "New
kinds of technology will lead to a break
away from mass t production," he
predicted. "Firms as we know them,
such as U.S. Steel, may be passing. The
breakup of AT&T is coming." Bell ad-
ded that he expects that only eight auto
companies will survives through the
next decade.
Bell, who served on the President's
Commission on Technology,
Automation and Economic Progress in
166, didn't say what would happen to
workers displaced by technology. "The
fear of automation voiced in the sixties
was displaced, but this was before
micro-processes, falling cost curves
and de-industrialization. This issue will
come back in a more realistic way in
the eighties."

IN BELL'S post-industrial society,'
workers will no longer be tied to
machines.
Bell believes that the changes will
come in relation to science and in-
novation on-the-job: "The percentage of
people working in information
processing fields, suchas computer
programming, is on the rise."
In Bell's opinion, even the class struc-
ture will' change. Bell states that the
class struggle will no longer lie within
the factory gate, instead it will become
a public responsibility to underwrite an
individual working for a profit. "Paten-
ts will become outdated," he said as in-
dividual inventions become 'public
goods'."
Bell considers the problem of inter-
national division of labor to be a big one
in the near future. "There is a growing
demographic imbalance throughout the
world." He said that in countries such
as Africa, Asia and Mexico, 40 to 50 per
cent of the population are under 17
years old.

Erected in 27 B.C., rebuilt in the
second century and.. converted into a
Christian temple in 609, the Pantheon at
Rome has served as a place of worship
for 20 centuries.
Bowling Tournament
For Women
Sat. Jan. 26
10 a.m.
at UNION LANES
Winners go to
Kent State Univ.
Open Tonight
Till 1 AM
Billiards
Pinball
and Bowling
at the UNION
10% D/SCOUNT
on Stephen Products
Mon., Tues., Wed.
U-M Stylists
at THE UNION-
OPEN 8:30am-5:1 5pm Mon.-Sat.

U)
Z-
z
w
0

eellps
t B1THOD1Y
HOLLE~flD
saxaphones
A. SPEnICER
BEIREFIELD
guitars

'ghan invasion no threat

This time, said Whiting, each of the
superpowers is involved with regimes
throughout the area "that are ripe for
collapse." Each of the two nations, he
added, is willing to commit itself to a
situation where "communication, com-
promise, and retreat become difficult."
The interpretation of the situation~by
President Carter and the media has a
direct relationship to the mounting of
tension and the handling of the
situation, according to Whiting.
"IF THE ' president defines the
stuationin 'near-apocalyptic terms, it
will require not just negotiations but
preparation," he said.
TWO VERY important factors - the
history and the geography of the region
- are missing from both the media and

the presidential treatment of the
situation, Whiting emphasized.
He refuted Carter's recent claim that
Afghanistan is a "stepping stone" to
mideast oil.
"If the Soviet Union had wanted to go
for the mideast oil, it's a hell of a way
around the corner to go through
Afghanistan whe'n at any time at all
they could've gone in (through Iran),"
said Whiting. The Soviet Union borders
both on Afghanistan and Iran, and
Whiting said the people of northern Iran
support the SovietUnion.
The Soviets have all the oil they need
already, he added - they have an
agreement to receive Iranian oil, as
well as large deposits in the Caspian
Sea region of their own country.

one show only
TONIGHT AT NINE
in east quad's
R C AUDITORIUM
THERE WILL BE A FREE
WORKSHOP THIS
AFTERNOON AT 4:00 PM
IN THE RC AUDITORIUM

E

all welcome! bring

your axe!

INFO

763-2071

The Ann Arbor Film Cooperstivie Presents at MLB: $1.50
- FRIDAY, JANUARY25
MONKEY BUSINESS
(Norman Z. McLeod, 1931) 7 & 10:20-MLB 3
The Marx brothers stow away on the unluckiest ship since the Titantic. The plot is purely incidental
as usual. But see Groucho and Lucille in the closet! Thrill to the amazing fingers of Chico on the 88'3E
Hear Harpo sing like Chevalier! "Think about it too much and sanity, like a wilted lettuce leaf, begins
to wilt and curl at the edges."-Pauline Kael Plus short: BETTY IN BLUNDERLAND.
(Norman Z. McLeod, 1931) HORSE FEATHERS 8:40-NLB3
More of the Marx brothers in their unceasing war against just about everything. Groucho descends
on a university as the new president in order to graduate his son, Zeppo. and to win the annual football
classic. "The secret word is 'swordfish."' Plus short: THE DENTIST. (W.C. Fields).
Tomorrow: Dustin Hoffman in STRAW DOGS
and THE GRADUATE at MLB
Hal Ashby's 1972
HAROLD AND MAUDE
A classic cult film which features one of the screen's most unlikely pairs-
denying everything you've seen or known about screen lovers. Bud Curt is
Narold, a young man bored with life and wealth, but fascinated with death.
Ruth Gordon is Maude, a woderfuI old woman who can see nothing but
good intentions in the world. Music by Cat Stevens. SHORT: Those Little
Rascals in CAME THE BRAWN.
Sat: Woody Allen's ANNIE HALL
Sun: THE BOFORS GUN
TONIGHT AT OLD ARCH. AUD.
CINEMA GUILD T..O . $1.50

ODI~I lii~i l

I

c w

0o

everydayI
prices
$549I.ps
$ 5.49 tapes

a
w

a

lnusT Wait/Stp~ur Sobbig
Kid!Brass lnPockcet

J

1

XTC
drums and wires

Ann Arbor's
lowest priced
record and
tape store

A N N A sOR
523 E Lib
994 -80

erty
D31

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan