100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 24, 1980 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-01-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'I
The Michigan Daily-Thursday, January 24, 1980-Pag.3:
S. *.~.*. ~ . *.~.*. ~ . ~ . .*.*.*.*.*.*. . .*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*. .*.*....................
S........................,. ~ ~ N .~ N ..
S~.....................................................................

Students
.lukewarm on
registration
for draft

By MITCH STUART
Before President Carter confirmed in his
State of the Union address last night that he in-
tends to reinstate draft registration, University
students seemed to agree on one thing: they're
not ready to decide for certain whether or not
they would actually go into the armed forces if
called upon to do so after registering.
The heads of both the University's Army
Reserve Officer Training Program (ROTC)
and Air Force ROTC said yesterday they per-
sonally felt registration would be a good idea,
especially since it would increase the
preparedness level of the armed forces.
BESIDES THE expected split between those
students for and against registration, there was
another category. Some students said they

were willing to register but would refuse to en-
ter the military if, as one student put it, "My
number comes up."
"If it (registration) would help the national
security, I'm for it," said Clay Williams; an
engineering junior.
But both he and Jeff Sonenshein, LSA senior
agreed, "If drafted, I'm off to another coun-
try."
ENGINEERING FRESHMAN Dave Vella
felt differently. "If you're going to register, you
might as well go. It (registering but refusing to
be drafted) seems to contradict your own
thoughts."
There was a sense of urgency. "Something
has to be done," said LSA junior Tom Jacob.
"(Weneed) a showof force."'
Some students were willing to wait for more

developments. "I don't think it's necessary
yet," said one LSA sophomore.
Dean Keith, an engineering senior, said, "I
don't like Soviet aggression, but I can't con-
ceivably consider myself in combat status of
any kind."
Col. Frank Reeder, commander of the
University's Air Force ROTC, said he doesn't
think Carter is moving to reinstate the draft. "I
personally don't believe that he (Carter) has as
ulterior motive the reinstatement of the draft."
MAJ. JOE BLAIR, head of the University's
Army ROTC concurred. "The government
policy is that the non-draft situation is working
and the government isn't going to reinstate the
draft."
Reeder and Blair stressed that their com-
ments were personal beliefs and not policy.

BLair compared U.S. manpower with Soviet
manpower. "A guy drafted in Kiev or Moscow
can be in Afghanistan in a week serving guard
duty. We can't do that in this country."
Blair continued, "We don't have the man-
power pool (that) the Soviets have. . . that we
used to have."
Reeder commented on reports that Carter
might reinstate registration. "It's another
means of showing determination on his (Car-
ter's) part to ensure security of peace in the
Western world."
Blair said he supports the conscientious ob-
jector idea. He added: "I think if we remain
strong as a people - if we remain strong
morally and spiritually - that's our fir-
st line of defense. Then back that up
with an adequate military force."

x..............................................x*,. ".r........>, .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .,.=._«.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. m '
x _.. . ...._.e._ -- °s.. . ...

,-

, ._

Japan predicted to
deport McCartney

---- - -.

TOKYO (AP) - An expert on
Japanese drug law predicted yesterday
that former Beatle Paul McCartne\
will not be imprisoned on marijuana
possession charges, but instead will be
deported and "never be allowed back in
Japan."
"But before he goes, he should stand
up in court and say there is nothing
wrong with smoking marijuana," said
Hidehiro Nlarui, a Japanese lawyer
who specializes in marijuana trials.
MARUI MADE the comment as-Mc-
Cartney marked his first week in Japan
inside a Tokyo jail on suspicion of nar-
cotics violations.
While authorities declined to com-
ment on the eventual outcome of the
case, Marui said he believed the 37-
year-old British rock music star would
in all likelihood be deported within the.
next couple of weeks.

McCartney, arrested'And jailed on his
arrival Jan. 16 after customs agents
said they found 7.7 ounces of marijuana
in his luggage during a routine inspec-
tion, has been ordered to remain in
detention until Monday for further
questioning.
THE DETENTION could be extended
by another 10 days if the Tokyo
prosecutor's office deemed ' it
necessary. After that, officials would
have to decide whether to press charges
on marijuana possession or drop the
case.
Marui said, "Normally anyone
caught with such a large amount of
marijuana - whether he be a Japanese
or loreigner - would be jailed. But this
is an unusual case and I think McCar-
tney will be kicked out of the country."
McCartnev's lawyer could not be
reached yesterday for comment.

BIG SPECIEL
Mon.-Tues.-Wed.
BILLI6RDS at ,'/ price
MICHIGAN PIN BOWLING
win a FREE game
at the UNION 10am to 6pm
CONTOCT LENS SPECIOL
. Soft & Hard* Contact Lens $17810
*2 pairs
Includes all professional fees
Offer ends February 1
Dr. Paul C. Uslan, Optometrist
545 Church Stree
769-1222 by appointment

AP Photo
EX-BEATLE PAUL McCARTNEY will probably be deported, rather than
being imprisoned, predicted an expert on Japanese law. The expert called
McCartney's predicament "an unusual case."

Prof discusses revamping

By ELAINE RIDEOUT
Harvard Sociology Prof. Daniel Bell
described an America which is in-
creasingly. fragmented politically, but
which continues to operate with a
largely unifed economy, yesterday af-
ternoon at the second of this year's
William W. Cook Lectures on American
Institutions.
Bell said he views as "frightening"
the fragmentation characteristic of
American politics over the last 40.

years. States are pitted against, other
states over such issues as where to
dump nuclear wastes.
"IT'S A BIG mismatch," he said.
"Our county borders were set up to en-
sure that the county seat was only one
day away by horseback for everyone in
the county. County lines don't make
sense' anymore, and neither do, state
lines.
"The .old party machinery is also
losing its meaning," Bell explained.
Before long, he said, the U.S. will move

FILMS

School of Public Health-Noontime Film Fest, You're Too Fat, Public
Health Aud. II,12:10p.m.
Habitat-Development without Tears,, Water: The Hazardous Necessity,
Art/Arch. Auditorium, N. C ampus, 12:30 p.m.
Mediatrics-Funny Girl, Nat. Sci. Aud.. 6:30, 9:15 p.m.
Ann Arbor Film Co-op-2401: A Space Odyssey, Aud. A, Angell, 6:30, 9:30
p.m.
Cinema Guild-Murmur of the Heart, Old Arch Aud., 7, 9:15p.m.
MEETINGS
Michigan Christian Fellowship Meeting-7:00 p.m., Michigan Union.
Check main entrance for exact location.
Michigan Employment and Training Services Council-Public Hearing,
Holiday Inn, 2900 Jackson Road, 7:30 p.m.
School of Metaphysics:- Class in Metaphysics, Ann Arbor School of
Metaphysics, 2191/ N. Main St., 7:30 p.m.
LECTURES
Museum of Anthropology-Margaret Schoeninger, "Human Dietary
Change Between Moustarian and Mesolithic Period Populations in the Near
East," 2009 Museums Bldg., noon.
Michigan Highway Research Institute-Saul Steinberg, "Motor Programs
and the Timing of Rapid Actions in Speech and Typing," 1057 MHRI, 3:45
p.m.
Michigan Economic Society-Harold Shapiro, Saul Hymans, "The
Michigan Model," Lansing Lounge, Economics Bldg:., 4 p.m.
Career Placement & Planning-Dedria Bryfonski and Mike Knepper,
"Careers in Publishing," West Conference Room, 4 p.m.
Michigan Student Assembly-South Africa divestment lobbying
workshop, Pendleton Room, Michigan Union, 7 p.m.
Women in Communication, Inc.-"Women at Michigan: Their History,
Their Activities, Their Careers, Their Future", Welker Room, Michigan
Union,7 p.m.
Chemistry Department-Peter Wagner, "The Importance of Confir-
mational Mob Mobility and/or Charge Transfer in Organic
Photochemistry," 1300 Chemistry, 8 p.m.
Viewpoint Lectures-John Aristotle Phillips, "Energy for the Future,"
Rackham Auditorium, 8p.m.
PERFORMANCES
Center for Japanese Studies and Department of English Language and
Literature-Gozo Yoshimasu, poetry reading, Pendleton Room, Michigan
Union, 3:30 p.m.
Studio Theatre Series-Two original one-act plays, Arena Theatre, Frieze
Building, 4:10 p.m.
Guild House-Poetry reading, Tasos Belas, 802 Monroe, 7:30 p.m.
School of Music-Robert Warner: Dragons, Gorged Serpents, Marine
Monsters, and Beautiful Women, Stearns, 8 p.m.
Soundstage Coffeehouse-David Sheare, guitarist; Matthew Alexander,
guitar and piano; Casual Connection, jazz; University Club, 8 p.m.-
midnight.
Ark-Footloose, 1421 Hill, 9 p.m.
MISCELLANEOUS

f gov't institutions
to a national primary where a party economy was a
chooses a candidate in one day. "We until 50 years
have the technology to one day make a opinion, the gov
national referendum possible," he focal point for de
predicted. BUT WITHI
"The traffic light regulates lives-it America has b
is agreat social invention," he told the diversified to be
small crowd at the Rackham Am- society, he said.
phitheatre. "It is a regulatory device "Before this,
that really works within a minimum nation, but nevet
amount of time. We want to make more took revolutions
effective the instruments we do have to communicationt
keep up with a changing society." explained. But a
BELL WANTS to rework many and society a
government institutions in order to problems in the f
keep up with what he calls "changes in "Now there is
scale." There are certain structural mobilization, an
problems that governments of advan- space on a huge
cing societies will fate to face. As a example as the 1
result of these changes, our lives will be Dr. Martin L
changed in a variety of ways." mobilized half a
The problem of govrnmental size, ch in Washington
Bell said, is "one of the oldest and most Some of Bell's
crucial problems of political theorists." his ideas neo-co
Through time, he explained, a general and politically
fear that the large size of government
could lead to the establishment of
despotism existed. Bell said the
problem had not asrisen in the U.S.
because decision-making in a market
2 Irahian
students
charged with
death threat
DETROIT (UPI) - Two Iranian
students who attended Wayne County
Community College arrested on
charges of threatening to kill President
Carter have been indicted by a federal
grand jury on a 'reduced firearms
charge, authorities announced yester-
day.
One student, Mehdi Fazelzadeh-
Haghighi, 29, arrested Jan. 18 by Secret
Service agents, was arraigned yester-
day before U.S. Magistrate Barbara
Hackett. He was ordered held under
$10,000 bond.
THE SECOND student, Mehran Ab-
deshah, 20, was arrested Tuesday by
Secret Service agents in Washington,
D.C. He was to be returned to Detroit
and faced a court appearance today, of-
ficials said.
Secret Service agents said the two
students had made "repeated threats"
against President Carter and the '
deposed shah of Iranaover a two-month
period late last year.
U.S. Attorney James Robinson said
the threatening charge against
Fazelzadeh-Haghighi, which carries a
maximum penalty of five years in
prison and a $1,000 fine, was dismissed
pending further investigation.
The indictment returned against the
two students Tuesday charged them
with possession of an unregistered
firearm - a sawed-off, Japanese-made
rifle.

decentralized process
ago. Now, in Bell's
ernment has become a
cision-making.
N the last 40 years
ecome large and too
ehave as a "national"
we had an identity as a
r a national society-it
in transportation and
to make us one," Bell
nationalized economy
pparently leads to
suture, he said.
a rising crescendo of
A the loss of isolation
scale." Bell cited one
963 televised appeal by
uther King which
million people to mar-
l.
colleagues have called
nservative-culturally
moderate.

YOU CAN BECOME INVOLVED IN AN IMPORTANT,
MEANINGFUL MOVEMENT FOR WORLD PEACE AS A
PEACE CORPS VOLUNTEER, AND HELP PEOPLE IN A
THIRD-WORLD COUNTRY WITH PROBLEMS OF POV-
ERTY, HUNGER IGNORANCE AND DISEASE.
IF YOU ARE WILLING TO SHARE YOUR SKILLS WITH
PEOPLE WHO REALLY NEED THEM AND ARE ABLE
TO PUT OFF CLIMBING THAT LADDER, GETTING
THOSE BENEFITS, AND ACCUMULATING POSES-
SIONS, CONSIDER THE PEACE CORPS AS AN AL-
TERNATIVE FOR TWO YEARS OF YOUR LIFE.
SEE RECRUITERS:
WEST ENGINEERING BLDG,
JANUARY 24, 1980
226-7928 IN DETROIT.
JOIN THE _
NEW__

COLLEGE GRADS
WANTED FOR
INTERNATIONAL
PROJECTS.

a

AGRICULTURE
BUSINESS
EDUCAT ION
ENGINEERING
FRENCH
HOME ECON.
LIBERAL ARTS
MATH
NURSING
THE SCIENCES

Welcome
Happy Hour
Mon.-Thur. 4-
Friday 4-7
The Count and C
welcome all stud

s
'I

Back
-6
harley
lents.

s4

South University and Church " 668-8411

i1

Solve Your Summer Job Worries Now!
SUMMER INTERN PROGRAM
IN JEWISH
COMMUNAL SERVICE
JUNE 9, thorough AUGUST 8, 1980
>nsored by the Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Chicago,

Aw EI I Spo

Spo

I

r

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan