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January 22, 1980 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-01-22

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Page 6-Tuesday, January 22, 1980-The Michigan Daily
Deserting troops force Soviets
to increase Afghanistan forces

(Continued from Page 3)
THE AIRLIFT coincides with reports
from Afghan rebel sources and Asian
and Western diplomats in Islamabad
that Afghan army troops are deserting
by the thousands.
"It's reliable information," said -a
Western diplomat in Pakistan.
Two Afghan insurgent groups with
spokesmen in Pakistan claimed late
last week that 4,000 Afghan -soldiers
from an army division based at Nahrin,
in Baghlan province 120 miles north of
Kabul, defected to the rebel side with
their arms.
Diplomatic sources say there have
been numerous similar reports.
"WHAT'S HAPPENING is that the
Afghan army is suffering such rapid

desertions that the Soviets are reaching
the point where there will be no in=
digenous forces to rely on," said one
Western diplomat.
The desertion reports cannot be in-
dependently verified, although it was
clear even before the Soviet interven-
tion that many soldiers were aban-
doning the government army.
State Department spokesman Hod-
ding Carter said the latest intelligence
indicated severe winter weather and
rebel attacks had kept the Soviets from
reaching isolated garrisons of the
Afghan army in northeastern
Afghanistan, where the heaviest rebel
resistance is reported.
ELSEWHERE, THE Saudi gover-

MINORITY GRDUATE SCHOOL S
CAREER CONFERENCE
TUESDAY, JANUARY 22, 1980
10a.m.-5 p.m.
MICHIGAN LEAGUE-
Come and meet representatives from 100 business, industry
and government organizations,. 10 public school districts and 30
graduate schools.

nment said it considered the alleged
reinforcement of Soviet and Cuban
military presence in its neighbor South
Yemen "as grave a threat as the Soviet
invasion of Afghanistan," according to
the sources.
Saudi leaders believe the Kremlin
now is bent on consolidating its grip on
South Yemen as part of a plan to encir-
cle the Persian Gulf oil resources and
vital shipping lanes, the sources added.
The Saudis view the moves so alar-
ming that Saudi Arabia, the world's
largest oil-exporting nation, might soon
put its entire 44,500-strong armed for-
ces on alert, the sources said.
THE DIPLOMATIC sources said the
Saudi government of King Khaled
relayed its warning to both Washington
and London.
The United States and Britain were
told the Russian and Cuban reinfor-
cements were flown to South Yemeni
capital of Aden from Ethiopia, the
Kremlin's major ally in the Horn of
Africa, the sources said.
South Yemen, on the Indian Ocean,
and Ethiopia, in easternmost Africa,
jointly control the strait that forms the
entrance to the Red Sea. This is the
shortest route for crude oil shipments
from the Persian Gulf to the West.
The gulf accounts for one-third of the
world's oil supplies. The United States
relies on Saudi Arabia's production of
9.5 million barrels a day to meet about
20 per cent of total American oil impor-
ts.

(Sponsored by Career Planning and Placement,
Office of Student Services)

ALUMNI ARE WELCOME

ASK THEM WHYI

AP Photo

AFGHAN GUERRILLAS guard an Afghan government officer and a captured Soviet truck in Zabol, near the Iranian
border. 0

President's State of the Union address:
No '80 tax cut unless economy worsens

From AP and UPI
WASHINGTON-President Carter's
State of the Union message to Congress
released yesterday revealed he plans
no tax cuts this year-although he may
change his mind if the economy wor-
sens-and will propose few new
domestic programs for 1980.

"My 1981 budget proposes no tax
cuts. As long as double digit inflation
continues and there is no sign of a
recession, our top budgetary priority
must be reduction of the deficit," Car-
ter said.
Carter also said he wants prompt ac-
tion to deal with the crises in the Middle

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Ask VISTA volunteers why they work a year with residents of
Chicago's Westside to set up cOmmllunlrity greenhouses. They'll
probably say they're concerned for America's poor, they want to
be involved in social change and hell) people learn to be
advocates for resourses and services they need. Ask them:
PLACEMENT OFFICE
INTERVIEWS JANUARY 22-23, 1 980
INFORMLAT1N' JANDARY 22,23,24,a 19TA
(313) 226-7928 IN DETROIT.

Introductoy Discussions
0#7 the Rahe'/i faith
Every Wed. and Thurs. thru January 31
SBs'i fCenter, 512 Packard St.
7:30 P.M.

East, including enactment of a military
and economic aid package for Pakistan
which is threatened by the Soviet
military action in Afghanistan.
THE PRESIDENT- will deliver a
shorter version of the constitutionally
required annual message in a televised
personal appearance to a joint session
of Congress tomorrow night.
In a 75-page written message, Carter
pointed to Soviet intervention in
Afghanistan as posing a threat "to the
entire subcontinent of Asia," and
declared:
"We must pay whatever price is
required to remain the strongest nation
in the world."
WHILE DECRYING the continued
holding of U.S. hostages in Iran, Carter
Your apaertment
crmpd

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Taste the pride ofCanada.

said his government would welcome "a
new and mutually beneficial relation
ship" with Iran once the prisoners were
freed.
"We have no basic quarrel with the
nation, the revolution or the people of
Iran," Carter said in what amounted
to an oblique suggestion that the two
countries make a fresh start in
assessing their relations.
He also reiterated his support for
eventual ratifiction of the Strategic
Arms Limitation Treaty (SALT IDwith
the Soviets, calling it "the single most
important bilateral accord of th4
decade."
IN THE REALM of domestic policy,
Carter promised a "responsible,
restrained budget" and said he would
"be limitin fn'iajor new proposals to
a critical -few," iri part because
Congress plans a foreshortened election
year session.
But the president suggested that ac-
tion on his new initiatives, coupled with
enactment of past proposals, "can help.
to ensure stable prices and economicO
growth, a return to energy security, an
efficient, responsive government."
Terming inflation "our most serious
economic problem," the president said
he saw "hope for a gradual reduction in
the inflation rate" through public and
private restraint and longer-term effor-
ts to deal with the underlying causes.
FOR THE MOST part, the message
pushed for enactment of programs he
proposed previously-such as the win-
dfall oil profits tax and legislation
protecting Alaska lands, which he called
his "highest environmental priority"
for 1980.
Carter said his major new programs
would be limited to:
* A youth employment plan designed
to put 500,000 more young people to
work.
*New general revenue-sharing
legislation for cities and states:
* A new program to help utilitie .
convert from oil to coal.
* Reorganization of the Nuclear
Regulatory Commission and nuclear
safety proposals.
* Approval of a standby gasoline
rationing plan, authorized by
legislation already passed by Congress.
* Initiatives to respond to the Soviet
invasion of Afghanistan.

Jill

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Read the
Daily Classifleds
for the latest 'For Rent' info.
SKIERS
* Group Accommodaftions (20 or
more) at Camp Sea-Gull in the w
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CALL 313-661-0060

U-M Department Theatre and Drama
AUDITIONS
January 25 - 27
FOR
The Guest Artist Series production of
e Re1apse
by Sir John VanBrugh
Directed by Dominic Cermele
Opens April16
The Showcase Production of

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