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May 13, 1976 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-05-13

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Thursday, May 13, 1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

fhursday, May 13, 1976 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Five

TU claims partial
victory in court
(Continued from Page 3) One of the defendants, Mar-
IN EARLIER court action this rianne Koch, said after the trial,
week tenants were granted a "I'm happy. It's good for us
total of more than $4000 in back and good for other tenants."
rent and damages suffered in The lawyer representing the
another Reliable Realty house tenants, R i c h a r d Ginsberg,
at 1224 Prospect. made a motion for a mistrial
Upon hearing yesterday's ver- and claimed there were grounds
dict, Epstein's lawyer, William for an appeal.
Raymer told TU members that BOLSTERED by its victory
his client was "willing to settle against Trony Associates last
(with all TU members) on month, the student-run organi-
terms similar to today's." TU ation has boosted its member-
said- they would not agree to ship to over 300.
such an offer. The TU filed for a restrain-
Testimony by tenants yester- ing order last Friday to prevent
day maintained that there were Epstein from signing any new
discrepancies between the lease leases unles they are negotiated
copies they signed and the with the TU.
copies Epstein signed and re- According to the T e n a n t s
tained, and that the building Union, any new leases signed
was rented under false pre- before a collective bargaining
tenses, and was "plain uncom- agreement c a n be reached
fortable" and "disconcerting" to would be in violation of an
live in. agreement in which Epstein rec-
ALTHOUGH the house was in- ognized the union as the sole
spected in November, 1975, the bargaining a g e n t for new
tenants claimed, it still had renters.
cracked walls, slanted floors, Negotiations between the two
shoddy bathrooms, poor heating, groups broke off last month over
drafts, and a leaky basement. the isue of rent control.
'Incompetent' Patty
will stand trial alone

76 race
evokes
yawns
(Continued from Page 3)
feeling during informal campus
discussions "that there's not
m u c h confidence that the
real issues come out in the
election process."
However, the campaign rhet-
oric of the primaries apparently
isn't entirely unheard by college
students.
"I suspect that the person who
becomes president could have a
decided effect on the philosophy
that runs the country, whether
its liberal or conservative," says
Richard Langlois, 24, a Stanford
graduate student in engineering-
economic systems.
MELVYN KLEIN, director of
activities at Penn State, says:
"Students are more interested in
the local government situation
where they are actually living,
I would anticipate that as we
get closer to the national con-
ventions and the election that
there will be increased political
activity."
Holly Warren, 1.8, a physical
sciences major at Berkeley, dis-
agrees.
'Most students are into es-
caping and being individuals
and not having anything to do
with politics," she says. "I'm
going into science. I'd rather
contribute through that than
through voting."
Timber!.
Comi soon.
Theak a onRoadLoggng Company

UNIVERSITY STAYS SILENT:
GEO demands mount

(Continued from Page 3)
inittee would be financially fea-
sible.
After numerous attempts by
the union team to elicit a reac-
tion from the University nego-
tiators, GEO member Rudy
Rosales broke in, "If you're
such racists, okay, let's talk
about it here. But all I see is
defensiveness or silence!"
The University bargainers, ac-
cording to Forsyth, want to col-
laborate with other administra-

tors and each other in drawing
up a counterproposal before at-
tempting to debate the issues.
However, he stated after the
meeting, "It's clear to me if
those are their (GEO's) (stead-
fast) proposals then we're not
going to have a contract."
If a settlement is not reached
by CEO's October 5 contract
deadline, the University faces
the possibility of a large-scale
GSA walkout which could crip-
ple University proceedings.

. .... ... ...

1214 s. university
Theatre Phone 668-6416
TONIGHT AT 7 & 9
OPEN 6:45
"An exhilaratinq thriller"
--N.Y. Times

-1

uP~r
STARTS
TOMORROW!
JAWS with Claws!

There's
no hody
in the
family
plot.

(Continued from Page 3)
He cited Hearst's commitment
for at least 90 days of diagnostic
tests, the fact that her attorneys
have filed no pre-trial motions,
and the argument that "diver-
gent defenses" might eventually
require severance anyway.
"There's really nothing for the
court to rule on," Brandler said,
accepting the prosecution's thes-
is that the trials are automatic-
ally severed.
ATTORNEY Leonard Wein-
glass, representing Emily Har-
ris, protestedr theseverance,
calling it an arbitrary decision
by the district attorney that
would cost the county an addi-
tional $100,000.
"There is no overriding rea-
son to rush this case to trial,"
be stid.
Hearst and the Harrises stud-
iously ignored each other at
their first confrontation since
their arrest last September.
They were to have met at an
earlierwhearinghat which the
Harrises entered pleas of not
guilty to the charges, but Hearst
suffereda collapsed lung the
day before and was rushed to a
hospital.
THE THREE face charges of
assault with a deadly weapon
and kidnaping in a May 1974
alleged crime spree that began
when the Harrises were accused
of shoplifting in an Inglewood
sporting goods store.
Ms. Harris, 29, her face pale
and pinched from confinement
in a windowless cell, stared at
Hearst at one point in court
yesterday. Hearst did not look
back.
The 22-year-old Hearst glanced
around the courtroom, chatted
MONEY MARKETS
NEW YORK (/') - The
American Life Insurance Assn.
Companies says life insurance
firms supplied an estimated
$17.4 billion to U. S. money and
capital markets in 1975.
It says this was up from $14.9
billion in 1974.
9E0011 ".11 4e

with her attorney but signaled
no reaction to the Harrises,
once her fugitive traveling com-
panions as -well as her alleged
kidnapers.
Brandler indicated that yes-
terday's hearing might consti-
tute the last meeting for Hearst
and the Harrises in the bullet-
proof courtroom w h e r e they
were to have been tried to-
gether.

THE PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM presents
RODDY McDO WALL VINCENT PRICE
CORAL BROWNE IN
MAY 11-16 in POWER CENTER
Tickets at PTP Ticket Office, Mendelssohn Theatre
OTickets at PTP Ticket Office,
Mendelssohn Theatre Lobby
Mixed League Bowling
now forming-sign up at Union Lanes
INDIVIDUALS OR TEAMS
M-PIN BOWLING all summer
WIN A FREE GAME at the Union-
the swingiest
- - -- - - - --- ------ ---
TONIGHT-THE BEATLES
HELP
(Richard Lester, 1965)
Ringo has a ring that has a jewel that an Indian cult religion
needstto perform human sacrifices and that's just the beginning
of one of theozaniest plots to hit he screen. Richard Lester keeps
justthe rghtamount of control over the chaos.OGreat tunes
by theBeahis.
AUD. A ANGELL-7 & 10:30
A HARD DAY'S NIGHT
(Richard Lester, 19641
Ostensibly a look at a typical Beatle day, A Hard Day's Night
made Lester an importantdirector and drew favorable comparis-
ons with the Marx brothers. The breakneck pace. zingy one-
liners and fine songs make this a very quick 90 minutes. Is this
film really 12 years old?!
AUD. A-8:45 only
$1.25 single or $2.00 double feature

CHRISTOPHER ANDREW RICHARD
GEORGE PRIME JAECKEL
g ', sreen aslseed e AZWLsY' am G dilm
I'C A (M1St 1 t 1U11N 5 TODD-AO 35 - COLOR by Movie Lab L ]
603 east liberty LAST TIMES TONIGHT
"THE OTHER SIDE OF
MICHIGAN THE MOUNTAIN"
( PG)
PhoTheatre P 6s9' Shtowstof7&9, Ooen 6:45
STARTS TOMORROW-
UNFORGETTABLE HUMAN DRAMA
Children bekieve
inmimrcles
Grandfa ters
A Ctkolubiat(2resprat atoa P
TAA~i £~ce 0L*WtOA&lzi.~

THE EXORCIST
Direced b6WILLIAM FRIEDKIN
From Water Bros.
231 south state SHOWTIMES
MonTues.,Thurs., Fri., 7 & 9
" Sot., Sun., Wed., 1-3-5-7-9
Pusses, guest night, Barain day
suspended for this entogement.

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