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August 14, 1976 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-08-14

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Page Four

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, August 14, 197

S. Africa arrests 50 black leaders

JOIHANNEStURG, S o u t h
Africa AP) - Security police
have arrested at least 50 black
leaders in a nationwide crack-
down on black nationalist
groups susnected of fomenting
South Africa's bloody racial
npheavals, sources said yester-
day.
Only a few new outbreaks of
violence were reported follow-
ing two days of riots in black
townshins outside Cape Town
in which at least 79 blacks were
killed and some 100 injured.
SOUTH, AFRICA'S commis-

sioner of police, Gen. Gert
Prinsloo, confirmed in Pre-
toria that a number of blacks
were being held under the re-
cently enacted Internal Security
Act but declined to give de-
tails.
The act provides for deten-
tion without trial of those ar-
rested. Police in Port Eliza-
beth, 550 miles south of here,
confirmed one arrest, that of,
Barney Pityana, general secre-
tarv of the Black South African
Students Association.
Black sources said most of
those arrested were from

around Johannesburg, and oth-
ers were from Cape Town, King
William's Town, Grahams-
town, Durban and Shepstone.
ALONG WITH the arrests, po-
lice were on alert throughout
the country. Police Brig. Jan
Visser flew to Cape Town with
130 reinforcements and said,
"I have just been sent down
to put a stop to the rioting here
and that is just what I am go-
ing to do."
At the same time, Minister of
Police James Kruger said
South Africa's whites, with 17
per cent of the 25 million popu-
lation, must not lash back at
the black disturbances. He said
the government would move
quickly to give blacks a bet-
ter deal under the apartheid
policy of segregation and sepa-
rate development of the races.
"W will have to give the,
black man so many things ba-
sic to him and his life that he
will believe in us and in sepa-
rate development, so the black
man can say, "If this is what
I get from this policy and these
hands, then I am satisfied,"';

Kruger told a meeting of the
ruling National Party in Dur-
ban.
HE WARNED black nation-
alist groups against fomenting
disturbances.
"The black power movement
will bump its head in a bloody
way in this country if it seeks
confrontation," Kruger said.
"We are ready, we are able."
Most of the reported arrests
involved leaders of black na-
tionalist groups. One was Mrs.
Winnie Mandela, 42, wife of
imprisoned black nationalist
Nelson Mandela and a member
of the Black Parents Associa-
tion in Soweto, the black town-
shin near Johannesburg where
476 died in riots in June.
NELSON MANDELA is lead-
er of the banned African Na-
tional Congress (ANC) and is
regarded by many black mili-
tants as the true leader of
South Africa's 18 million blacks.
He was sentenced to life in
prison in 1964 for conspiring to
overthrow the government.
Kruger said last week the
ANC may be partly responsi-

ble for the upheavals in black
townships across South Africa
in recent weeks.
The Soweto riots developed
out of demonstrations against
the use of Afrikaans language
in school. The studjents felt the
language was impractical and
also a symbol of white oppres-
sion. The government rescind-
ed its order on Afrikaans, and
demonstrators recently have
demanded that persons arrested
earlier be freed.
T H E C H A N T I N G
of black power songs and slo-
gans has given the demonstra-
tions a definite antigovernment
flavor.
The black sources said 'the
Rev. Mangaliso Mkatswa, sec-
retary of the Roman Catholic
Bishops' Conference, was ar-
rested, along with Dan Mok-
wen, a member of the confer-
ence staff. Others reported ar-
rested were Harrison Motlana,
a Soweto leader; Samson Ndou,
a former ANC leader, and Leo-
nardo ,Appies, a student leader
in Cape Town.

the ann, arbor film cooperative
-TONIGHT-
SPECIAL UNSCHEDULED SHOWING of
MEL bROOKS
BLAZ I NG SADDLES ML5 4
Perhaps tiar last word in Western perodies A BaceSrilrod
worker itleavss Little)Is appointed sheriff at alt-white and
bigoted Rockridge in this uproarious, contagious, outrageous and
oometimoes vulgar comedy. See Mel as the terroritorial governor
and an Indian chief. Also Gene wilder, Alex Karras, Madeline
Kahn. English without subtitles.
7, 8:45 & 10:30 Admission $1.25
THIS MONDAY NIGHT-AUGUST 16
KEN RUSSELL'S (1970)
WOMEN IN LOVE
An a ripi a of flmmaking technique and a masterfetul
.:<lpttio n"f the D. H. Lawrence novel. Glenda Jackson won an
Ac:,deawy Awrd fr Best Actrest. "It is difficult to recall an-
other filml, hat so sccessfully teereated the past with a depth
thot rings t< life every album snaphot we have seen of the
a t lir eed.Jennie inden.
7 & 9:15 AUD. A ANGELL HALL
231 "ot state -2ND H IT WEEK!
SHOWS TODAY & TOMORROW
AT 1-3-5-7 9
OPEN 12:45,.
DARING, DANGEROUS &
DOWNRIGHT DEE-LIGHTFUL
SILLY DEE WILLIAMS JAMES EARL JONES
RICHARD hoO
PRYOR
I UNIVERSAL PICTURE TCHKICLOR ' MOTORIKINeS

Syria restricts travel from Lebanon

(Continued from Page 3) w
said they have chosen to die
rather than surrender."
JEAN HOEFLIGER, head of
the International .Red Cross
here, said Christian militiamen
were beginning to clean up
bodies strewn among the hovels
at Tal Zaatar, using bulldozers
to shove them around.
A spokesman for the Pales-
tine Liberation Organization
(PtO) said in Geneva, Switzer-
land, yesterday hewas told by
PLO. officials in Beirut that
macv male civilians at Tal Zaa-
tar "were just taken to the side
and shot" by Christian troops.
Ie said officers from the Syrian
intervention force, which has
fought aganist the leftists and
Palestinians in the past, helped
direct the final assault on Tal
Zaatar.

A PLO official here estimated
that 3,000 persons were killed
during the seven-week siege,
about 300 on the last day.
RED CROSS sources said
they could not confirm the
death toll, but one said, "There
are bodies all over the place."
Jumblatt said at a news con-
ference that the fall of Tal Zaa-
tar "was a setback that we will
have to survive with added de-
termination to fight on."
"We turn to the Arab powers,
demanding not less' than $10
million to face the requirements
of the coming stage of fighting,
which will never. cease until
Syrian intervention forces have
withdrawn from Lebanon," he
said.
JUMBLATT'S appeal was un-
likely to draw much new aid.
Such radical Arab regimes as

those in Libya and Iraq already
are financing the leftist side. Oil
money from the Persian Gulf is
controlled largely by conserva-
tive royalty that fears leftist
victory even more than Chris-
tian dominance over Moslems.
Fighting on other fronts slack-
ened during the day yesterday
after a night of deadly shelling
by both sides. Hospitals and se-
curity officials who try to main-
tain a count estimated 230 were
killed and 280 wounded in the
latest 24-hour period.
There was widespread specu-
lation that the fall of Tal Zaa-
tar, though deepening the bitter-
ness, nevertheless could help
pave the way to a new cease-
fire. Christian determination to
clear mostly Christian east Bei-
rut of the Moslem-Palestinian
presence had been a major ob-
stacle to permanent truce.

NOW SHOWING
Shows Tuday & Tomorrow
at 1-3-5-7-9 Open 12:45
"PRUE LUNACY...
UPROARIOUSLY
FUNNY!"-Time
lEI0
,Mel Brooks
.. ceAno otrv-
. ,b ,o, In Colr--ine ,

1a0 waSHoNAw c r 4P44-782
ENDS TUESDAY
Sho s Today & Tomorrow
at 1-3-5-7:00
Open 12:45
"THE APPLE
DUMPLING GANG"

Francois Ford,Coppola's 1974
THE CONVERSATION
Coppola has had the good fortune to capifalize on growing public interest
in organized crime (as in the Godfather) and, more recently, in wiretap-
ping as in this compelling look at an expert wiretapper who becomes per-
sonally caught up in the work he is doing. Gene Hackman gives a great
performance as the secretive master and unwitting servant to his craft.
One of the best American films of the last five years and certainly one of
the most suspenseful climaxes that ends with the lonely wail of a saxophone.
SUN.: D. W. Griffith's BROKEN BLOSSOMS-I(FREE at 8)
A Look for our fall schedule coming soon
TONIGHT AT OLD ARCH. AUD.
CINEMA GUILD 7:30 & 9:30 Admission $1.25
Dorothy Arzner's 1929
THE WILD PARTY
Directed by one of the few practicing female Hollywood directors, Dorothy
Arzner (whose later films reflect a definite "feminist ideology"); THE
WILD PARTY is interesting as one of the first Hollywood talkies-in fact,
Clara Bow, silent screen siren of the time, makes her talking debut, in this
film. Plot-wise, THE WILD PARTY is about a group of rowdy, unconven-
tional women and their conflicts with the conservative majority of Winston's
College for Women. Starring Clara Bow, Frederick March, Shirley- O'Hara,
4 and Jack Oakie.
TONIGHT AT ANGELL HALL AUD. A
CINEMA I 7:30 &9:00OP.M. Aarm. $1.25

6'3' s 4iert 4TH HIT WEEK!
TODAY & TOMORROW AT
neon Phoe 69670 1 -3-5-7-9 OPEN 12:45
"Inspired lunacy. Funny without mercy."-
Time. "The season's funniest"-Newsday

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