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August 13, 1976 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-08-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

l'oe woI lru L icoLitbAlNL 1AItv

Page T wo

TH MICIA Dm-aiAILY

F-irday, ugust 1:3,m1

GOP platform leans to Ford

('snnUs Ic::, t'sgl)
cessfully so far.
Burch's reaction to Reed's
statement was that the Ford list
of vice presidential possibili-
ties "is quite long and it covers
the entire Republican spec-
trum."
Ford's chances of picking up
Mississippi's 30 delegate votes
were enhanced when Reed an-
nounced he could not support
Reagan after the former Cali-
fornia governor said he would
name Sen. Richard Schweiker,
a liberal, as his running mate.
BUT REED'S new statement
noted that Ford's list of vice
presidential possibilities was
r e p o r t e d to include Sens.
Charles Percy of Illinois, Low-
ell Weicker of Connecticut,
Mark Itatfield of Oregon and
Edward Brooke of Massachu-
setts. Reed said they all "more
often vote with the Democrats
than their own party."

At the same time, both Ford
and Reagan delegate counters
were watching for any changes
resulting from Buckley's dec-
laration that he is considering
getting into the presidential
race.
"I have not found much senti-
ment in any area for Mr. Buck-
ley," Sears said.
Burch also said he had
heard of no changes.
Nonetheless, preconvention
speculation focused on the pos-
sible effect Buckley's entry
into the race would have on the
fortunes of Ford and Reagan.
BUCKLEY, campaigning for
re-election in New York, was
under heavy pressure to stop
toying with the idea of becom-
ing a candidate for the presi-
dential nomination. Most of the
heat was coming from New
York delegates.
The full platform committee,
where Ford supporters are be-

lieved to hold a slight advan-
tage, was debating the planks
drafted by various subcommit-
tees. Tlpe subcommittees ar-
gued far into the night on
Wednesday.
A fight was expected over
the Equal Rights Amendment.
The draft plank supports efforts
to ensure equality for women
but does not mention or endorse
the amendment. F e m i n i s t
groups were campaigning to
have an endorsement of the
amendment included in the plat-
form. Ford supports the amend-
ment; Reagan opposes it.
DURING THE early debate
before the full committee, Rea-
gan supporters defeated an at-
tempt to water down a plank
putting the Republicans on re-
cord in opposition to all forms
of gun control. Reagan opposes
all proposals for registration of
firearms. Ford, while general-
ly opposed to gun control, has
Milliken
LANSING (UPI) - Gov. Wil-
liam Milliken signed into law
much of the fiscal 1976-77 state
b u d g e t yesterday, including
funding for school aid, the op-
eration of state colleges and
universities, the various depart-
ments of state government and
construction projects.
The $259.3 million Department
of Education budget, a slight
increase over 1975-76 spending,

supported measures to outlaw
cheap handguns, so-called "Sat-
urday Night Specials."
Some of the most heated de-
bate during the late-night ses-
sions on Wednesday was before
the foreign policy subcommittee
w h e r e Reagan supporters
fought for approval of planks
that would reflect the Califor-
nian's campagin positions on
the Panama Canal and detente.
But the Ford backers prevail-
ed by narrow margins.
Rather than commit negotia-
tors to retaining U. S. sove-
reignty over the Panama Ca-
nal, the subcommittee approv-
ed a plank saying negotiators
should not give up rights over
any area that is "necessary for
the protection and security of
the United States and the entire
Western Hemisphere."
IT WAS ON the foreign policy
planks that Ford strategists
felt they had to engage in a test

of strength with the Reagan
forces rather than commit the
party to positions contradicting
the policies pursued by Ford
and Secretary of State Henry
Kissinger. The subcommittee
votes gave Ford a narrow edge
in the first major convention
confrontation.
On domestic issues such as
abortion and school busing, the
Ford and Reagan positions
were close enough. in principle
that the President's managers
felt he had plenty of room for
agreement.
The platform committee's
deadline to complete drafting
the GOP positions on foreign
and domestic issues is noon
today. Convention managers
said the platform had to be
complete by then so the docu-
ment could be printed and
ready for distribution to dele-
gates when they arrive on
Sunday.

Tal Zaatar falls to
Christian soldiers

signs new budget
including $220,000 for a bilingual retirement system. Also axed
education resource center to from the bill were provisions to
help local school implement bi- distribute school aid revenues
lingual teaching programs. in excess of the $758 million an-
ticipated, to provide $2.8 million
Using his line-item veto power, in reimbursements to school dis-
however, the governor struck tricts with a greater than aver-
from the education bill several age enrollment decline and
sections including a $34.6 mil- $600,000 for districts participat-
lion appropriation to restore ing with intermediate districts
contingency reserves for the De- in cooperative educational pro-
troit public school employees' gramming.

wontinued fromh ': e 1)
fend Tal Zaatar to the bitter
end. '
The chief Arab League me-
diator, lassan Sabri Kholi,
said recently that the battle for
Tal Zantar was the main stum-
bling block to a cease-fire in
the Lebanese conflict, in which
Moslem leftists have been
seeking a greater share of po-
litical and economic power from
the Christians. The Palestin-
ians ined the fighting in an
effort to maintain their semi-
autonomy from the Christian-
dominated Lebanese govern-
ment.
The flight of emaciated, weep-
ing civilians was arranged by
the Tnternational Red Cross and
Palestinian civilian leaders
from within the camp, who ne-
gotiated directly with Christian
militia officers leading the
siege.
THE RADIO station of Pierre
Gemavel's right - wing Chris-
tian Phalange party claimed the
evacuation was secretly agreed
to by Palestinian security chief

Abu Hassan in a Wednesday
night meeting with Gemayel's
nephew Alexandre.
Estimates of the number of
people inside the devastated
hovels of Tal Zaatar had rang-
ed as high as 30,000, including
Lebanese Moslems, but this
was never certain because resi-
dents filtered out over the
months of fighting. A nurse
evacuated from the camp last
week said as many as 2,000
may have been killed during the
siege.
NO GUERRILLA fighters
were seen among those who
fled the camp yesterday, and
Palestinian spokesmen claim-
ed a small number were still
standing firm.
"The ammunition ran out.
Rocket launchers were there,
but without rockets. We ran
out of water, out of food, out of
everything," said the wrinkle-
faced Palestinian refugee, Ab-
d'illah Youssif Joumah, as he
wiped away tears with his
white kaffieh, the Arab head-
dress.

Television viewing tonight

6:00 2 7 111 3 NEWS
9 I DREAM OF JEANNIE
20 CISCO KID-Western
30 ZOOM-Children
50 BRADY BUNCH-Comedy
in I SPY
6:30 4 13 NBC NEWS
Chancellor/Brinkley
9 NEWSDAY
11 CBS NEWS-W. Cronkite
20 DANIEL BOONE
30 HODGEPODGE LODGE
50 I LOVE LUCY-Comedy
7:00 2 CBS NEWS-W. Cronkite
4 BOWLING FOR DOLLARS
7 ABC NEWS-H. Reasoner
9 ANDY GRIFFITH-Comedy
11 FAMILY AFFAIR-Comedy
13 iHOGAN'S HEROES
30 ROBERT MacNEIL REPORT
50 FAMILY AFFAIR-Comedy
56 OFF THE RECORD
62 SPEAKING OF SPORTS
7:30 2 WILD, WILD WORLD
OF ANIMALS
4 HOLLYWOOD SQUARES
7 LET'S MAKE A DEAL
9 ROOM 222-Comedy-Drama
11 BOBBY VINTON-Variety
13 ADAM-12-Crime-Drama
20 STUMP THE STARS
30 LOWELL THOMAS

REMEMBERS-Documentary
50 HOGAN'S HEROES
56 ROBERT MacNEIL REPORT
62 NEWS
7:45 62 TEEN PROFILE-Discussion
8:00 2 JACK VAN IMPE CRUSADE
4 AMERICAN LIFE STYLE
7 DONNY & MARIE-Variety
9 MONTY PYTHON
11 DON ADAMS'
SCREEN TEST
13 PILOT-Comedy
"For Better or Worse"
20 IT TAKES A THIEF
30 56 WASHINGTON WEEK
IN REVIEW
50 MERV GRIFFIN
62 DETROIT CRIME ALERT
8:05 62 MOVIE-Adventure (bw)
"Rock Island Trait"
8:30 4 11 BASEBALL
Detroit vs. Kansas City
9 BILLY LIAR-Comedy
13 PILOT-Comedy
"Phillip & Rarbara"
30556 WALL STREET WEEK
9:00 2 MOVIE-Crime-Drama
"Confessions of a Police Captain"
7 MOVIE-Crime-Drama
"Hard Contract"
9 SUNSHINE HOUR-Variety
13 PILOT-Comedy

Summer Supper
at Bicycle Jim's
a' Ahead
and Beyond
GB~yc~e Delicious-
Upper Level not Upper Crust
BICYCLE JIM'S
Corner S. University and S. Forest

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FREE WE
50c Discount on Adn
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HOURS: Fri. & Sat. 8 p.m.-2
WEEKLY HOURS: 9 p.m.-
516 E. Liberty

iEELIN
ission
2 a.m.
2 n.m.
994-5350

1
1

"Your Place or Mine'
20 700 CLUB--Religion
30 56 U.S.A.: PEOPLE
AND POLITICS
50 MOVIE-Drama (bw)
"Bright Leaf"
9:30 13 ROCKFORD FILES
10:00 9 SPORTS SCENE
30 MASTERPIECE THEATRE
57 MOVIE-Drama (bw)
"Double Suicide"
62 PTL CLUB-Relgion
10:30 9 GRAND OLD COUNTRY
20 HAPPY HUNTERS
11:00 2 4 711 13 NEWS
9 CBC NEWS-Lloyd Robertson
20 DON KIRSHNER'S
ROCK CONCERT
50 BEST OF GROUCHO
56 AMERICAN INDIAN
ARTISTS
11:20 9 NIGHTBEAT
11:30 2 MARY HARTMAN,
MARY HARTMAN-Serial
Mary returns from a
clandestine rendezvous
with the sergeant; Foley
breaks the news to Cathy.
4 13 JOHNNY CARSON
7 PGA CHAMPIONSHIP
it MOVIE-Comedy (bw)
"Sailor Beware"
50 MOVIE-Comedy (bw)
"You'll Find Out"
56 ABC NEWS-H. Reasoner
11:45 2 ROOKIES-Crime-Drama
11:50 9 WILD WILD WEST
12:00 2 MOVIE-Comedy (bw)
62 REV. DAVID EPLEY
12:30 62 NEWS
12:50 9 MOVIE-Musical
"The Dream Maker"
12:55 7 MOVIE-Science Fiction
"Thin Air"
1:00 4 13 MIDNIGHT SPECIAL
1:40 11 DON KIRSHNER'S
ROCK CONCERT
2:10 2 CAPUTO-Discussion
2:30 4 13 NEWS
2:55 7 NEWS
3:10 11 NEWS
3:40 2 NEWS
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVI, No. 67-S
Friday, August 13, 1926
a edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. NeWs
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published d a i t y Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynari Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscriptlin
rates: 012 sept. thru April (2 semes-
ters); $13 by mail outside Aol
Arbor.
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Susbcrption races: $0.50 In Ann
Arbor; $251 by mouesde Ani
Arbor.

Q~E; CG2G2G

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