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May 13, 1976 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1976-05-13

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Page Two.,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, May 13, 1976

SEEK MORE INFORMATION: Why did Church win?
(continued from Page 1) igan, as well as the nomination
Church coordinator Don Geis and the November election.
said much the same thing. Udall also was in Detroit. The

rContinued from Page 1)
ping together of DNA strands
from two completely different
organisms and then altering
the genetic characteristics of
the host organism as the DNA
replicates.
Contrary to popular opinion,
much of the recombinant DNA
research considered to be of
zero or low risk has been per-
formed and will continue to be
performed,
"Low risk" research requires
a minimum of safety precau-
tions and "zero risk" signifies
that "risks (have been) reduc-
ed to the same level as daily
activities" according to panel
member Frederick Neidhardt,
Chairman of the University
Microbiology Department.
It is moderate and high risk
research and their contain.
ment that have generated the
controversy. Some research
has been banned, but most,
temporarily suspended, awaits
the finalized National Institutes

of Health (NIH) safety guide-
lines, expected in about a
month, according to Joseph
Perpich, Associate Director
for Programming and Planning
at the NIH.
The University has been
crawling towards approval of
research here. Committee B,
an 11-member faculty group as-
signed to explore the moral
and ethical implications of the
research, took the first steps
by recommending that the Uni-
versity proceed with the re-
search following rules slightly
more stringent than the draft
NIH guidelines.
The faculty Senate Assem-
bly took the next step last
month when it endorsed the
committee's recommendation
by an eight-to-one margin.
According to Dunn, Univer-
sity President Robben Flem-
ing "is pushing for" the Re-
gents to make their decision
next week, but Dunn doesn't

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know if they'll be ready to vote
by then.
At the forum, panelists em-
phasized that the most import-
ant benefits of the research lay
in its importance to simply un-
derstanding genetic operations.
Neidhardt stressed that "the
benefit to be acquired should
not be measured solely by pro-
ducts. The much greater bene-
fits of the research is the piece
of information - understanding
how cells work leading to the
therapeutic and diagnostic use
of this information."
Wright was clearly in a mi-
nority among the panel mem-
bers as she expressed reserva-
tions about the NI guidelines.
"T hey are not stringent
enough," she said, and went
on to ask her supportive col-
league, University Physics
Prof. Marc Ross, who was not
a panel member, to draw the
parallels between the develop-
ment of nuclear power and the
opening up of the field of re-
combinant DNA research, not-
ing the early optimistic atti-
tude toward each of the tech-
nological advances and the
changes incurred in perception
of the risks as the research
continued.
PERMANENT
WEIGHT 1LOSS
THROUGH
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"The senator traveled, he ad-
dressed the issue of agriculture
very well and with his person-
ality, his looks, he came across
well," he said.
M e a n w h i l e, Demo-
crats and Republicans seeking
votes in the next round of
presidential p r i m a r i e s
crisscrossed the country yester-
day, with much of the atten-
tion centered on Michigan
w h e r e President Ford
and Morris Udall face crucial
tests.
FORD, WHO began a series
of appearances in the Detroit
area, said he exnected to win
his home state primary of Mich-

Television viewing tonight

6:00 2 7 11 13 NEWS
9 BEVERLY HILLBILLIES
20 ULTRA MAN
50 BRADY BUNCH
02 1 SPY
6:30 4 13 NBC NEWS
--John Chanceelor
9 NEWS
isCaS NEWS -
Walter Cronkite
20 DANIEL BOONF-
Adventure
24 PARTRIDGE FAMILY-
Comedy
30 OURSTORY-Drama
50 I LOVE LUCY-Comedy
7:00 2 CBS NEWS-Walter
Cronkite
4 BOWLING FOR DOLLARS
-Game
7 ABC NEWS-Harry
Reasoner
11-BRADY BUNCH-Comedy
13 HOGAN'S HEROES-
Comedy
24 CROSS-WITS-Game
3056 BLACK PERSPECTIVE
ON THE NEWS
50 MICHIGAN STATE
LOTTERY
62 SPEAKING OF
SPORTS
7:30 2 TREASURE HUNT-Game
4DON ADAMS' SCREEN
TEST--Game
7 MATCH GAME PM
9 ROOM 222-Comedy-Drama
11 WILD KINGDOM
13 ADAM-12--Crime Drama
20 IT TAKES A THIEF-Ad-
venture
24 O'HIO LOTTERY BUCK-
EYE 1000
30 NOVA
50 HOGAN'S HEROES-
Comedy
56 EVENING EDITION WITH
MARTIN AGRONSKY
62 NEWS
8:00 2 11 WALTONS
4 13 MAC DAVIS-Variety
7 24 WELCOME BACK,
KOTTER-Comedy
9 TO BE ANNOUNCED
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TE-ST REA sATsIO

50 MERV GRIFFIN
56 DETROIT BLACK NEWS
62 STANLEY CU PPLAYOFF
8:30 7 24 BARNEY MILLER
:0 INNER CITY FREEWAY
9:00 2 11 PILOT-Drama
"Land of Hope"
4 13 MOVIE
"The Quest"'
7 24 STREETS OF SAN
FRANCISCO-Crime Drama
20 700 CLUB-Religion
30 OLYMPIAD-
Documentary
56 OPERA THEATER
"The Flying Dutchman"
9:30 50 DINAHI
10:00 2 IRONSIDE-Crime Drama
7 24 HARRY 0-Crime Drama
11 BARNABY JONES -
Crime Drama
30 BILL MOYERS'
JOURNAL
10:30 9 ALL AROUND THE
CIRCLE-Music
20 MANNA-Religion
62 PTL CLUB-Religion
11:00 2 4 7 11 13 24 NEWS
9 CBC NEWS-Lloyd Robert-
20 ALFRED HITCHCOCK--
Drama
50 BEST OF GROUCHO
Game
57 LILIAS, YOGA AND YOU
11:30 2 MARY HARTMAN,
MARY HARTMAN
Mary keeps mum about her
problems with Tom; Foley
pays Mary a visit; and Tom
approaches the coach for ad.
vire.
4 13 JOHNNY CARSON
7 24 MANNIX-Crime Drama
9NEWS
11 MOVIE
"rele Station Zebra."
20 JACK BENNY
50 MOVIE
"Deadline U.S.A."
56 ABC NEWS-Harry
Reasoner
12:00 2 MOVIE
"Ire Station Zebra"
9 MOVIE-
"Companions in Nightmare."
12:40 7 24 MAGICIAN-Drama
10:00 4 TOMORROW-Tom
Snyder
13 NEWS
1:10 11 NEWS
1:40 2 MOVIE-
"Savage Season"
1:50 7 NEWS
2:00 4 NEWS
3:10 2 OPERATION SECOND
CHANCE
3:40 2 NEWS
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Vtnlume LXXXVI. No. 7-8
Thursday, May 13, 1976
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published d a 11y Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription
rates: $12 Sepi. then April (2 semes-
tern) ;$23 by mal outside Ann
Arbor.
Summer session published Tues-
day t h rou gh Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $6 50 in Ann
Arbor; $7.30 by mai outside Ann
Arbor.
HAIRSTYLING
TO PLEASE
FOR MEN & WOMEN
DASCOLA
NaHir Stylists
Arboriand-971-9975
E. University-662-0354
E. Liberty--668-9329
Moole Vitiaae--761-2733

Arizona congressman, who fin-
ished a close second to front.
runner Jimmy Carter in Con-
necticut's primary, but trailed
badly in Nebraska, got an en-
thusiastic welcome from 250
striking rubber workers.
Udall, who has yet to win his
first primary, said Church's
first-place finish in Nebraska
showed that Carter was more
vulnerable than many people
thought.
Reagan, in Kansas City, said
he was delighted with his Ne-
braska win and didn't want to
be Ford's rinning mate. Nor,
he said, did he think Ford
would accent a place on the
Reagan ticket.

CITY NOTICE
Attention Voters from
Ward 1, Precinct 2, South Quad
Your POLLING PLACE for the May 18, 1976, Presiden-
tial Primary and the June 14, 1976, School Board Elec-
tion has been moved from South Quad to
WEST QUAD, 541 THOMPSON ST.

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