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July 22, 1976 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-07-22

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Thursdoy, July 22, 1976
Trowbridge, Pursell
court Livonia GOP

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

By GEORGE LOBSENZ
Special To The Daily
LIVO'NIA - In what resem-
bled a scaled-down version of
the current Ford-Reagan dog-
fight, electability - rather than
any single issue - was the key-
note of the second of three
scheduled debates between the
two Republican candidates for
the 2nd District congressional
seat: Ann Arbor City Council
member Ron Trowbridge (R-4th
Ward) and State Senator Carl
Pursell.
Before the small crowd of
middle-aged Republicans, both
contenders seemed to agree on
most of the issues. But each
of them took issue with his op-
ponent's overall ideological po-
sition.
IN HIS OPENING statement,
Trowbridge gave a brief auto-
biographical sketch - and
promptly launched an attack on
Pursell's record, characterizing
it as having beenbexcessively
liberal for a Republican.
Trowbridge pointed to a chart
compiled by an independent poll-
ster which rated state senators
on a scale of 1- 100 with re-
gard to their ideological stance.
"THIS . CHART indicates,"
claimed Trowbridge," that Carl
is the most liberal Republican
in the State Senate. That's why
I think I'm the stronger candi-
date."

IN A LATER interview, Trow-
bridge qualified his remarks,
saying the current mood of the
country supported his statement
that a more conservative can-
didate stood a better chance
of election.
"Look at what's happening in
the country. Carter, Reagan are
running against the establish-
ment-a big federal govern-
ment, big labor, that is the tra-
ditional role of the conservative,
running against the establish-
ment," said Trowbridge. "The
record so far seems to indicate
it is these kind of candidates-
conservatives running against
the establishment, are the ones
who are getting votes."
Pursell, in turn, blasted Trow-
bridge for isolating himself too
far to the right to be an effec-
tive candidate.
"SOME Republicans h a v e
gone so far to the right, they
no longer appeal to a broad
spectrum of the electorate and
in particular, crucial moderate
voters," maintained Pursell.
"At present, we (Republicans)
have only 18 per cent of vote
in the state," stated Pursell.
"We can't win races with this
small a percentage-we've got
to attract other voters. I don't
know if my opponent is concern-
ed with this fact but I am," he
added.

S. African
JOHANNESBURG, South Af-
rica (M-A black underground
movement seeking the over-
throw of South Africa's white
minority government apparently
survives despite the vigilance
of security police.
Whether the underground is
behind recent outbreaks of vio-
lence - including last month's
rioting in which 176 persons
were killed, is unclear.
WHITE authorities claim the
disturbances are organized, but
have not said whom they think
is responsible for the continuing
violence in the segregated black
townships around Johannesburg
and the nearby capital of Pre-
toria.
Officials say they don't know
how large the underground is or
how strong its support among
South Africa's 18 million blacks.
It is widely believed the ubi-
quitous security police have in-
filtrated most black organiza-
tions. Scores of arrests of black
militants in recent years seem
to underline this ability to keep
tabs on bothaundergroundor-
ganizations and openly anti-
government legal movements,
FEW IF any white journalists
have contact with the "real"
black underground, which does
not include such legal organiza-
tions as the Black People's Con-
vention or the all-black South
African Student Organization.
Two weeks ago, 10 blacks ap-
peared in court in Pietermaritz-
burg on charges of "terroristic

activities" and violating anti-
Communist laws.
Government p r o s e c u t ors
claimed one of the men, Joseph
Nduli, was trained in guerrilla
warefare, Communist ideology
and radio communication in
Tanzania and the.Soviet Union.
ALL 10 ARE charged with re-
cruiting blacks for guerrilla
training abroad, and could face
the death penalty if convicted.
The men are allegedly mem-
bers of the banned African Na-
tional Congress (ASC) which
went underground when the
movement was declared illegal
in 1960 after police killed 69
blacks protesting pass laws at
Sharpeville.
Nelson Mandela, leader of the

underground thrives

ANC, has been in prison on Rob-
ben Island off Cape Town since
1964, when he and other top
ANC officials were given life
sentences for sabotage and con-
spiracy to overthrow the gov-
ernment.
Security police say an un-
known number of blacks have
been smuggled out of the coun-
try via Swaziland and Mozam-
bique to Tanzanta.
Tanzanian President Julius
Nyerere allowed his country to
be used as a base for black
guerrillas in their successful
war against Portuguese rule in
Mozambique, and Nyerere now
mantains training camps for
black nationalists fighting white
rule to Rhodesia.
SECOND FUN WEEK!
DAILY at 1:00-4:00-
7:00-8:30 OPEN 12:45
I1TBIIGHSCORINGWMEM
WALT DISNEY
PROUC lnws
tocootn
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WALT DISNEY'S
"BA MBI"

Peace forces take positions in Beirut

BEIRUT, Lebanon (P) - First
elements of an Arab League
peacekeeping force moved into
position along Beirut's danger-
ous "green line" yesterday, but
a new attempt by the Interna-
tional Red Cross to evacuate
w o u n d e d from a besieged
refugee camp ended in failure.
Gunfire from Christian mili-
tiamen shattered the limited
cease-fire called at the Tal
Zaatar camp, forcing a two-man
Red Cross team to pull out of
the area and canceling a plan-
ned convoy to bring out 1001 of
the camp's 1,000 wounded Pales-
tinians.
TWO PREVIOUS attempts to
remove w o u n d e d from the
camp, which has been under at-
tack by the Christians for al- -
most a month also failed.
The Saudi Arabian convoy of
armored cars-its machine guns
covered in canvas, ran into
heavy shelling when it began
moving into the no man's land
between the Moslem and Chris-
tian sections of Beirut. But the
Saudis continued setting up po-
sitions to separate the warring
factions.
"There always are some peo-
ple who are against any sort of
settlement or agreement," said
Dr. Hassan Eabry Kholi, the
Egyptian chief mediator for the
Arab League. "After 16 months,
some incidents are to be ex-
pected in the first days."
PLANS CALL for the Arab
League forces to continue de-
ployment along the green line
separating the M o s I e m and
Christian sectors in Beirut to
end the shooting and make it
easier to move from one side of
the city to the other. They are
also to reopen the road to Bei-
rut's international airport and
the airport itself.
An official of Middle East Air-
tines, Lebanon's national air-
line, said the airport could be
operating two days after the
road is secured.
Jean Hoefliger, Swiss leader
of the Red Cross delegation
here, said after his third failure

in efforts to evacuate wounded
from Tal Zaatar that "it is im-
possible to be disappointed any
more in Lebanon."
BUT HE SAID that if another
cease-fire was called, the Red
Cross would try again.
Two Swiss members of the
Red Cross team, Dr. Pascal
Greletty and Bernard Mossaz,
advanced to within a few hun-
dred yards of the camp in a
white car carrying a large Red
Cross flag. They were to enter
the camp and determine if the
convoy could be brought in.
Hoefliger said they made
three attempts to move to the
camp gates but each time,
"there was shooting." He said

the gunfire was directed at the
camp, not at the team.
A Christian military radio
which had given orders to stop
firing reported the Red Cross
t e a m was approaching the
camp, and a voice on the radio
asked: "Are they being shot
at? I hope they are being shot
at. We don't want them to get
some wounded - we want a
mass evacuation."
Hoefliger said later that the
two men were able to get close
enough to the camp to see that
the last 7511 yards of road was
strewn with somuch debris and
wreckage that trucks could not
go through. He said a convey
could not get through without a
bulldozer to clear the way.

CHARLTONHESTON
HENRY FONDA

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