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July 21, 1976 - Image 34

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-07-21

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%age Ten

THE MCf-GAN OMLY

w
Wednesday, July 21, 1976

PueTnTEMI.GNDIY ensaJuy1 96

'U' study finds 55
m.p.h. limit 'effective'

It's a Martian revelation!

(Continued from Page 31
lowered average speeds on our
highways have not only reduced
accident rates, hut also the se-
verity of accidents when they
iMur. I support the 55 limit
because of the lives it has saved
on Michigan highways."
THE LOWERED speed limit
went into effect in March, 1974.
and it has reduced highway
casualties by as much as 31.5
per cent, hut it is apparent that
actual highway speeds have
been climbing slowly since then.
A cruise on almost any Mich igan
Interstate reveals that drivers
rarely observe the limit, and
police generally look the other
wav at speeds under 65

The reason for this, officials
say, is that police simply do
not have the resources to stop
everyone who is speeding. Be-
cause of the shortage of pice
manpower, the Highway Safety
Research Institute's .report sug-
gests a "tradeoff" - raising
the speed limit on Interstate-
quality roads, which are design-
ed for higher speeds, and re-
ducingthe limits on older, two-
lane state highways.
The best advice to drivers is
to observe all speed limits, in
the interests of their own safety.
Traffic studies are unified in
their conclusion that reduced
speeds save lives.

(Continued from Page 1)
rial.
The Red Planet, in the past,
has been stubborn in revealing
its secrets. Telescopes on Earth
reveal hardly any details. Two
Soviet attempts to land on Mars
were both unsuccessful, and
Viking Project officials were
forced to delay the spacecraft's
landing twice, w h e a photo-
graphs from orbit showed the
planned landing site and its
backup too rough to land on.
SUT ORBITAL pictures could
not discern any object smaller
than a football field, and Viking
officials feared the spacecraft
would be ruined upon landing
At a press conference in Pas-
adena shortly after the two pic-
tures were transmitted project
scientists were uniformly ex-
cited. Assistant NASA adminis-
trator Noel Hinners said: "I'm
almost speechless. I had tears
in my eyes for the first time
since I got married. It's really
an emotional experience."
LATER, Carl Sagan, the pop-
ular Cornell University astron-
omer, said the pictures show
Mars is "a very exciting place"
even in a lication chosen for its
uniform, unbroken smoothness.
"I can't help but think of this as
an epochal moment in planetary
exploration," he said.
Science - fiction author R a y

B r a d b u r y, whose "Martian
Chronicles" 26 years ago de-
picted a red planet as a beauti-
ful and dangerous frontier, said
Viking brought "the heart and
soul" of humans to another
planet. "There is life on Mars,"
said Bradbury, "and it's us."
President Ford, in a telephone
conversation with NASA admin-
istrator James Fletcher, called
the Viking landing "the realiza-
tion of a dream that is many,

maay centuries old."
Viking's many experiments,
beside the attention-grabbing
search for life, include an isa-
vestigation of Mars' weather, a
seismometer to detect 'Mars-
quakes,' and continued photeg-
raphy from the orbiter section,
which will circle the planet for
54 years.
Viking 2 is scheduled to touch
down at another region on Mars
in September.

AUGUST
GRADS!
COMMENCEMENT WILL BE
HELD ON AUG. 22, 1976.
ALL CAP & GOWN ORDERS MUST BE
PLACED BY JULY 23. LATE ORDERS ARE
SUBJECT TO AVAILABILITY & $2 LATE FEE.
RENTAL RENTAL DEPOSIT TOTAL
Bachelor $6.50 - 2.00 $8.50
Masler $7.25 5.25 2.00 $14.50
Doctor $7.50 5.50 2.00 $15.25
All Orders Must Be Prepaid IN FULL When Placed
Mon.-Fri. 9:30-5:30; Sat. 12-5; Closed Sunday

Senate extends tax credis
(Continued fromtPage 3) 0.For benefit only to persons
withholding by an emergency who do not itemize deductions,
law that froze withholding rates the standard deductions have
until Sept. 1. During the in- been increased to a minimum of
terim, Congress is expected to $1,700 for single persons and
complete action on the big tax $2,100 for couples. The maxi-
bill that includes extension of mum standard deduction is 16
the cuts. per cent of adjusted gross in-
HERE IS how the three parts come, up to $2,400 for single
of the tax cut work: persons and $2,800 for couples.
* Every taxpayer is allowed
to subtract from taxes owed . To give poor families an
$35 for himself and each of his incentive for keeping their jobi
dependents. Or, he may sub- and staying off welfare, a spe
tract 2 per cent of his first cial tax credit-which is sub
$9,000 of taxable income, up to tracted from taxes owed-is al
$180. The taxpayer may select lowed. Under this provision
the more beneficial option. This such families with children ma'
provision would be extended subtract from taxes 10 per cen
only through Dec. 1, 1977. of earned income up to $4,000

Court upholds legality of
state bottle petition drive

(Continued from Page 3)
The B o a r d of Canvassers
wanted to wait until after the
state Supreme Court made its
decision before certifying the
petitions.
But MUCC director Thomas
Washington is upset at the de-
lay in certification.
"I THINK it's most unethical
for them to operate this way,"
Washington said.
"They should have done it
(certification) last week," he
complained, adding that he felt

the Board had "screwed around
long enough."
Washington admits that the
MUCC is fighting a tough battle
in its effort to get the ban of
non-returnable containers en-
acted.
"TO SAY THAT we're the
strangers on the outside looking
in is the understatement of the
year," he remarked, explaining
that the bill's opponents have
"considerable power and unlim-
ited funds."
Washington also accused the
Board of Canvassers of "playing
games" and being influenced by
the power of the beverage man-
ufacturers, container manufac-
turers, and bottling companies
who oppose the measure.
"I'm disappointed in their
(the Board's) behavior," Wash-
ington said. "The appearances

are very, very poor. There may
not be anything wrong going
on, or any improprieties, but it
appears very bad."
IF APPROVED by voters in
the fall, the proposal would ban
the use of non-returnable soft
drink and beer containers and
pull-tab cans. The measure
would also require a five-cent
deposit on standard bottles that
more than one company could
reuse, and a ten-cent deposit on
bottles that could be used by
only one company.
MUCC members and other
proponents of the ban claim that
enactment of the measure would
reduce litter and help conserve
energy.
Opponents claim that a throw-
away ban would do little to com-
bat litter and would leave many
workers jobless.

U-------
* HOT
ma' SUBMARINE
mm SANDWICHES
,s im available from 11 :30a.m.-7 p.m. every day
P N And of course our famous
C DEEP DISH P IZ Z Acan
* U be ordered any time from
11:30 a.m.-1 a.m.
NO COVER
U 310 MAYNARD

MICHIGAN REPERTORY'76
IT THE UIVEiRSITY OF MICNIICAN
presents
t44i
Show's Comedy
HEARTBREAK HOUSE
JULY 27 & 30; AUG. 2 & 5
Ibsen's Masterpiece
HEDDA GABLER
JULY 28 & 31; AUG. 3 & 6
Kaufman & Hart's Comedy
ONCE IN A LIFETIME
JULY 29; AUG. 1, 4 & 7
Alt Shows in the Air-conditioned Power Center
PERFORMANCE TIME-S P.M.
Tickets at Power Center Box Office. M-F 12:30-5 a.m., and
all Hudsons. For additional information call 763-3.333,

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