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July 21, 1976 - Image 13

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-07-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Wednesdoy, July 21, 1976

THE M CH 1GAN DAILY

Page Seven

Wednesday, July 21, 1976 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

Ann Arbor's

By STU McCONNELL
A lot of concrete things help
make an art fair successful -
good planning, superior artists,
a long-standing tradition of
high quality. And you can't have
a fair without laboriously - con-
structed booths, police to direct
traffic, maps of the displays,
and other such mundane splen-
dors.
But what about the more eso-
teric aspects? What about the
"atmosphere" of the city, that
quaint charm supposedly lurk-
ing behind every magic "no
parking" sign?
"ANN ARBOR IS a perfect
lace to live," says I. E. Rem-
sen, one of the artists whose
work will be on display during
the 1976 fair..
"It has the highest per capi-
ta number of artists of any city
F'ye ever seen. It's not a large
ty, but it brings in all the cul-
ral aspects of a big city -
good theater, good movies, good
bookstores, good concerts, good

radio stations," he explains.
"Ann Arbor has a lot of off-
beat restaurants and good ho-
tels," says Jim Frenza of the
city's Chamber of Commerce.
"And there's a lot of com-
munity acceptance of the fair.
People look forward to it -
there's a festive air."
SOME PEOPLE SAY Ann
Arbor provides a creative haven
for the artist.
"There's this aura in Ann
Arbor," notes Celeste Melis of
the University Artists and
Craftsmen Guild. "We had
some people stop in here from
Colorado and they were amaz-
ed at the cooperation between
the artists."
Melis adds that at other art
fairs artists will sometimes
"hoard" the fair - not tell
other artists that there is a
fair going on because it means
a smaller bite of the pie for
them. "That doesn't happen
here," she says flatly.
"I THINK WHAT impresses

charm'
artists the most is the open-
ness and sophistication of the
crowds," ventures Remsen.
"They're sophisticated and
shopping - wise are good judges
of quality. They know what ap-
poals to them, and they're will-
ing to comparison shop to see
where the best deals are," he
says.
"There's a kind of carnival
atmosphere," says Frenza. "A
lot of people don't even buy
any art, they just walk around
the crowds. You walk through
those crowds and you see a mix
of faces, all ages and types."
FRENZA ALSO believes that
Ann Arbor is more compatible
with artists' lifestyles than
other surrounding communities.
"It's looser in Ann Arbor," he
says. "The police take a more

lures artists

casual attitude, they don't has-
sle people. Some of the artists
even sleep out in the street."
Melis adds, "The city pro-
vides a good opportunity for
an artist to make a living.
There are galleries open year
roittd.''
While the city provides a
quiet, intellectual atmosphere
for artists to work in, it invites
theta to try and sell their crea-
tions at a "three-ring circus."
The Art Fair is, after all, the
city's biggest draw next to the
University football games.
"I THINK THE artists would
like a more serene atmosphere
to let their viewers walk
through," Melis laments. "You
want to have time to look at
things, to view a piece, then
step back and examine it, but

when yo're shoulder to shoul-
der in a crowd that's difficult."
Althoeugh many top - caliber
artists exhibit in the Ann Arbor
fair, the "carnival atmosphere"
also leads to commercial
schlock, like that of Ilolland,
Michigan's art fair where arti-
facts with "Ifolland, Mich."
written on them are sold. "I'd
really h<tte to see that happen
in Ann Arhor," says Melis.
Still, Ann Arbor was estab-
lished t reputation as "a great
arts fair town," Frena points
out, and one advantage of a
good reputation is that it at-
tracts better artists who add
further to thta reputation. The
city loves the fair, and the fair
lives the city. Can anything
provide a better atmosphere
than that

Stucent artists gain
practical experience

By JENNIFER MILLER
The Ann Arbor Art Fair does
tot spring up overnight through
the cracks in the pavement,
,nid wither back down after the
frantic days are over. It
a massive outgrowth of
monstths of planning by artists
tnd coordinators, who strive to
tiske each year's fair as excit-
itg and successful as the last.
Although much of the art for
the fair comes in from out-of
town, the majority is from with-
in the city. To continue the
growth and interest of this to-
cal art and talent, Ann Arbor
high school students are en-
couraged to participate in the
four day event. Since the fair
began i6 years ago, the stu-
dents and their work have been
a part, and this year is no ex-
ception.
"IT GIVES THE student an
idea of what the art world is
all about," said Cecil North, art
teacher and coordinator of this
year's exhibitors from Pioneer
High school.
Approximately 30 students
from Pioneer will be showing
their talents this year, and an-
other 30 from Huron High, co-
ordinated by Tom Bowker will
also take part. Community
High and Earthworks, two al-
ternative schools in the city,
are also expected to attend.
Paintings, pottery, jewelry,
and more will be available, and
as in past years, Bowker and
North are optimistic of suc-
cess.
"IT'S BEEN successful every
sear," North said, "and we sell
a', well as any booth."
Although the prices of stu-
dent work are on the average
lower than those of most other
pieces, Bowker estimates that
the three booths will make
around $1500-2000 for the stu-
dents. Ten per cent of this will
go toward sales tax, the li-
cense for the booths, and the
cost of materials for building
them.
Even for the students who sell
little or none of their work, the
experience is still valuable.
"You can never expect what
will sell," said North, "but it's
more for exposure than sales."
ANY STUDENT enrolled in
one of the high schools can
Participate in the fair, and
each selects which pieces he or
she wishes to display. However,

each piece is subject to approv-
at by the student's art teacher.
The pieces are evidently of
high quality, as witnessed by
the flock of people who return
year after year to purchase the
creative products of the young
artists.
"Some are more or less pa-
trons," said Bowker, adding
tiant many of these buyers come
from out-of-state.
THE BOOTHS THIS year will
be located on East University,
in front of Ulrich's bookstore.
All are invited to browse by,
whether to purchase, chat, or
simply admire. Perhaps one of
the young artists you see here
todas will be located under the
white canopy on a hot, July
day ten, or even twenty years
fronu now.

I

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Student Discounts Every Night, Along With Weekday
DRINK SPECIALS & FINE ENTERTAINMENT
RECENT PERFORMANCES INCLUDE--

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* EMMYLOU
HARRIS
July 22-24
This Week CA
July 21st CA
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516 E. LIBERTY (Near State St)

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JULY 21, 22, 23, 24
10 A.M-10 P.M.,Wed. Fri.
10 10A.M. -6 P.M., Sat.
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGA

D
M A IN STRE E T
EAST UNIVERSITY
ANN ARBOR, MIC-H.
4N ARTISTS AND CRAFTSMEN GUILD

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