100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 21, 1976 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-07-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, July 21, 1976

Lebanese factions agree to truce

BEIRUT, Lebanon (A'> - Leb-
anon's warring factions agreed
in a surprise meeting yester-
day to a short truce to evacuate
the wounded from a besieged
Palestinian refugee camp and
took tentative steps toward set-
ting up negotiations to end the
15-month war.
Participants stressed the
'very preliminary" nature of
the meeting, arranged by Egypt
and other unidentified foreign
governments. More than 50 pre-
vious truces have broken down,
including two prior attempts to
remove wounded from the Tal
Zaatar camp on the outskirts
of Beirut, and many more at-
tempts at negotiations stalled
even before a cease-fire could
be arranged.
ABU HASSAN, chief of secur-
ity for the Palestine Liberation
Organization (PLO) headed by
Yasir Arafat, met with Alexan-
dre Gxemayel, nephew of Chris-
tian Phalange party chief Pierre
Gemayel.
It was learned that among the
reported agreements reached in
the 2-hour meeting at a hotel

in west Beirut were these:
-A cease-fire at Tal Zaatar,
the Palestinian refugee camp
in Christian controlled east
Beirut, which has been under
attack for almost a month.
There are an estimated 1,000
wounded in underground bunk-
ers in the small area still con-
tralled by the leftists and Pales-
tinians. Under the truce, an In-
ternational Red Cross convoy
was to enter the camp today to
bring out some of them.
-Restoration of municipal ser-
vices to Moslem controlled west
Beirut, which has been largely
without electric power, water
or sanitation for the past two
months. As a first step, it was
reported, fuel for generators in
east Beiruet, which serve the
entire city, has been sent across
the dividing line - "the green
line" - between the two sec-
tors of the capital.
-Deployment of Saudi Arabian
and Sudanese troops of the Arab
peacekeeping force along a
stretch of the green line where
many kidnapings and killings
have occurred, among them the
abduction of U. S. Ambassa-

dor Francis Meloy and his sen-
ior political aide, who were lat-
er found slain. These troops are
to be in place within 24 hours.
-Another meeting between Abu
Hassan and Gemayel in 48
hours if all the agreements
hold up, with the possibility
of a later meeting between Ara-
fat and Pierre Gemayel to dis-
cuss issues in substance.
THE U. S. EMBASSY report-
ed yesterday it would make
one more effort to evacuate 14
Americans and 260 other per-
sons from Beirut by convoy, but
did not say when it would be
made. Sources said if the sec-
ond attempt was unsuccessful,
an airlift or sea evacuation was
likely.
The convoy was scheduled to
leave the capital yesterday, but
was called off when fighting
was reported along the route to
Damascus. The news of the
Moslem - Christian agreements
brought no announced change in
the evacuation plans from em-
bassy officials.
Alexandre Gemayel called the
possibility of peace talks be-

tween his father and Arafat
"very premature," but Abu
Hassan said the PLO would wel-
come it "if it was for some oth-
er purpose than just taking pic-
tures, and would not cause the
people to be disappointed
again."
LIBYAN PREMIER Abdul
Salam Jalloud, who has been
mediating the split between Sy-
ria and Palestinian forces caus-
ed by Syria's military inter-
vention in Lebanon, was report-
ed to have returned to Beirut.
He met yesterday with senior
leftist leaders, and some top
PLO officials were reported
preparing to go to Damascus to
set up a meeting between Ara-
fat and President Hafez Assad
to discuss reconciliation.
At Tal Zaatar, the Moslem
radio reported that Christian
forces launched yet another
assault on the beleaguered
camp.
TWO PREVIOUS attempts by
the Red Cross to evacuate
wounded from the camp failed
because cease-fires broke down.

Jean Hoefliger, Swiss director
of the Red Cross team here,
said last week he would not risk
the lives of his workers again
without an ironclad truce.
Hoefliger, who attended part
of yesterday's meeting, said af-
terward he was optimistic about
the prospects for today's ,con-
voy for getting into the camp,
but called it a test.
"They met and they seemed
to agree," he said. "We would
only stress the points that
didn't work before - security
and the cease-fire, which must
work if we are to go in."
HOEFLIGER SAID the first
convoy will try to bring out
about 100 wounded, and if the
cease-fire holds, more will be
evacuated. The biggest danger,
he said, may be panic among
the refugees who have been
trapped inside the camp. Tal
Zaatar had a population of
about 30,000 people when the
siege began.
The combined port of Long
Beach and Los Angeles is the
largest on the Pacific Coast.

A SPECIAL ART FAIR EVENT...
Ic ilrA iJl~ n12

THURSDAY, July 22
ONLY 1:00 & 3:00
BUSTER
KEATON'S
1927 }
Silent Classic
"The
General"
with
LIVE ORGAN
Accompin-
ment!
ALL SEATS $1.00

ONLY 1:00 & 3:00
L ON
CHANEY'S
Immortal 1925
^Silent Classic
"THE
PHANTOM
OF THE
OPERA"
with LIVE ORGAN
Accompoinment
ALL SEATS $1.00

I

at the MICHIGAN THEATRE
NEW Student Ticket Rate
$2.00
FOR
JOHANN STRAUSS' COMIC OPERETTA,
N/cddrma us
Irsseuted by
ThetUniursayof Michgon, Scho(d ofMusic
8 O)p.m. August 12,13 14,1:a
1Icor Centerfor the[ forming Arts
All seats reserved $3 1 and $4 i

A REFUGEE IN THE southern Lebanese city of Tyre uses a rope to hoist himself aboard a
departing ship bound for Egypt. Continued heavy fighting between Moslems, Christians, Syrians
and leftists has caused a mass exodus of both Lebanese and foreigners from the country.
Sheriff Postill booked

(Continued from Page 1)
enough evidence to b r i n g
charges of assault and battery,
but the ends of justice do not
require a felony prosecution."
Asault and battery, a mis-
demeanor, is punishable by up
to 90 days in jail. Those con-
victedoa felony may be sen-

tenced to a maximum of four
years in prison as well as barred
from becoming police officers.
Delhey, whose office will take
on Baysinger's case against
Postill, plans to defer action in
the case until a later date.
FOLLOWING the 4 p.m. filing
of the libel suits, Postill and his
attorneys spoke with members
of the press. Regarding his re-
election bid in the upcoming
primary, Postill said, "Most
people will see through this
charge, which is more like a
civil suit than anything. I think

its a last minute attempt by
Garris to foil the election."
"I maintain that I acted prop-
erly and legally (during the
fight) . . . in my position (as
sheriff) I bad a legal and moral
obligation to break it up," he
said.
Both Postill and Donley ve-
hemently deny making death
threats concerning either of the
Baysingers.
NEAL BUSH, an attorney for
the two, said, "Our next step is
to have the charge dismissed
and file (a similar charge)
against Baysinger."

Theatre Co. of Ann Arbor
PRESENTS
THEY'RE BACK
EXCERPTS FROM BOTH MAD MADONNAS AND
BITCH, YOU CRAZY!
July 21, 22, 23, 24
Trueblood Auditorum
in the Frieze Bldg.
CURTAIN: 8:00 P.M. TICKETS $2.50
Sponsored by U of M Women's Commission

i
M
M
E
I
M

TONIGHT-Campus Favorite
(Joshua Logon, 1967) AUD. A-7 & 9:45
CAMELOT
Film from the popular Lerner and Loewe Broadway musical
based on T.H. White's "The Once and Future King." Three
Academy Accrds. Richard Harris, Vanessa Redgrave, David
Emmings.
$125, AUD. A ANGELL HALL

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan