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May 11, 1976 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-05-11

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Tuesdoy, May 11, 1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

.-

'Mo' stumps area

Ford hopes to rebound in Nebraska

(Continued from Page 3)
After his speech, Udall, a for-
mer pro basketball player, walk-
ed over to Community High
School and played a game
with Wolverine stars Rickey
Green, John Robinson and Way-
man Britt. He compared Michi-
gan's primary to a basketball
game. "This may be the last
state I can take Carter one-on-
one," he said.
tUdall emphasized the import-
ance of the Michigan primary
while speaking at Southfield's
Northland Mall. "Michigan can
turn it around the way North
Carolina turned it around for
Reagan," he said, "If I win
Michigan I'll take Ohio, Oregon
and New Jersey"
In the last week United Auto
Workers (UAW) chief Leonard
Woodcock and AFL-CIO presi-
dent George Meany have come
out in favor of Carter, giving
him some key labor support in
his bid for the Democratic nom-
ination. Udall contends these en-
dorsements mean nothing.
"In Pennsylvania the leaders
endorsed (Henry) Jackson but
Jimmy Carter got the rank and
file. I intend to do the same
here," he said to a group of
shoppers in Hamtramck.
At the WKBD-TV studios in
Southfield, Detroit television per-
sonality Lou Gordon announced
that Udall was challenging Car-
ter to a debate on his show this
weekend. Udall promised he
VU'names
affirmative
(Continued from Page 1)
with the Commission for Wo-
men and Commission for Minor-
ity Affairs. Other tasks include
reviewing affirmative a c t i o n
programs to see that proper
steps are taken to assure com-
pliance, maintaining liaison with
government officials concerned
with affirmative action, and
making periodic reports to the
University on the progress of
the affirmative action programs.
"The director of affirmative
action is not a one-person task.
I see myself as a co-ordinator
for lots of activities," explained
Baker. "I need cooperation and
support from all interested fac-
ulty, staff and students. It is a
total University effort-I happen
to have the responsibility for or-
ganizing and directing it."
BAKER WOULD like to see
statistical changes in affirma-
tive action and make sure that
women and minorities receive
comparable treatment in terms
of salaires and wages, fringe
benefits and opportunities for
advancement."
"I am not a magician. There
is no reason why statistics will
jump when I become director,"
said Baker. "It is important to
me to make the necessary
changes in terms of process so
that numbers will change. Fore-
most, I want to see more than
just verbal or wirtten commit-
ments, I want to see action."
Baker believes that changes
in behavior-in men as well as
women-will come with time.
"By building supports within
the system, perceptions will be-
gin to change - not only in
males, but in women and minor-
ities as well."
AS A MEMBER of the first
Commission for Women in 1970,
Baker is pleased with her new
hook-up to both commissions.
"I have respect for the current
commissions as well as the past
ones. I hope that the excellent
leadership will coitinue.
"I am confident that I will be
able b w o r k with Joseph

"will press Carter very hard"
to appear with him on the broad-
cast. Gordon revealed that "a
member of Congress very close
to the president" had asked him
if Ford could appear on the
show at the same time. Gordon
added that he would invite
Ford's challenger, former Cali-
fornia Gov. Ronald Reagan, to
appear on the show.
In a swing through the Detroit
suburbs, Udall addressed him-
self to the problem of urban
housing. At the Eastland Mall,
in Harper Woods, he proposed
to "rehabilitate the old hous-
ing," and "spread out low-
income housing so no one com-
munity has to take the burden."
One of the problems connected
with low-income housing in the
Detroit area is the refusal of a
suburb to accept federal money
to construct housing. Udall said,
"if a city won't accept federal
funds then we will have two
kinds of countries - decaying
cities and (the) suburbs." How-
ever, he said this would not
happen. "The suburbs can't es-
cape it," he commented. "Al-
ready the rot is coming past 8
mile."
Udall will spend the next eight
days starting today campaign-
ing in the state. He will focus
on one issue every day, explain-
ing his stand and attacking Car-
ter's viewpoint, according to a
Udall staffer.
Baker new
action head
Wright, Chairperson for Com-
mission for M i n o r it i e s and
Eunice Burns, Chairperson for
Commission for Women," she
adds. "I know that the kinds of
things we can do together will
have a great impact."
Baker has served on various
University groups, including the
Commission for Women, School
of Education Commission for
Women, Academic Council of
the Center for Afro-American
and African Studies and Inter-
national Women's Year Com-
mittee.
AT STATE and national levels,
Baker serves on the Multi-Cul-
tural Commission for the Ameri-
can Association for Colleges of
Teacher Education. This 800
member institution conducts sur-
veys to determine where teach-
er training programs are need-
ed and sets up leadership train-
ing institutes.
Baker is also a member of a
panel of five wirters appointed
by the state Department of
Education to write the multi-
cultural guidelines for the
state's public schools.
Dr. William L. Cash, Jr., as-
sistant to the president, will
serve as acting director until
Baker assumes office on July 1
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Her owners love her.
CALL 434-5111

(Continued from Page 1)
and talk."
In recent weeks, Meany has
told his political strategists that
the AFL-CIO would back Carter
if he became the nominee. But
Meany also said support would
be keyed to an acceptable clari-
fication of Carter's stand on la-
bor issues.
There have been reports of
increasing pressure within the
AFL-CIO to abandon its official
policy of neutrality and voice
at least some expression of
Tenants
Union
wins'
(Ctnused from iPager3)
stairs toilet and shower for four-
and-a-half months. The house
allegedly had a history of sew-
age back-ups, warped floors, and
cracked walls but was able to
pass city inspection last March.
Claiming the seven defendants
were "indolent and slothful" and
had no justification for holding
back $2,240 in rent due, Epstein
filed suit against the tenants
seeking an abatement of the
rent for the period the defend-
ants lived on Prospect.
Feeling "exploited and dis-
content" the tenants filed a
counter claim charging Epstein
with neglect of duty.
Before the verdict, the tenants
expressed relief that their or-
deal with Epstein's house, which
they describe as "horrible, de-
moralizing, disgusting, depress-
ing and frustrating" was over.

support for the Carter cam-
paign.
ONLY 25 delegates are at
stake in the Nebraska contest,
but the psychological stakes are
high and a win could help Ford
hold off Reagan in the Presi-
dent's home state of Michigan,
where the former California
governor is reported coming
on. The statewide popularity
contest has no relation to the
delegate selection, which is
done by slates in each of the
three Congressional districts.
Ford, who trails Reagan 396-
309 in the delegate count with
347 uncommitted, observed Arm-
ed Forces Day yesterday with
a speech at the Washington
Monument. The President used
the occasion to counter one of
the issues that Reagan has been
stressing by reiterating that
the nation's "defenses are
strong and we will keep them
strong."
Presidential Press Secretary
Ron Nessen said Ford is opti-
mistic about his chances in
Nebraska and West Virginia,
but feels both will be a "close
fight."
C R O S S O V E R voting,
which seemed to help Reagan
in Texas and Indiana, is not

allowed in Nebraska and that
gives Ford one edge.
But Reagan may have an ad-
vantage in the race for. dele-
gates. Reagan workers have
been advertising the names of
delegates nledged to their can-
didate since early in the cam-
paign but Ford's state cam-
paign chairman opposed such
advertising as against state
tradition, and the President's
slates have only been publiciz-
ed for the last week.
There are 11 candidates on
the Democratic ballot in Ne-
braska, where the secretary
of state can list anyone thought
to be a serious candidate. But
the contest for the 23 delegates
is really between Carter and
Church, who entered the race
late and made Nebraska the
site of his first major effort.
That effort has made the Ida-
ho senator the focus here for
the stop-Carter movement.
Church, who hopes to pick up
delegates throughout the West,
had headquarters in seven Ne-
braska cities and staff mem-
bers estimated he spent $125,000
in the state.
Carter, on the other hand,
spent two days in Nebraska,
and spent an estimated $40,000
there.

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