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July 14, 1976 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1976-07-14

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, July 14, 1976

Humphrey speech dr
(Costinued frsom Page1) firm our independence and
seem tepid by comparison. vote out the Republican Tories.
Few of the remarks made in "IF THEY (the Republicans)
lttnsphrev's ten minute ad- wish to be hesrd let them go to
dress to the Democrats receiv- Kansas City," he said. "There
ed less thn the warmest of ap- they will find the Republican
pro-al. President and his tired old par-
Taking a stih at the onnos- ty who tell us we do not need
ing Rrnrblion party, H1um- fresh imagination and new
phrrv told the delegates, "In ideas.
1776 the American neople pro- "After right years of phases,
cl-imed their independence freezes and failure; of start-
and throw out the British Tor- uips and slow - downs, of high
ies. Well, I'm here to tell you prices and fewer jobs, we are
tonight that in 1976 the Ameri- still being asked for just a lit-
can people will once agoin af- tle more time and patience. Go
Televi viewing t

aws cheers Carter platform receives
slow, not now, no, no, veto -L i c v
said the Minnesota senator. This

is their policy. Well, we've had
enough of this defeatism."
Touching on an issue remi-
niscent of his party's last gath-
ering four years ago, the sena-
tor said, "In the 1960's, a rele-
tively few Americans out of our
200 million were involved di-
rectly in the war in Vietnam. It
was a war ten thousand miles
away. It's burden was borne by
few. Never the less, the pain
and the suffering of those few
grew into widespread guilt, dis-
sension, and bitterness at home
as if the whole spirit of this
nation was sapped.
le continued, "Today, just as
the war in Vietnam ultimately
poisoned the whole politic of
America, so will the continued
loss of income and the failure to
provide jobs for a minority of
our people ultimately sap our
strength and the spirit of our
people."
Continuing his address to the
unemployment issue - an is-
sie which has been the subject
of much controversy in this
1976 presidential race - Hum-
phrey declared, "We must bring
every willing and able - bodied
American into the mainstream
of American economic life.
Work, not welfare. Paychecks,
not the dole.

I f ? 7 fl 13 NEws
C I1ID)tEAMYOF JEANNiIE
20 ('IS('o KID)
30 ZOOM
50IM MADV BUNCh
6:30 4 13 NBC NEWS
--Chan-ellor Brinkley
ii Cus NEws-waIter
('enakitef
20 DANIL (O()NE
50 I ILOVE LUCY
7:00 3 Cns NERS S-aler
13 IEMIn('RATIC
CONVENTIOS
7 ABC NEWS-Ilarry
ANII)Y (GItIFFiTII
11 FAMIIY AFFAIR
30 RO0FRT MaeNEIL
RI POH1T
511FAIII AFFAIR
56 IGACY AMERIICAN%
62 SPEAKING (OF SIORTS
7:30 2 11 DEMOCRATIC
CONVENTION
7 COIiTROOM
5 ROOM 222
20 STUMP TIE STARS
30 CROCKETT'S VICTORY
G A RDEN
50 IIOGAN'S HEROES
56 ROBERT MacNEIl. RE-
PORT
62 NEWS
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume I.XXXVI, No. 45-S
Wednesday, July 14, 1576
is edited and managed by students
at the tniversity of Michigan News
phone 764-0311. Second co epostage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 40109.
Published d a i I y Tuesday through
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Summer session published Tue-
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Subscription rates: $6 50 in Ann
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8:00 7 BIONIC WOMAN
T9 ) TIlE SEA IN STIIPS
20 1IT TAKES A TIIIEF
30 56 NOVA
50 MERV GRIFFIN
62 MOVIE
"Fighter Attack"
9:00 7 DEMOCRATIC
CONVENTION
:>0 700 CLUB
30 56 GREAT
PERFORMANCES
50 MOVIE
"Garden of Evil."
9:30 9 MUSIC MACIIINE
10:00 DE10CRATIC CONVEN-
TION
30561.IFE OF I.EONARDO
DA VINCI
62 PTL CLUB
10:30 20 TIlE ItOCK
11:00 4 13 NEW NS
20 ADVENTURES IN
PARADISE
50 BEST OF GROUCHO
DEMOCRATIC CONVEN-
TION
It the rcnvention runs over-
tim, neatwork coverage Bmay
pre-empt or delay the start
of scheduled programming.
11:30 2 11 NEWS
4 13 JOHNNY CARSON
9 CBC NEWS
50 MOVIE
"San Quentin"
56 ABC NEWS
12:00 2 MARY HARTMAN,
MARY HARTMAN
Mary gives instructions to
Tom's sex therapist, and hears
the story about Muriel's scar
from Loretta
7 62 NEWS
11 MOVIE
f"The Fixer"
12:30 2 MOVIE
"The Fixer"
7 24 MOVIE
"Returning Home"
1:0f 4 TOMORROW
13 NEWS
2:00 4 CLASSROOM
7 NEWS
2:20 11 NEWS
2:30 4 NEWS
2:50 2 PROTECTORS
3:50 2 NEWS

(Continuedfrom Page 1)
AT THE convention's mara-
thon second session, nearly nine
hours long, the party's last two
presidential n o m i n e e s, Sen.
George McGovern of South Da-
kota and Sen. Hubert Humphrey
of Minnesota, took turns assail-
ing the Republicans who defeat-
ed them.
Two of the vice presidential
prospects, M u s k i e and Sen.
Frank Church of Idaho, were
among the party leaders who
spoke on platform planks. Both
drew cheers centered in their
state delegations, and there
were chants of "We want
Church" after his denunciation
of Republican foreign policy.
Humphrey said the voters will
t h r o w out the "Republican
Tories" and make Carter presi-
dent. (See related story below).
McGovern called for the kind
of Democratic unity his 1972
ticket was denied, and said
America cannot afford four
more years of an administration
in which the veto has been used
"53 times . . .. to paralyze the
elected representatives of the
American people."
THEN CAME platform time,
but it was a show, not a de-
bate, a succession of speeches

by party leaders on each sec-
tion of the document that was
set in advance.
That brought Muskie to the
microphone, to accuse Presi-
dent Ford of saying no, no and
no again, to economic and jobs
programs Americans need. "We
need not government by veto
but government by inspired
leadership," he said.
JACQUELINE Kennedy Onas-
sis, widow of John Kennedy, at-
tending her first convention,
received a standing ovation
from the delegates. When her
husband was nominated in 1960,
she did not attend the conven-
tion because she was pregnant.
Alabama Gov. George Wal-
lace was chosen to speak of
government reform, which is
covered in the platform with a
plank pledging the kind of ov-
erhaul and consolidation for
which Carter has campaigned.
Wallace put his own stamp on
the issue, and in a line he used
from a hundred platforms in his
own quests for the presidency,
told the convention: "Some of
these bureaucratic briefcase
toters ought to have their brief-
cases thrown in the Potomac
River because the American
people would be better off."

Udall releases delegates

(Continued fromPage1)
Udall, who will be nominated
by former Watergate Special
Prosecutor Archibald Cox to-
night at Madison Square Gar-
den, told his committed dele-
gates that he was relinquishing
his legal hold over their votes
to allow them to cast their first
ballot this evening for the can-
didate of their choice.
"I ADVISED Governor Carter
in June that I would not stand
in the way of any Udall dele-
gate who wished to be with the
obvious first ballot winner," he
explained, "and I will take nec-
essary action to guarantee that
each delegate under my banner
will be able to vote his con-
science."
That statement drew the first
set of hisses heard yesterday in
the Gold Ballroom of the Statler
Hilton, where Udall made his
statement.
The second display of delegate
disappointment came when a re-
porter asked the Arizona repre-
sentative if his decision to ac-
cept Cox's nomination tonight
wasn't "just a charade to take
up time."
UDALL WAITED for his dele-

gates to quiet and then said to
the reporter, "I think you've
heard the answer from my sup-
porters."
Although Udall released his
delegates yesterday, many of
the campaign die-hards are still
sticking with their man.
"I worked on his campaign in
Arizona and feel very close to
him," said Arizona delegate
Karen Scates.
"I'm still going to vote for
him. I can't help but to feel
that he still has a chance.
Where were all these people
when we needed them?" she
asked, motioning to the cheer-
ing crowd.
"IT'S KIND of saddening, like
election night '72," she added,
"but it's not a wake. To know
Mo is to love him. He's really
dynamite."
"He's beautiful," gushed New
York delegate Miriam Jackson.
"I love everything he says. The
Carter supporters are very thin,
they don't have the same strong
commitment to the campaign
that we Udall supporters have.
You bet I'm still going to vote
for him."

Udall's daughter Bambi, 22,
who accompanied her parents
yesterday afternoon, applauded
her father's announcement to
accept Cox's nomination.
"I'M REALLY pleased with
what he decided to do," she
said. "His decision to put his
name in nomination is a natural
decision after all he's stood for,
And if the showing in that room
is any indication, then he will
probably lose very few votes by
releasing his delegates.
"I'm coming out of this with
something much more impor-
tant than the nomination and
that's tremendous pride in him,"
she said.
As Udall's smile began to
drop while fielding more serious
questions from the press, one of
his delegates sighed to no one
in particular, "Jokes, Mo. Come
on, Mo, give us the jokes."
"Oh, he's got some new ones,"
another supporter said to her.
"He's getting into animal jokes.
It was turtles yesterday, and
frogs on Sunday."
"It must be from hanging
around with all these tigers,"
she responded, smiling.

HOUSING DIVISION.
BAITS HOUSES,
Resident Staff Applications
For 1976-77 Academic Year
AVAILABLE STARTING JULY 12, 1976
IN HOUSING OFFICE, 1500 S.A.B.
POSITION Resident Advisor, Baits Houses
OPENING: (Graduate Coed Hall)
Advisory positions reouire Junior status or above for the
Resident Advisor positions.
OUALIFICATIONS: (1) Must be o resistered U. of M.
student on the Ann Arbor Campus in onod academic stand-
inn during the period of employment. (21 Must have lived
in residence halls at University level for ot least one vear.
(3) Must hove o 2.5 orade point overooe at time of oppli-
cation. 14) Preference is given to applicants who do not
intend to carry heavy academic schedules and who do not
have rioorous outside commitments. (5) Proof of these
ouolifications mov be required.
Current staff and other applicants who have an applicotion
on file must come to this office to update their application
form.
DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS: 3:00 P.M., JULY 16, 1976
A Non-Discriminatorv Affirmative Action Emplover

THE YOGA CENTER OF ANN ARBOR
Invites You to Come Celebrate the 76th Birthday
of GURU ESTRADA
July 1e6thFri WELCOME: Meditation; Concert; Puppet Show; Dinner 5:00
S1h .p.m. at the YOGA CENTER
Juy in '501 gt JOIN US EVERY MORNING FOR: Psychophysicals, 6:00 a.m.;
l , 1 -LL Cosmic Ceremony and Teachinq led by the
ELDER BROTHER, 7:00 a.m. YOGA CENTER
Sat. Lecture: "PEACE: FROM WORLD CONFLICT TO WORLD
Ju ORDER"by the GURU, 8:00 p.m. YOGA CENTER
Cosmic Ceremony and Teachina iven by the ELDER BROTHER
Ju 8th, . 0:00am.SYOGA CENTER; POTLUCK PICNIC in the
Abrtmat 2:00 p.m.
July 19th, Mon. MEDITATION led by the GURU, 7:00 p.m. YOGA CENTER
Oth, cs Lecture: "SOLAR INITIATION in the AMERICAS" by
Juv . the Guru, 8:00 p.m. YOGA CENTER
Panel Representing a SYNTHESIS of SCIENCE, ART and
ul 2ste'1 YOGA by: YEN. ELDER BROTHER ESTRADA, Prof. Max
.T H Heirich, Prof. Richard Mann, Prof. Albert Mullin, 8:00 p.m.
af FRIENDS MEETING HOUSE, 1420 Hill Street, Ann Arbor
500 MILLER ST--769-4321

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