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July 13, 1976 - Image 10

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-07-13

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page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, Juiy 13, 1976

Pag Tn HEMIHIANDALY ueda, ul,1,.97

I

It's a Democratic party in NYC

(Cmn1iInii ed fram PRtP i i
er to meet their host for the
week, as doctored pictures of
familiar city sites flashed be-
hind him on a screen that cov-
ered nearly one watt of the
targe, garish batllroom.
And Beame guests, aware of
the festive spirit, didn't trou-
be hizoner with queries on the
party platform or his man Jim
mv Carter's politics.
"TIHE ACCENT seems to be
more on fun here than any-
thing else, sir," commented one
reporter to Beame.
"And why not?" he answered.
"After alt, the session hasn't
begun yet and they (the dele-
gates) wart to take advantage
of that. Normally we don't know
who the candidate's going to
he, but this yeai we know. So
that's why there's all this
spirit."
"Tttis is the first time I've
ever been is tihis b. tof a groutp
of )emocrats with everyone
having such a gwl time," said
Terrl Eriksmoen, an aternate
delegate from North Dakota.
"It's great''
"YEAhi, OUR state has one
caucus this nmrning," added

Eliot Glassheim, another North
Dakota alternate, "and every-
one wanted to get away early.
They wanted to sightsee and all
that. There's nothing to do.
He's (Carter) already nominat-
ed. The primary system has re-
placed the convention so there's
no work to be done."
Ypsilanti delegate Ethel Ilo-
ward, clapping her hands to the
infectious beat of the "J.C.
White Gospel Singers," who had
replaced the jazz band on cen-
ter stage, shrugged her shoul-
ders when asked about her day's
schedule. "Unless you're on one
of the committees, you don't
have to do any work outside of
going to the convention . . .
and I'm not on any of the com-
mittees.
"We drove down last night,"
she continued, "and I was tired
but I went out and did all those
fun things anyway. And I in-
tend to have aii even better
time tonight."
BUT CONVENTION h o o p 1a
wasn't contained to the Ililton's
ballroom. Nary a corner of the
West Side has escaped the gala
spirit which this Democratic
extravaganza has brought to the

city. n
Every store window, every
hotel, every restaurant in Man-
hattan is boasting a sparkling
convention d i s p 1 a y complete
with bright red, white and blue
bunting left over from New
York's July 4 birthday bash.
Macy's, luring delegates in-
side with signs advertising "spe-
cial accommodations," is busy
granting courtesy charge cards
for the week to delegates at
their "Delegate Center" on the
second floor fur department.
"I IMAGINE that even if the
delegate has work to do the wife
or husband is here to have fun,"
said saleswoman Theresa Pe-
rez, poring over the afternoon's
request for courtesy charges.
"T h e y' r e (delegates) all
over the store from what I un-
derstand."
Less established entrepeneurs
are also cashing in on the party
spirit, lining the hot, city streets
to display their talents and
wares with hopes of garnering
a few of t h a s e out-of-state
bucks.
A four-man brass band played
a heel kicking selection of polkas
outside of Madison Square Gar-
den-the scene of official con-
vention business-as a steady
stream of conventioneers flowed
through the Garden doors be-
fore the 8 p.m. commencement
of the day's political activities.
The trumpet player, clad in
suede shorts and embroidered
suspenders, circulated a black
top hat to an appreciative au-
dience who tossed liberal hand-

fuls of coins at it in payment
for the entertainment.
SEVERAL FEET away New
Yorkers Larry McDonald ("like
the hamburgers") and Alan Ga-
relic peddled their own brand
of convention mania. "Buy a
genuine Carter peanut," Garelic
pleaded with scores of onlook
ers who looked at, laughed at,
but rarely purchased the var-
nished peanuts decorated with
a small flag reading "Jimmy."
"I just wish Mr. Carter were
here to see it," said McDonald.
"How long will the peanuts
last?" a potential buyer asked.
"AT LEAST until his (Car-
ter's) second term," a passerby
answered, drawing giggles fron
the assembled crowd.
Across the street from the
Garden at the Statler Hilton--a
virtual theater of convention ac-
tivity-TV cameras and bright
klieg lights bang like Christmas
tree ornaments from every ceil-
ing, staircase, and rafter in the
building. No corner of the hotel
lobby is withopt a network re-
porter shoving a microphone
into some delegate's or politi-
cian's face.
"People go bananas dancing
to get into the shimmering light
of the television camera," noted
Steve Littlejohn of England,
one of six Democrats Abroad
delegates, as he sat and rested
on thickly carpeted floor.
"There's a great deal of pow-
er, status and prestige of be-
ing anointed by the light."

AUDITIONS
Are Now Being Held for the
University of Michigan Chorus
All interested persons are welcomed but
Tenors are particularly encouraged to
audition. The Choir meets from Monday
through Thursday, 11:30 A.M. to 12:30
in The School of Music Recital Hall.
PROF. LEONARD JOHNSON IS THE DIRECTOR
TELEPHONE 995-2857 or 995-1493 or
764-6118 FOR INFORMATION
HOUSING DIVISION
BAITS HOUSES
Resident Staff Applications
For 1976-77 Academic Year
AVAILABLE STARTING JULY 12, 1976
IN HOUSING OFFICE, 1500 S.A.B.
POSITION Resident Advisor, Baits Houses
OPEN!NG: (Graduate Coed Hall)
Advisory positions reouire Junior status or above for the
Resident Advisor positions.
QUALIFICATIONS: (I Ma-is b registered U. of M.
student an the Ass Arbor Coaus in aoad academic stand-
ing durina the poriod of emwlovment (2) Must hove ived
in r-sicdence hulls at University leve for at least one tear
(3, Most have a 2.5 arade oint u0"ra" at time of apph-
cation. (4 Preference is aiven to applicants who do not
intend to carry heavy academic schedules and who do not
have riaorous outside commitmeins 15() Proof of these
ulifications may be reauired.
Current staff and other appticants who have an aoplication
on file mast came to this office to update their appticatian
form.
DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS: 3:00 P.M., JULY 16, 1976
A Non-Discriminatorv Affirmative Action Emplover

Dem convention

(Continued fom Page ] ]
. . . We have made mi
takes," she said. "We admit
them. In our haste to do all
things for all people, we did not
foresee the full consequences of
our actions. And when the peo-
ple raised their voices in pro-
test, we did not listen." But she
said those mistakes are not ir-
reversible.
REP, JORDAN s a i d what
Democrats promise, they must
deliver. "If we propose, we
must produce. If we ask for
sacrifice, we must be the first
to give. If we make mistakes,
we must be willing to admit
them."
"This isaone additional bit at
evidence t h a t the American
dream need not forever be de-
ferred," she said.
There were echoes of the Car-
ter campaign in Glenn's text.
He spoke of compassion, of con-
fidence, of a government grown

so big and complex as to leave
Americans feeling powerless.
". . . THERE ARE doubts in
a nation that is the envy of the
world," he said. "There are
fears in a nation that has pro-
vided a good life for more peo-
ple than any nation in history.
And there is lagging confidence
in a nation deserving of our
pride.''
Glenn said the key to restored
confidence, control and freedom
"lies in renewed partnership
between citizens and their gov-
ernment." He said that will take
new leaders, men with vision,
"a Democratic president and
the next Democrttic adminis-
tration -.. .
WHILE THE b i g political
show opened at Madison Square
Garden, the power was uptown,
at the Americana Hotel where
Carter held vice presidential in-
terviews, conferred with black
Democratic leaders, and worked

"THERE'S ONE big party
atmosphere, here," he added.
"New York is one huge party
and I think it's great,"
At the other end of the lobby
a young girl yelled to her moth
er, "Did you see Jane Fonda?
"She's inside," the girl pant-
ed, pointing with her Kodak
Instamatic to the Statler'
terraced ballroom, which has
been renamed "the Donkey
Den" for the week's festivites
"She's a performer!"
FONDA was at the Statlei
with her husband Tom Havden
- the former political activist
who with John Conyers ad
dressed a hastily assembled
group of delegates and report-
ers on what he called "making
dramatic changes in the United
States political system."
Fonda also spoke to the crowd
in strict, serious tones about
corporate taxing and the na
tion's outmoded economic sys
tem. The actress - gone - polti
cal activist wouldn't have al
preciated her young fan's re
marks nor those of the two
delegates who stuffed thetm
selves like sardines into an
overly crowded elevator follow
ing the Ilayden address.
"That was good," one said,
dismissing Hayden's speech in
one remark. "Did you eat well
today?" she said in her next
breath to her fellow delegate
"Oh, yes," she replied. "The
rolls of the women's caucus
meeting were delicious
opens
out a compromse with a de
gation bent on enlarging the
future convention role of wo-
men
Carter conducted his last ts
vice presidential interiew
talking with Seas. Frank Church
of Idaho and Adlai Stevenson
ItI of Illinois. That made seven
interviews all told.
But Rep. PetereRsdino o'ew
Jersey asked yesterday toi be
dropped from the list.
C a r t e r announced Rodino-
withdrawal and said the con
gressman w o u 1 d deliver te
s p e e c h nominating himu io
President Wednesday night
Davis hits
0 0
repression in
Detroit talk
coninuedfrommPage 6)
The Wilmington ten were se
tenced to a total of 282 years flii
lowing the longest trial inNrtt
Carolina's history. All remaminin
prisons but their cries ofin-
nocence hose been heard tn
supported' by the Distrct of
Columbia City Council,hti
United Church of Christ an
many other church, labor atd
political organizations.
DAVIS herself was aquili
just four years ago on chag
of murder, kidnaping and
spiracy, after gaining globsi
port for her defense.
"I'm convinced if there hadt
been the kind of movement
around me I'd still be sitting i
a California institution," sic
declared,
it is estimated about 22 ml
lion California residents go fish-
ing every year.

How to have
A Bird's-Eye view
without even
flying
Onlyj at Bicycle Jim's
We don't clip
your wallet's
wings either!

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