100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 10, 1976 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-07-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Saturday, July 10, 1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

Saturday, July 10, 1976 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Five

Advice to Democratic 'Idi Amin is very
S Bsick, doctor says
delegates:Bing on (Ctued fromPage 3) ers' demands and mowed do
m n nd br ma h hld thn trniet Ahno ')AT U

own
rd.

NEW YORK (A') - If the
delegates to the Democratic Na-
tional Convention opening here
next week are typical conven-
tion-goers, they can each figure
on spending almost $80 a day
during their stay in the city.
The figure comes from Charles
Gillett, president of the New
York City Convention and Visi-
tors Bureau. It's based on a
survey the bureau did three
years ago.
GILLETT . SAID the bureau
found the average convention-
goer spent $313.11 for a 4%-day
stay. He added ten per cent for
inflation - a very conservative
figure - and came up with $350
or $77.78 per day at 1976 levels.
Actually, there is an impor-
tant difference between the
Democratic delegates and most
other convention-goers. The del-
egates are paying their own
way. Gillett says that a tourist
usually spends less than a busi-
ness visitor because the tourist
"is spending his own money."
And the Democrats may feel the
same way.
According to the bureau sur-
vey, the average convention-
goer spends just about 40 per
cent of his or her money on a
hotel bill. That would work out
to about $140.35 at the 1976
spending level or about $35 a
night for four nights.
SINGLE rooms at the Statler-
Hilton, convention headquarters
hotel, range from $33 to $45, de-
pending on availability. The rate
for the rooms arranged by the
Democratic National Committee
is $38 a day.
Robert Tisch, chairman of the
Citizens Committee for the
Democratic National Conven-
tion, said a delegate could get
by on $50 a day, including a
hotel bill of $16. That $16, how-
ever, is for the dormitory-style
accommodations available for

delegates at New York, Colum-
bia and Fordham Universities.
How many delegates have opt-
ed for the low-cost living? "Not
that many," conceded Tisch,
although he had no prtcise fig-
ures.
FOOD AND beverages for the
typical convention-goer accord-
ing to the bureau survey, work
out to about $27 a day. That in-
cludes meals in the hotel and at
outside restaurants. Remember:
breakfast in a hotel can be ex-
pensive. Gillett estimated the
cost of a continental breakfast
at $2.50 to $3.50. The Statler-
Hilton charges 65 cents for a
cup of coffee; refills extra.
In addition, the visitor spends
about $60 at retail stores during
his or her stay, $11 for local
transportation, $12 for theaters
and movies, $2.50 for sightseeing
and $6.50 for night clubs and
sports events. The rest goes for
miscellaneous expenses.
One Democratic official, Ala-
bama state chairman Bob
Vance, toured the city in ad-
vance of the convention, then
estimated that each delegate
would need $1,000 to see him
through the four-day meeting.
GILLETT conceded that it
wouldn't be hard to spend that
much money. Lunch at the 21
club can easily run $25 a per-
son. "Expensive," Gillett said,
"but it is 21."
At the same time, Gillett said,
there are plenty of reasonably
priced restaurants around for
the 6,000 delegates and alter-
nates and their families. The
bureau's restaurant guide lists
a variety of eating places offer-
ing meals for between $5 and
$10 per person.
"You can figuratively eat your
way around the world," said
Gillett. "We think that New
York City offers practically
everything." Besides, he added,

"when people travel, they really
don't want to be economizing
all the time."
GILLETT said that the dele-
gate who comes from a large
city - San Francisco, Chicago
or Miami, for example - prob-
ably won't find new York City
prices any higher than those at
home:
For the delegate from a small
town, "the cost will be higher,
but you will also find the quality
will be higher," he boasted.
The city's Consumer Affairs
Department, meanwhile, has
had 35 inspectors checking re-
tail businesses from horse-drawn
carriages to restaurants.
"WE JUST want the stores to
know that we're paying attention
to them with the convention
coming and we don't want
people ripped off," said Jean
Ende of the department.
All the delenates will receive
a booklet, "Welcome Visiting
Consumer," spelling out many
of the city's antifraud laws. The
boklet reminds visitors - and
residents as well - not to be
tNred by the unbelievable bar-
gin and to use common sense.
Among the tourist attractions
that the delegates might visit,
both the Empire State Building
and the World Trade Center
charge $1.70 for a visit to the
observation deck. Children un-
der twelve are half price.
Open All Weekend
FRI. and SAT.
11 a.m.-I a.m.
SUNDAYS
1 p.m.-l2 mid.
BILLIARDS,
BOWLING
and PINBALL
At the UNION

men ana crew mem ers nei
by hijackers at Uganda's En-
tebbe airport last weekend.
. "I am certain that in the end
I succeeded," he said.
THE HOSTAGES were freed
when Israeli commandos flew
2,300 miles to Entebbe, landed
on the pretext that they were
about to submit to the hijack-
Interesting facts
Gasoline is used more ef-
ficiently at steady speeds which
makes freeway driving almost
twice as economical as driving
in city traffic.
It is estimated the average
American car burns about a
cup of gasoline for every six
minutes the car idles.
The Desert Act of 1877
allowed settlers to purchase up
to 640 acres of federally owned
arid land on condition the own-
er irrigated his holdings.

tme terrorists. out Z gana-
an soldiers, seven hijackers,
three hostages and one Israeli
soldier died in the shooting.
The psychiatrist, who served
as an adviser to the Ugandan
Health Service from 1969-71,
said Anin was his "main
patient."
Syphilis is recorded in Amin's
service record as a sergeant in
the British army, Ass-ael said,
and he also has a serious bone
disease which impairs his coot.
dination.
SEMI-HUMBLE MILLER
WASHINGTON /P) - Pro
golfer Johnny Miller says he
tries to remain semi-humble.
"If I started going around say-
ing how good I was, everything
would go wrong," says Miller.
Miller says he's no com-
paring himself to Jack Nick-
laus. He points out that Nick-
laus is 36-years old. Miller is
28, and says he compares him-
self with golfers of that age and
to the records older players
had when they were 28.

3rd HIT WEEK!
SHOWS TODAY & TOMORROW
AT 1-3-5-7-9
Theare honee4$264OPEN 12:45
"A darkly, chillins tale. Sarah Miles is a vibrant, but sex-
ually repressed vounq woman. Breathlakina beauty and
idyllic charm--Lovingly photographed."-N.Y. Daily News
Miles Kristofferson
a.I.
TODAY & TOMORROW at 4th
1:30-4:00-6:30-9:00
OPEN 1:15 INCREDIBLE
CLINT WEEK !
E ASTWOOD TODAY & TOMORROW at
1:30-4:30-6:30-9:00
, . -.OPEN 1:15
SORRY NO PASSES
The ighES SYIU RLASE
1:30-4:00-6:30-C9:001

THE FIRESIGN THEATRE inI
FIRESIGN FUNNIES
George Papoon wins the nominotion of "THE MARTIAN SPACE PARTY" I
in the crazy, off-the-wall, absurb film of the some name which stars the
whole Firesign group and assorted friends. Direct from Monster Island in
color!
"LOVE IS HARD TO GET" stars Peter Bergman as Nasi Goreng ("I'm I
Never Boring !") -A love-crazed Gorilla in search of kicks and cheap thrills.
"TV OR NOT TV" stars the team of (Phils) Proctor & Bergman as ClarkI
Gabel and Fred Flamme as they act as TV Guides through the inspired in-
sanity of contemporary viewing.
SUNDAY: Lubitsch's TROUBLE IN PARADISE (at 8-free)
CINEMA GUILD TONIGHT AT OLD ARCH. AUD.
7:30 & 9:30 Admission $1.25
ROBERT DE NIRO & HARVEY KEITEL in 1973
MARTIN SCORCESE'S
MEAN STREETS,
"A TRIUMPH OF PERSONAL FILMMAKING. THIS PICTURE IS SO ORIG-
INAL THAT SOME PEOPLE WILL BE DUMB-FOUNDED. It has a high-
geared charged emotional range that is dizzingly sensual. The whole movie
psychs you up to accept everything it shows you. And since the story deepens
as it goes along, BY THE END YOU'RE LIKELY TO BE OPENMOUTHED."
--Pauline Kael, The New Yorker.
CINEMA II TONITE of AUDITORIUM "A"
7:30 & 9:30 P.M. ANGELL HALL
Adm. $1.25

THE
OUTLAW
JOSEY
WALES
... an army of one.
Paaiis y® 'Cola lwDeluxe'
DistributedbyWaoner Bros0
\ Wiamer Communications Company

CHARLTON HESTON
HENRY FONDA
A UNNE[W'AL PC(U fi
TKNeCOLOfiPPNVSe Oss

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan