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July 08, 1976 - Image 11

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-07-08

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Thursday, July $, 1976

(HE MICHIGAN DAILY

Rage Eleven A

AT BRITISH OPEN
Unknowns tied for lead I

By The Associated Press
SOUTHPORT, England - Norio Suzuki, a
Japanese who hasn't played outside his home
country before, was the surprise co-leader as
the opening round of the 105th British Open
ended in heat and controversy yesterday.
Bracketed with Suzuki at 69 - three under
par for the 7,001-yard par-72 Royal Birkdale
course - were Serveriano Ballesteros, a 19-year-
old Spaniard on the brink of his military service,
and Christy O'Connor, an Irishman who plays
Ryder Cup for Britain.
TOGETHER THEY HELD at bay a strong
United States contingent that included Jack Nick-
laus, Hubert Green, Tom Weiskopf, Tommy Kite,
Hale Irwin and Tom Watson, the reigning Brit-
ish champion..
Of the Americans, only Kite, from Houston,
got within pitching distance of the leaders. He
turned in a two-under-par 70, just one stroke
behind the leading trio, and the next American
to follow him was Bill Brask, a dark horse
from Annapolis, Md., who has been concentrat-
ing on the European circuit. Brask finished
at 71.
On a day with temperatures in the mid-80's,

wilting greens and fairways were parched in the
country's longest drought for 104 years and tem-
pers started to heat up as well.
So scorched and dry was the course that
midway through the day the rough near the
first green caught fire, holding up play for 40
minutes while firemen put the blaze out. Near-
by spectator stands were hastily emptied.
NICKLAUS, THE 9-2 favorite, had for him
an insignificant round of 74, two over par, and
afterwards complained about the greens.
His complaint was echoed by Weiskopf, who
went round in 73 and said flatly "You lose all
confidence to putt, because you don't know what's
going to happen."
Nicklaus said the greens could have done with
more watering. "Each green was a different
pace and you couldn't tell what -the ball was
going to do," he said.
"I thought I putted pretty well but when
the ball caught a bit of dry stuff it would run
past or off."
Among the better U.S. scorers were: Hubert
Green and John Miller with 72s, Hale Irwin and
Alan Tapie with 74s and Arnold Palmer with
a 75.

AGING ARNOLD PALMER, still trying to break out of his
perpetual slump, blasts from a second hole trap at the
British Open yesterday. He shot a 75.

F.1 04 the kgals
Bo is back at work
Just a little more than six weeks after undergoing open-heart
surgery, Michigan football coach Bo Schembechler is back at work.
He's alswering mail, returning phone calls and gtnerally
trying to cftuh up on all the work he missed during his recovery.
le's not yet putting in any full days, however.
Schembechler claims he is the only coach on his staff who
is behind in preparation for the '76 season. But he's trying to
make up for that by stopping by his office once a day to pick
up films of spring practices and this fall's opponents.
To keep in shape, Schembechler walks six miles a day and
watches his weight carefully. He says the scar on his leg from the
operation is okay but that his chest muscles are still a bit sore.
Schembechler and his staff have about five weeks to prepare
for the opening of practice, August 23. Michigan opens the season
with a home game against Wisconsin Sept. 11.
U.S. back in Davis Cup
MONTE CARLO - The United States retracted yesterday its
decision to leave the Davis Cup, a tennis tournament that was for
many years the symbol of international team tennis supremacy
bit recently has degenerated into a bickering bunch of nations.
Fed up with the political bickering that has muddied this
tournament, the U.S. announced last week that it was walking
away from the tennis classic, which was initiated in 1900 by
American Dwight F. Davis.
At the same time, Great Britain and France also withdrew
from the 1977 tournament in sympathy with the U.S. action that
followed several nations refusing to play South Africa because
of that country's white supremacy government.
But, responding to "friendly pressure" from the 70 countries
represented in Monaco, the U.S. Davis Cup Committte did an
about-face yesterday, signing an International Lawn Tennis
resolution to consider 1977 as a "neutral year capable of saving
the existence of the competition."
Amaya wins again
BAASTAD, Sweden - former Michigan star Victor Amaya
continued his fine Gran Prix tennis season with a third-round upset
of 13th seeded Kim Warwick yesterday in the $100,000 Swedish
Open.
The 6-7 native of Holland, Mich. beat Australian Warwick 6-1,
2-6, 6-4. On Tuesday, Amaya beat Spaniard Manuel Santona 4-6,
6-4, 7-5.
Amaya's upset was one of many in the tourney. Other top
names eliminated: No. 2 seed Wojtek Fibak, No. 3 seed Mark
Edmondson and No. 6 seed Victory Pecci.
Ruthven replaces Andy
SAN FRANCISCO - Righthander Dick Ruthven of the Atlanta
Braves was named yesterday to the National League pitching staff
for the All-Star Game Tuesday in Philadelphia.
Ruthven, 10-7, replaces teammate Andy Messersmith, who
Tuesday aggravated a sensitive hamstring pull he suffered two
114 Prk,.

ENJOY
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