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July 07, 1976 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-07-07

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Poge Fourteen

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, July 7, 1976

.oeForee HEMCIGNDAL WdedaJuy7,17

Trial date expected to be
set tomorrow in VA case

(Continued from Page 3)
to Washtenaw and Wayne Coun-
ties;
--report weekly to a court of-
ficial;
-and designate an individual
close to each defendant to in-
form the court in case either
woman gave indication that she
might flee the country.
Both women posted $7,500 last
Wednesday and agreed to the
four conditions set by Pratt,
thereby gaining their release
from Washtenaw County Jail,
where they had been held since
June 16.
THE PROSECUTION contend-
ed that Pratt should refuse the
two defendants bail because the
women might flee to their native
Philippines. There is no extradi-

tion treaty between the U.S. and
the Philippines.
Burgess called the bail ruling
"fair and understandable," say-
ing, "the judge had to balance
the serious charges here against
the background of the two de-
fendants."
Six unrebutted character wit-
nesses testified on behalf of the
two nurses at the bail hearing.
"The most important factor to
the judge," observed Burgess,
'is that the women have been
prime suspects in this case for
awhile - they've been under
suspicion almost from the start,
and they have never tried to
flee the country."
O'BRIEN noted that the new
bail ruling was "a lot more
realistic than $500,000 - which

is as good as no bail at all."
The two women have named
individuals to serve as liasons
with the court. Narciso's land-
lord in Ypsilanti, Curtis Bran-
ham, and Lucita Alcantara, a
close friend of Perez, were
designated.
U.S. Assistant Attorney Rich-
ard Delonis, heading up the
prosecution team in the case,
could not be reached for com-
ment on the bail ruling.
THE DEFENSE attorneys
said their clients were in good
spirits. Perez is five months
pregnant and is expected to give
birth before the trial begins.
The attorneys added that the
women will spend time helping
to form their defense.

U' prof predicts a
future of geniuses
(Continued from Page 3) the same while chronologic
IF FAMILIES had fewer chil- age increases.
dren and spaced their births Here's an example of Zajonc
farther apart, the average IQ formula in action: a coup
in the U.S., currently 100, could both 24, have a baby. The p1
be raised five to ten points, ents each have a score of2
according to Zajonc. This would the baby's score is zero, ther
sigificantly increase the num- fore the total score for t
ber of people with IQ's of 130 family is 48. This figure,c
(gifted) or higher and decrease vided by the number of fami
the number of people with members (three), gives t
scores below 70 (retarded), he family an intellectual level
says. 16.
Zajonc also found that the If this same couple has
first-born children of small fam- other child two years later,
ilies had higher IQ's than their intellectual level falls. The p
siblings of the offspring of large ents now have a score of
families. "Only" children, how- each, the first child has a sco
ever, don't do as well, appar- of two, and the new baby
ently because of a lack of zero. These scores, added a
younger siblings to "teach," an divided by four, give the fami
experience proven to sharpen an intellectual level of 13
mental skills. With each succeeding child, t
A family's intellectual poten- level drops even more, parti
tial, according to Zajonc's for- larly if the children are born
mula, is based on three factors a small time span.
-number of family members,
their ages, and the intellectual Thus, says Z a j o n c, sm
level of each member. families with children wide
spaced are better for the int
A PERSON'S mental age is lectual development of ea
about equal to his chronological child since they are less of
age until the age of 35. This drain on the family's intell
intellectual level then remains tual level.

al
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the
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ig e : iy an
OFFICE HOURS
CIRCULATION - 764-0558
COMPLAINTS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS
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CLASSIFIED ADS - 764-0557
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DEADLINE 3 days in advance by 3 p.m.
Thursday at 3 p.m. for Tuesday's paper

7

j
1
i.'
u,

State OK's bill to
replace 'U' hospital

By PHILLIP BOKOVOY
A revenue-bonding bill ap-
proved Friday by the state
legislature will provide, the Uni-
versity with $144 million to re-
place the main unit of the Uni-
versity Hospital.
Louis Graff, director of Health
Service Relations, said the bill
"is the first of a succession of
steps in building a new hos-
pital."
BUT ACCORDING to Graff,
many things must be done be-
fore construction of the hospital
can begin - the site must be
chosen; an architect must be
consulted and hospital officials
must decide the types of fa-
cilities to be built.
Hospital Director Jeptha Dal-
ston said construction could
start "optimistically, in a year."
However, one hospital official
estimatedit would be "at leas
five years" bfore ground could
be broken for the new facility.
DALSTON said that the pres-
ent condition of the 50-year-old
hospital "hurts the reputation of

the medical school." He added
that construction of a new fa-
citity would be a boon to the
school's reputation.
Graff said the existing fa-
cility "is obsolete for continuing
progressive adult medical and
surgical care." The new plan
would replace the beds in the
old hospital and renovate the
Women's Hospital.
The committee studying pos-
sible sites for the new hospital
has not decided where the fa-
cility should be. Four locations
are under consideration: the
patient parking lot in the Medi-
cal Center, the Fuller Field
area, the present location of St.
Joseph's Hospital, and the area
between the Veterans Adminis-
tration Hospital and Hurin High
School.
Dalston said he expects con-
siderable controversy in the
selection of a site. He said that
pople may complan if the new
hospital is built in the already-
congested Medical Center area.
He added that others might say
that the proposed Fuller Road
locations are too far from cam-
pus.

UAW LOCAL 2001
MEMBERSHIP MEETING
WEDNESDAY, JULY 7
SCHORLING AUDITORIUM-SCHOOL OF EDUCATION-6 P.M.
" Election Committee report on Executive Officer and Bargaining
Committee Elections
* 'nstallation of Executive Officers and Bargaining Committee
" Election Committee Recommendations for Future Elections
" Nominations and Elections for Election and Education Committee
vacancies
* Nomination of 1 trustee
" Discussion of Contract Demano3
DAY CARE WILL BE PROVIDED FREE
Children's Community Center, 317 North 7th, Ann Arbor, from 5:30 P.M.

Crush
all smokes
dead out.

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