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July 07, 1976 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-07-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I.Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, July 7 1 976

Page len THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, July 7, 1976

Local team loses 'guts Frisbee'

PLO to release suspects
in Meloy murder incident

(Continued from Page 1)
world's answer to jousting.
The game is played by two
five-man t e a m s, alternating
throws across a 15-yard field.
Points are scored by the throw-
ing team when the receiver
drops or traps the Frisbee, and
by the receiving team when the
thrower tosses one short, wide
o- high.
THE AIR Aces of Rochester,
Michigan completed a success-
ful defense of the Julius Na-
chazel Trophy by defeating Ann
Arbor's H u m b I y Magnificant
Champions of the Universe in
Sunday's final match, 21-18,
21-15.
"I think the reason they beat
us was that we didn't out-think
them," said John Sappinton of
the "Humblies." "During the
(semifinal) match I could see a
glow way down deep in our
goys' eyes, but it didn't last
long."
One of the largest crowds was
for the tense semi-final match
between Houghton's Library
Bar, local favorites and cham-

pions in 1974, and the Humblies.
In the most exciting match of
the day, the Humblies prevail-
ed, 21-19, 16-21, 21-16.
THE TOURNAMENT d r e w
over 1,000 spectators who came
for a variety of reasons: fami-
lies on vacation, girlfriends and
wives of players, locals out to
cheer on the hometown boys,
and probably even a few who
just w a n t e d to watch the
bruises.
Unlike early dITs, players
were not required to take a
drink before every throw. Beer,
however, was abundant. When
tournament director John Davis
opened the beer concession at
noon on Sunday (state law pro-
hibits Sunday morning sales)
with a cry of "Gentlemen, start
your pop-top lids" a muffled
alcoholic roar resulted, and
even at the trophy presentation
someone k e p t yelling "Hey,
where's Peter Stroh?"
The trophy itself is a coffee
can soldered to a beer can, the
runner-up trophies are garish
creations of wood, marble and

stroh's beer cans, courtesy of
tournament s p o n s o r Stroh's
Brewing Co.
THE TOURNAMENT still re-
tains some of the tongue-in-
cheek flavor of its early years;
the teams are named "Minne-
sota Reefer Beaters" and "Cop-
per Harbor Herring Chokers,"
and there are calls from the PA
stand for "Lance Le Ha Ha."
But with the initiation of the
Rose Bowl championships, to
which the champion Air Aces
will travel courtesy of Wham-O,
and a national tournament ser-
ies, Frisbeeing is being gradual-
ly overrun with serious players.
Serious, that is, for as long as
the tournament lasts. Long af-
ter the trophy was awarded and
the crowds had gone home,
players enjoyed the afternoon
sun, "freestyling" the disc,
"hot-dogging," talking to the
concessionaires and re-telling
old Frisbee stories.
The only competition was a
friendly pickup game of "guts"
between players from several
teams-for a 12-pack of beer.

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(Continued from Paget)
A RED CROSS airplane flew
into Beirut from Cyprus yester-
day with six tons of supplies for
understaffed hospitals jammed
with war wounded and running
out of medicine. The plane un-
loaded and took off safely.
The DC6 was the first plane
to land at Beirut's airport since
June 7, when artillery shells
blasted holes in the terminal
and destroyed a Middle East
Airlines Boeing 707, killing the
pilot.
A Red Cross official said bar-
ring problems such as new
fighting nearby the plane would
return daily for several days
to restock Beirut's hospital.
Samuel Asper, a Baltimore
physician. -who heads the Am-
erican University Hospital, said
the situation there was "ter-
rible."
ASPER HAS refused several
U. S. Embassy recommends-
tions to evacuate. Beirut is in
its third week without water or
electricity.
A spokesman for the right-
wing Christians said their forces
mounted a strong counterattack
yesterday and beat back a left-
ist thrust into the northern
edge of the Christian heartland.
Guerrillas sliced into the en-
clave south of Tripoli on Mon-
day and claimed capture of
Chekka, the site of Lebanon's
largest cement factory on an
important deepwater bay on the
Mediterranean coast about 40
miles north of Beirut.
A spokesman for the leftist
central command said five oth-
er small villages in the area
including Hamat and Salata
also were overrun.
T H E P H A L A N G E
spokesman said yesterday,
"We regained control of Hamat,
a major artillery position, and
Salata, adjacent to the indus-
trial compound."
Christian forces also took the
town of Amyoun, six miles in-
land from Chekka, in another
counterattack, the Christians
said.
Palestinians claimed Syrian
troops were helping the Chris-
tian counter-attack in north-
ern Lebanon.
JOURNALISTS NEAR the
front said hundreds of Chris-
tian reinforcements in trucks
and buses, accompanied by
jeeps carrying antitank guns,
were seen headed north through
Batroun six miles south of
Chekka.

The leftist command said the
Chekka raid was a counterblow
for the two-week Christian as-
s mit on the Tal Zaatar Pales-
tinian camp in Christian-held
eastern Beirut.
A Phalange spokesman said
Tal Zaatarr was "in death ag-
ony. It is literally finished."
The camp's guns once control-
led key roads from Beirut to
the Christian heartland. Chris-
tians cantlred the neighboring
Jisr el-Basha camp last week.
WESTERN REPORTERS at
the dge of Tal Zastar said de-
foal - s file in at the center of
the camn were no longer firmg
bak with mortars or anti-air-
cr-Pt we-nons.
"Their resistance is fizzling
ot " the Phalange snokesman
said. - "Thev're fighting back
only with s-oradic vollevs of
auto-atic light weapon fire."
Moslem - controlled Beirut
radio said the leftist Moslem
leadership was studying new
proposals submitted by Syria
for the settlement of differences
between Syria and the Pales-
tinian guerrillas.
IT SAID THE proposals,
which were not disclosed, were
carried by Libyan Premier Ab-
dol Salam Jalloud, who met
with Arafat and Lebanese left-
ist leader Kamal Jumblatt in
Aley, east of Beirut.
The broadcast suggested the
Soviet Union had brought pres-
sure on Syria to restrain its ef-
forts to control the Palestinians.
It noted that Syrian Foreign
Minister Halim Khaddam is in
Moscow and Arafat and Jum-
blatt met with the Soviet am-
bassador to Lebanon, Alexan-
der Soldatov, before meeting
with Jalloud.
THE PALESTINE news ag-
ency WAFA charged that Syr-
ian authorities were arresting
members of the Palestine Lib-
eration Army (PLA) in Syria.
The PLA is under Arafat's com-
mand but is separate from his
guerrilla organizations.
WAFA said those detained
included one general two colo-
nels, three maojrs and three
captains.
Established in 1935 to me-
diate, arbitrate and settle un-
ion-management disputes over
fair labor practices, the Nation-
al Labor Relations Board was
declared Constitutional by the
Supreme Court in 1937.

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