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July 07, 1976 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-07-07

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Wednesday, July 7, 1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

President Reagan seeks Dem support

jobs bill
By AP and UPI
WASHINGTON - President
Ford yesterday vetoed a $3.95-
billion employment bill intended
to create or preserve hundreds
of thousands of jobs.
Democrats have vowed to en-
act the public service measure
over Ford's veto.
IN HIS STATEMENT to Con-
gress, Ford said: 'This bil will
not create lasting jobs but in-
stead will create more infla-
tion."
The President n o t e d that
members of Congress are now
home on a Fourth of July holi-
day and he urged their con-
stituents to let them know that
the federal government cannot
continue to go on a spending
spree.
U.S. Representative J a m e s
O'Hara (D-Mich.) calleddthe
veto "incredible" and said it
must be immediately overrid-
den by Congress.
O'HARA, A candidate for the
Senate seat being vacated by
Philip Hart, said the bill would
have provided some $92 million
for Michigan, including $24 mil-
lion to financially strapped De-
troit and Wayne County,
"The incredible veto of this
urgently n e e d e d legislation
must be overridden by Congress
as soon as it returns later this
month," O'Hara said.
The veto was Ford's third in
four days and the 52nd of his
presidency.
LAST FRIDAY Ford vetoed a
$3.3 billion military construction
bill. On Saturday he turned
down a measure which would
have increased the western
states' share of royalties from
oil and coal leasing on public
lands.
"We are going to make this
bill law, either with the Presi-
dent's signature or over his
veto," House Majority Leader
Thomas P. O'Neill Jr. said June
23, one day after the House
gave it final approval.
O'Neill said the bill would
provide 350,000 jobs and author-
ize $3.95 billion to finance the
construction of local facilities
such as municipal offices, court-
houses, libraries, water and
sewer lines, streets and other
projects.
THE MEASURE passed the
House by 328 to 83, substantially
more than the two-thirds needed
to over-ride a veto. The Senate
approved the measure 70 to 25,
also enough to override a veto.
"We are following through
with the promise of the Demo-
cratic congressional leadership
to provide jobs," O'Neill said at
the time.
Ford vetoed a similar bill last
February. It was a larger meas-
ure, providing $6.2 billion for
public works employment. The
House over-rode that veto, but
the Senate sustained Ford by
three votes.
That bill was designed to cre-
ate 600,000 jobs. Ford called it
"little more than election-year
pork barrel" and said it had "so
many deficiencies and undesir-
able provisions that it would do
more harm than good."
In the new bill, one part
would authorize $2 billion in
grants through Sept. 30, 1977,
to state and local governments
for public works projects that
can be started within 90 days.
Meadow Beauty is an attract-
ive perennial flower of North
America which stands 1-2 feet
high.

WASHINGTON (P) - Ron-
aId Reagan appealed last night
for support from Democrats, as-
serting that the Democratic par-
ty had been "taken over by elit-
ists who believed only they
could plan properly the lives of
the people."
Reagan attacked President
Ford, his rival for the GOP
presidential nomination, as well
as Democratic candidate Jim-
my Carter.
HE DECLARED that the fed-
eral government, and particu-
larly Congress, have been dom-
inated by "a philosophy that
works against the values of the
family and the values that were
so basic to the building of this
country."
In a speech prepared for a
national campaign telecast, the
former California governor said
that through inflation "the big
spenders in Washington have
brought us to the place where

older Americans are slowly -
but surely -- being pushed to
the wall."
Making his pitch to Demo-
crats, Reagan, himself a for-
mer Democrat, said:
"MILLIONS OF you have de-
cided neither party faithfully
represents what you believe.
The answer is for all of us to
vote for our values and not for
labels next November."
The 30-minute speech, carried
on the ABC television network,
cost the Reagan campaign ap-
proximately $80,000 to $85,000
for production and air time, a
Reagan aide in Los Angeles
said.
It was the Republican candi-
date's third national campaign
speech on television. The first,
also 30 minutes, helped bring
his then - depleted campaign
treasury out of trouble last
March and April. A second,
five minute speech followed.

REAGAN MENTIONED nei-
ther of the other candidates by
name. But in an apparent ref-
erence to Ford, Reagan said in
his Tuesday night talk:
"There are those who want
to approach the nation's prob-
lems on a politics as usual ba-
sis. A little government help
here, a shrewd political move
there. A little special treatment
to thos group or that group. A
political 'strategy' of one kind
or another."
"But we are not going to get
out of the mess we are in sim-
ply by doing the same old
things in a new way," said Rea-
gan.
"AND THEN there are those
whose approach to government
combines soothing rhetoric,
pleasant smiles and reorganiza-
tion gimmicks," he said in an
apparent reference to Carter,
the former Georgia governor
and probable Democratic nomi-

nee.
"Well, you can't get to the
heart of an issue by being
vague about it," Reagan said.
"You don't fix bad policies by
rearranging or replacing one
bureaucrat with another. You
have to renlace bad ideas with
good ideas."
Reagan aides made clear be-
fore the speech that the former
governor was referring to Ford
and Carter.
"YOU'D HAVE to assume
he's talking about the other peo-
ple in the race and they're the
only two other people in the
race," said spokesman Jim
Lake.
Construction of Iowa's capitol
started in 1873 and it was op-
ened for its first legislative
session in 1884. Interior wall
decorations incl'nde 29 kinds of
marble and wood paneling.

/v

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