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July 03, 1976 - Image 10

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-07-03

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Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, July 3, 1976

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UNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF CHRIST
Presently Meeting at
YM-YWCA, S30 S. Fifth
David Graf, Minister
Students Welcome
For information or transpor-
tion: 663-3233 or 662-2494.
10:00 am.-Sunday Worship.
UNIVERSITY REFORMED
CHURCH, 1001 E. Huren
Calvin Malefyt, Alan Rice,
Ministers
10:00 a.m.-Morning Worship]
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN
CHAPEL (LCMS)
1511 Washtenaw Ave. 463-5560
Alfred '. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday morning worship at
9:30.
Sunday Bible study at 10:45.
-i A
1:30-4:00 6 30 9:00
OPEN 1:15
015 C IORORttP NTS
A UNiVif R. P 5 TUR0G I '
TODAY at 1-3-5-7 9
OPEN 1 45
* *
L]' coca
AVO EMBASSY PCTURES RELEASE
GO GET 'EM, CLINT!
SHOWS TODAY At
1 30-4 :00-6:30 -9:00 1
OPEN 1.15
From Warner Bras

ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
331 Thompson-463-9557
Weekend Masses:
Saturday-5 p.m., 11:30 p.m.
Sunday -- 7:45 a.m., 9 a.m.,
10:30 a.m., noon, and S p.m.
(plus 9:30 a.m. North Campus).
* *f *
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw
Sunday Service and Sunday
School-10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Testimony Meet-
ing-1:00 p.m.
Child Care-Sunday, under 2
years.
Midweek Informal Worship.
Reading Room-306 E. Liber-
ty, 10-5 Monday through Satur-
day; closed Sundays.
ANN ARBOR CHURCH
OF CHIRIST
530 W. Stadium Blvd.
(one block west of
U of M Stadium)
Bible Study - Sunday, 9:30
a .ni-Wednesday, 7:30 pim.
Worship-Sunday, 10:30 a.m.
and 6:00 pi.
Need Transportation? C a 1
662-9929.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CIURCH
1432 Washtenaw-662-4466
Worship - Sunday, 9:30 and
11:00 a.m.
Try
Daily
C lassifieds.

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
State at Huron and Washington
Worship Services:
1:30 a.m.-Communion Service
-Chapel.
9:30 and 11:00 a m.-Worship
Service-Sanctuary.
9:30 and 11:00 a.m. -Church
School.
Worship Services are broad-'
cast over WNRS-AM (1290) each
Sunday from 11:00-12:00 noon.
UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
409 S. Division.
M. Robert Fraser, Pastor
Church Scsool-9:4S a.m.
Morning Worship-11:00 a-in,
Evening Worship-7:00 p.m.
CAMPUS CHAPELI
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
Pastor: Don Postema
10:00 a.m.-Morning Worship.
6:00 p.m.-Evening Service.
Marchienne Rienstra will he a
guest speaker at both services.
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH (ALC-LCA)
(Formerly Lutheran Student
Chapel)
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801 S. Forest Ave. at Hill St.
Sunday Service at 9:30 n.m.
Younig Adult meals-Sunday,
12:30 p.m. Wednesday, 6:00 p.m.
($1.00).
Study and discussion-
11:00 a.m. S u n d a y: Adult
study.
12:00-1:00 Thursday: Thursday
Forum (lunch, $1.25).
Chancel C h o i r - 7:00-8:30
Thursday.
For more information about
the Young Adult Program call
Jo Ann Staebler at the church,
662-4466.

FosrdReagan, Carter all
k capital punishent
By AP and tI
President Ford and the two chief rivals for his job, Ronald
Reagan and Jimmy Carter, all believe the death penalty has
its place in the American criminal justice system.
Ford and the Democratic nominee-apparent, Carter, both
have said capital punishment is an appropriate sanction for
certain crimes.
REAGAN, WHILE GOVERNOR of California, and Carter,
while governor of Georgia, each signed legislation which rein-
stated the death penalty in their states several years ago. The
court upheld the Georgia law in its decision yesterday.
Ford told a peace officers' convention in California less
than six weeks ago that he favors the death penalty under cer-
tain circumstances in cases involving sabotage, murder, espionage
and treason.
"The harsh fact is that passivity and permissiveness invite
crime and the certainty of punishment prevents crime, and I
mean positive swift and just punishment," Ford said.
A PREVIOUS SUPREME COURT decision had struck dowa
state capital punishment laws but provided for specific circum-
stances under which the death penalty could be legislated
Carter signed a new Georgia capital punishment measure isis
law in March 1973. The new law established a series of exten
ating circumstances which could result in capital punishment a
one or more of them were present in a crime, including kid
naping' or factors which make a crime particularly heinous.
In 1975, Carter praised the Georgia law by saying it "re
silts in making a person ineligible for parole rather than a
immediate execution.'
CARTER, WHILE PRAISING the law's limitation on parole
said he doubted its possible deterrent effects.
Reagan, by contrast, said in a campaign statement this tear
that "capital punishment serves as a deterrent to crime. Thotiug
it saddens me that we need it, I am convinced that we do "
As governor in 1967, Reagan refused to halt the last exe
tion in Califtirnia's San Quentin gas chamber, that of a maii
convicted of shooting a police officer. One of the pirtese:
who stood outside San Quentin that day is California's pre-.
Gov. Edmund "Jerry" Brown, Carter's last rival far the lei
cratic nomination.
WHEN REAGAN SIGNED a new death penalty bill 1,
California in 1973, Reagan said "maybe we should review ans
see if there aren't even more humane methods now-the smile
shot of transquilizer."
Meanwhile, back in

AN INTRODUCTION
TO THE
Transcendental
Meditation (TM)
Program
TUESDAY, JULY 6
at 2:00 and 7:30 p.m.
Multipurpose Room-UGLI
STUDENTS INTERNATIONAL founded by
MEDITATION SOCIETY Maharishi Mahesh Yoi
for more information call 761-8255
1976 World Plan Executive Council-U.S. All rights reserved
Transcendental Meditation and TM(R iare service marks of
WPEC-U ,S, a non-profit educational or anization.

+ .

LY

f

N; I

ADVERTISING- 1

America's
( Cot)tnt ied from Page 6)
Sunday at 2 o'clock, Ann Ar-
bor steeples will join in a sim-
ultaneous nationwide bell-ring-
ing to commemorate the origi-
nal peal of the Liberty Bell in
Philadelphia precisely 200
years before. They will be led
by the massive 12-ton bronze
bell in the University's Burton
Memorial Tower.
The University. carillon will
follow with an hour-long re-
cital of American music, high-
lighted by a two-man rendition
of John Philip Sousa's "Stars
and Stripes Forever."
At 3:30, the focus of the cele-
bration will shift back to
Buhr Park; there, athletic de-
monstrations will compete with
a "Speaker's Corner" sponsor-
ed by the League of Women
Voters. And if you're ready for
some eats by then, a commun-
ity barbecue fire will be lit.
From 5:30 to 7:30 you can
swing and shimmy on the tennis
courts to a 16-piece "big band"
type orchestra. Then at 8
o'clock the Ann Arbor Civic
Band will replace them for a
strictly sit-down concert.
Toward dusk, if the weather
permits, there will be a hot-air
balloon ascension. Also, Denny
Loomis - a local magician and
escapeartist -- will attempt to
get out of a straitjacket while
hanging upside-down from a
hovering helicopter.
Finally, at 10, the Ann Ar-
bor Jaycees will haul out their

heartlandl
niuch-touted fireworks.
A H, TO SIT out on the gi.:
under the whisper of leaves,. a
icy drink cool in the palm of the
hand. watching the night sk
blossom into flame! Gent)
swatting mosquitoes and talk
ing with a few friends .
there's something marvelous
about fireworks.
From one point of view of
coarse, it all seems a hitl,
childish and somewhat futile
To the alienated, the socialts
frustrated, ice cream and fire-
works are merely the superfic-
ial trappings of a callous, de.
caying society.
Tihe Bicentennial message
doesn't answer their questions
But in some small way it seem
to answer a real, genuine need
among a number of Midwest
erners.
Hereabouts people are paint
to do some relaxing, lying back
and thinking. Thev're going t
dance, and the kids are goint
to wave their handfuls of little
flags while the firecrackers go
off around them.
And it really won't matter
that we don't have Washing-
ton's dentures or Independence
Hall.
So what if this isn't the heart
of the Union? This is its broad,
flat belly - and we Midwest-
erners, too, know something
about America, something that
has nothing to do with battle-
fields or documents. We, too.
belong, .

DOESN'T COST
IT PAYS!
YOU'RE READING THIS, AREN'T YOU

Disply-764-0554

Class

if eds-764-557

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