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July 02, 1976 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-07-02

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, July 2, 1976

Poge Five

Friday, July 2, 1976 THE MICHIGAN DAILY 'age Five

Hijackers free more
KAMPALA, Uganda (AP) - that they seized Sunday over
Pro-Palestinian hijackers freed Greece. Those still held include
101 more hostages but kept 110 98 passengers - most of them
prisoner at Entebbe airport yes- Israeli or with dual nationali-
terday as Israel agreed to ne- ties, presumably some Ameri-
gotiate release of extremists can Jews - and 12 members
held in Israeli jails, of the crew.
The hijackers extended a
Thursday morning deadline for An Air France plane took the
compliance with their demands 101 hostages freed yesterday,
to 8 am. EDT Sanday. most of them French, to Paris.
On Wednesday, 47 children, el-
THE HIJACKERS have threat- derly and sick captives were
ened to execute the hostages also freed and flown to the
and blow up the French plane French capital.
- - - - - - - --- - - - - -
ampaign abuse charges
may prompt Austin audit

By CHRIS PARKS
LANSING (UPI) - A spokes-
man for Secretary of State
Richard Austin's U.S. Senate
campaign said Austin may hire
a private accountant to go over
his hooks to clear up claims of
campaign financing abuses.
It has been alleged that sec-
retary of state branch office
managers, who are named by
Austin, were coerced into mak-
ing contributions to his cam-
paign.
JERRY BLOCKER, Austin's
press secretary, said yesterday
a decision will be forthcoming-
probably by the end of the week
-on whether an outside firm
should be hired.
Blocker said an outside firm
will be brought in if it appears
that audits Austin requested
last week from tht federal and
state agencies will not be im-
mediately forthcoming.
He did not say, however, who
would pay for the audit and
refused to reveal whether it
would be done at state expense.
He said that information will be
released only when audit itself

is announced.
'This information on Austin's
campaign fund will come out
in public when we want it to
come out in public," he said.
HE PLEDGED the audit would
be ready "well in advance of
the Aug. 3 primary," but de-
clined to say precisely what
that meant. The primary is now
a month away.
Blocker said the audit Austin
is considering would cover "any-
thing that is in question" -
including all campaign funds -
and the books of the Branch
Managers Association. He said
it would be expected to deal
directly with the question of
whether branch managers were
reanired, at the threat of losing
their jobs, to contribute to the
Austin campaign.
Meanwhile, Gov. William Mil-
liken said Thursday it is time
to terminate the patronage sys-
tem under which branch office
managers are selecttd.
Ile said it was not necessarily
unethical for Austin to accept
branch managers' contributions,
however.

hostages
The identities of the dynamite
and machine gun-carrying hi-
jackers remained shadowy, but
diplomats said they included
three separate groups - three
Palestinians, presumably Arab,
two non-Palestinian Arabs and
two Germans. The Arabs seem-
ed to be in charge, they said.
THE HIJACKERS described
themselves as members of the
Popular Front for the Libera-
tion of Palestine, a radical
group opposed to any settle-
ment with Israel.
The guerrillas said they freed
the new batch of hostages and
extended the deadline as a ges-
ture of goodwill at the request
of Uganda President Idi Amis.
The government - run Uganda
Radio reported that French Am-
bassador Pierre Renard told
Amin that Israel, in a reversal
of its traditional policy of not
dealing with extremists, was
ready tormeet the demands, at
least part way. It quoted Re-
nard as saying Israel would
release some of the 40 jailed
extremists whose freedom was
demanded by the hijackers.
THE RADIO) SAID French
President Valery Giscard dEs-
taing suggested in a message to
Amin that negotiations could be
conducted through the United
Nations. Giscard said U.N. Sec-
retary-General Kurt Waldheim
was informed of the French
suggestion. Waldheim is travel-
ing in Africa
Amin replied that the crisis
could be solved even before
Sundayif Israel released its pri-
soners. He denied he was coop-
erating with the guerrillas and
said he only wanted the safety
of all hostages.
The Israeli government said
in Tel Aviv it had authorized
Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin
to bargain with the guerrillas.
But Israeli Transport Minister
Gad Yaacobi told the state ra-
dio the decision did not mean
Israel would meet all conditions
of the hijackers.

LANSING (UPI) - A state
Appeals Court panel has pro-
mised to rule "soon" on a suit
challenging petitions filed by
conservation groups to put a
ban on throwaway bottles on
the Novembebr ballot.
The three-judge panel heard
oral orguments from both sides
in the case yesterday. -
AN IMMEDIATE appeal to
the state Supreme Court is ex-
pected regardless of the Ap-
peals Court decision. Propon-
ents of the bottle ban are con-
cerned that the measure will
be tied up in court so long as
to prevent it from getting on
the ballot this year.
The Michigan United Conser-
vation Clubst(MUCC) has filed
petitions with the state Board
of Canvassers with well over
the number of signatures re-
quired for a place on the bal-
lot for the bottle ban.
However, a mixed industry
and labor group filed suit chal-
lenging the petitions on two ma-
jor grounds - that they were
filed too late and that the title
on the petitions was mislead-
ing.
LANSING lawyer Thomas
Downs argued yesterday that

Court panel to rule soon on
bottle petition chall1enge

Ay 25 should hase been the
deadline for filing petitions.
Petitions were not filed until
last month.
MUC' officials say there is
no ltatly binding deadline for
the -etitions to be filed.
Downs also argued the title
on the netitions was misleading
because it identified the propos-
al as one requiring deposits on
bottles rather than one banning
throwaway bottles.
IN FACT. the proposed mea-
sure does both.
Downs was representing Wil-
liam Marshall, head of the
state AFL - CIO, other labor
leaders snd a nmber of indi-
viduals from the bottle and can
inshnstrv.
Peter Steketee of Grand
Rapids "ru ed for the MUCC
and a reoresentative of Attor-
ney General Frank Kelley ar-
gued for the MUCC position on
behalf of the Board of Canvass-
ers. The suit seeks to bar the
Board of Cnvassers from cer-
tifving the MUCC petitions.
The MUCC is pushing the
bottle ban as a meanas of re-
ducing litter. Industry and la-
bor groauns, however, claim it
would cost the state jobs.

State drunk law amended

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COUPON EXPIRES JULY 8, 1976

LANSING (UPI) - Amend-
ments to the state's 1974 law
decriminalizing public intoxica-
tion have received final approv-
al in the House, over objections
that Senate changes weakened
the hand of police in dealing
with dangerous persons.
The bill cleared the House 62-
39.
THE INTENT of the measure
us to clear up technical problems
with the Substance Abuse As-
sistance Act of 1974 under which
persons "incapacitated" from
too much drink, lustead of being
arrested, would be taken to
clinics for treatment.
The act has not yet taken
effect, although several pilot
programs based on it are in
operation.
Persons taken to these clinics
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KKT ALLOY
RACING PEDALS
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TQtE CLIPS
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$2.50
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662-6986

may not be detained after they
sober up or for more than 72
hours in any event. Lawmakers
familiar with the pilot programs
say they have been assured no
one is locked up against their
will.
THE BILL makes changes in
the definition of incapacitated,
increases the number of places
authorized to receive and treat
provides that police officers
these people, and specifically
"assisting" incapacitated per-
sons may search them for

weapons.
This last amendment generat-
ed the most controversy in the
House yesterday.
As it passed the Senate, the
bill allows officers to search
persons "in" their immediate
surroundings instead of search-
ing persons "and" their im-
mediate surroundings.
Although the difference seems
small, lawmakers said the Sen-
ate wording greatly restricts
the right of officers to search
anything other than the inca-
pacitated person's body.

* Did You Sign a Decertification Card and are Having Second Thoughts?
* Were You Misled Into Signing One?
0 Were You Encouraged In Any Way by a Supervisor To Sign One?
* Did Your Supervisor Pass Along Any Information To You About Signing a
Decert. Card?
CALL THE LOCAL UNION OFFICE AFTER 12 NOON
994=808

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