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June 22, 1976 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-06-22

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Page Ten

THE MICHIGANt DAILY

Tuesday, June 22, 1976

..... Te.HEMCIGNDIL uedy. Jn.2,17

Broderick: Law and order

Unity caucuswins
cleica lo ost

C7n'niiLued fraum iP re i'e
small or no police department.)
oontracting a certain amount
of sheriff's patrol cars for their
area for a specified amount of
money,
"TAXPAYERS should not
have to pay extra for police
protection they are already en-
titled to," Broderick said. "A
possible soution to this would
be to use federal funds for this
purpose.
He plans to increase protec-
tion for outlying areas by cut-
ting down on "people behind
the desk" including command
officers.
"This (cutting down on desk
personnel) was one of Postill's
election claims and there are
now more command officers
than ever before," he con-

tends.
"There is (also) a need for
more extensive professional-
ism," Broderick stated, "And it
starts with the basic essentials,
like showing courtesy and re-
sponding to calls as soon as pos-
sible."
A MAJOR ISSUE of Bro-
derick's campaign is re-involve-
ment in the Washtenaw Area
Narcotics Team (WANT), a
cooperative squad of law en-
forcement officers (including
members from Ann Arbor, Yp-
silanti, and the Michigan State
Police) which has been com-
bating drug traffic in the coun-
ty. The sheriff's department
was previously a part of the
WANT squad until Postill re-
moved its personnel.
"Drugs are coming in (to

the ann arbor film cooperative
AKIRA KUROSAWA'S 1954
TIHE SEVEN SAMURAI
'h bhu .st a ,om)e tiiik. the best film that Kurosawa ever
nsie Kirsosw u id siiper-iwerti telephoto enses, Causiii
iouos, o Is tli ason tshe sceewo, osderiting is 'useiiwtha
vior tontale svsto That of the Soviet silent films. A compelling
and very real epic thilt is not onty one of the best films ever
made in J tlan, bt anywiere in the world. Th is sa rare chance
to sv the init., tiree-hour-and-a-half hour version, usually
unahow ousisde o Japan. All threee-hours-and-a-htlf are inter-
estimi, so don'sto hrscired off. Toshiro Mifune. Japanes, English
subtlitles.
7:30 only AUD. A, ANGELL HALL $1.25

Washtenaw c o u n t y) from
Wayne County and it's not by
parachute," Broderick said,
"With the WANT squad we can
do something about it."
The WANT squad involve-
ment would also be a part of
Broderick's plan to better re-
lations between other area po-
lice agencies and the sheriff's
department. "There has been
some animosity between the
various (local) police depart-
ments," he said, "I think we
can re-establish cooperation
(between them)."
B R O D E R I C K realizes
that it will "take a lot of hard
work to unseat the incumbent"
but "running for sheriff has
been at the back of my mind
since I left the department.
I've seen things I know I can
do better. Money can be spent
better," he added.
Mass.-
employes
(Continued from Page 1)
but there were a few trouble
spots."
The effects of the strike
varied around the state yester-
day with attendance reports
ranging from "sparse" to full
employment. Many desks at
state offices were empty, but
officials reported most prison
guards came to work,
Most Registry of Motor Ve-
hicles offices were ordered
closed at. midmorning. At the
Hyannis office, a caller said his
license expired today and asked
what he should do.
"Don't drive until the strike is
over," he was told.
SHORT or LONG
HAIRSTYLES TO PLEASEj
DASCOLA
STYLISTS
ARBORLAND-971-9975
MAPLE VILLAGE-761-2733
E. LIBERTY-668-9329
E. UNIVERSITY-662-0354

{Continued frio P-e :N
tion - everyone had strong be-
liefs in this election, it's just
that some beliefs were based on
false premises."
Sue Ellen Hansen, elected
CDU candidate for financial-sec-
retary, indicated that personali-
ties rather than issues received
undue focus in the campaign and
overly influenced election re-
sults.
"What happened in this elec-
tion was a cult of personality
was developed. If people had
voted positions, rather than on
the basis of personalities - it
would have been a far better
election," said Hansen.
AS FOR THE impending de-
certification drive, Hansen said,
"I think that will probably be
the primary concern of the lo-
cal. I would hope each elected
official would be concerned
with that."
Regarding the effectiveness of
split union leadership in com-
batting the de-certification drive
Hansen stated: "I think the re-
maining incumbents will work
together and be effective. As for

the executive board as a whole-
time will tell."
Hansen also said the union
would "literally have to prove
its effectiveness and usefulness
to the membership" if it wanted
to turn back the de-certification
effort.
HANSEN ADDED, "f feel the
local can prove itself to the
membership and regain the con
fidence of the membership."
Clericals now involved in the
de-certification drive have col
lected some 1,029 signatures in
their effort to abolish local 2001
This number more than fulfills
the minimum requirement of
signatures required by the
Michigan Employment Relations
Commission.
MERC has scheduled a hear
ing for Aug. 6 to discuss the
possibility of a de-certificatiOll
election. It has yet to be deter
mined whether the de-certifica
tion effort will affect the status
of the local as a legitimated
bargaining agent for University
clericals when their present coo
tract with the University expire>
Aug. 31.

10 killed as new riots
erupt in South Africa

(Continued from Page 1)
townships. In Mabopane, riot-
ers destroyed three buses and
two trucks, set afire or stoned
20 buses and six cars and
burned down a bush shed, he
said.
In black townships around
Johannesburg municipal build-
ings were attacked, beerhalls
burned and looted and vehicles,
stoned, Kruger said.
HE ALSO confirmed a po-
lice report that rioters from
Mabopane stormeda nearby
white farm, injured farmer Na-

than Liebenzohn, burned down
the farmhouse and killed and
maimed cattle.
"I have been in a war, but
I did not think I would survive
this," Liebenzohn said. "Why
they didn't kill us God ony
knows."
In central Johannesburg az
axe - wielding black, yelliig
"Freedom for Africa," ran the
length of a city block atid
struck down three whites be-
fore being stopped by a shot
fired by a traffic policeman
One of the wounded was a

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