100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 17, 1976 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-06-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Thursday, June 17, 197+6

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ruge Seven

Thursday, June 17, 1976 THE MiCHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

Goyernment may ask U.S. Ambassador murdered in Beirut
(Continued from Page ) part of the way but turned back. There was no immediate ch
5-yr. im on busing no idea who was responsible for Questioned repeatedly by news- to the motive behind the killing
the murders. He said there were men about why and where the
_ - - _- _ s _ _ __ - FREELANCE eunmen maker

ue
gs.
ngy

(Continued from Page 3)
would not any longer. be re-
quired except in extraordinary
circumstances."
The legislative proposal has
not been presented to Ford yet,
he added.
The attorney general said that
"there's no basic difference"
between himself and the Presi-
dent on the school desegrega-
tion issue. But in response to
questions, he indicated disagree-
msents with Ford on two points.
LEVI SAID he believes segre-
gated private schools are il-
tegal, d e s p i t e Ford's recent
statement that private schoots
receiving no f e d e r a t funds
should be allowed to exclude
blacks.
Levi noted that the Justice
Iuepartment has argued in the
Supreme Court that segregated
private schools violate a 19th
century law banning racial dis-
crimination in the making of
contracts.
"That is my position as to the
lw," he said. He added that tse

believes Ford was expressing a
personal view rather than a
legal opinion.
LEVI ALSO said he betieves
federal judges have tried to fol-
low the 1974 law requiring that
busing be imposed only as a
last resort. Ford has said he
believes the courts have not
adhered to that law.
Although endorsing busing as
a last-resort tool of desegrega- .
tion, Levi said the courts have
not resolved how long busing
should be continued or how
broadly it should be imposed in
a city.
There is a basicdquestion
whether "it is the duty of a
federal court to compel com-
plete integration of schools" to
correct the illegal segregation
caused by official government
acts, he added.
EVEN WITHOUT official seg-
regation, he continued, there is
bound to be some concentration
of racial and ethnic groups in
neighborhood enclaves.

no known threats and no one
was claiming responsibility for
the murders.
Ford went before reporters in
the White House briefing room
to read his statement on the
deaths personally. He said the
"United States will not be de-
terred from its search for peace
by these murders."
He said Secretary of State
Henry Kissinger has been or-
dered "to continue our inten-
sive efforts" to help find a solu-
tion to the Lebanese civil war.
The President said "all appro-
priate resources of the United
States" will be used to name
the killers or the group respon-
sible for the deaths.
KISSINGER has also been or-
dered to contact Middle Fast
governments and leaders of the
various Lebanese factions "to
help identify the murderers and
to see that they are brought to
justice," Ford said.
The U.S. Embassy spokesman
in. Beirut said a guard car carry-
ing Lebanese security men fol-
lowed the ambassador's car

guard car turned back, the
spokesman refused to anSwer on
security grounds. He said there
was "nothing abnormal" about
the guard car turning back.
FUNSETH said in Washington
the procedure apparently was
part of an arrangement with the
Moslems who control west Bei-
rut, implying they had taken
it upon themselves to deliver
Meloy safely to the Christian
side.
Beirut Moslems are reluctant
to venture into Christian terri-
tory and vice versa because of
the many sectarian killings dur-
ing the 14-month civil war.

a profit from Beirut's disorders
have pulled off numerous at-
tacks, robberies and abductions
in recent months.
A U.S. Army colonel stationed
in Turkey was kidnaped for
about a month last summer and
two U.S. information service
staff menibers were abducted
Oct. 22 and held for more than
three months. All three were
released unharmed. 'heir cap-
tors were never officially iden-
tified thouigh they were widely
reported to be guerrillas from
the Poular Front for the Libera-
tion of Palestine and their Leb-
anese allies.

W ENDS TON IGHT-
"Mother, Jugs & Speed"
reton in odern te q' (PG) Shown to 7:00 only
TOMORROW-"99 7 10% PURE MAGIC"
-N.Y. Times

Marcovitz can't save Ark show

(Continued from Page 6)
every word, she suddenly ap-
peared out of nowhere, looking
like a cross between a Jewish
mother 'and Lina Wertmuller;
with a curly-top wig, white
rhinestone-edged sun glasses,
matching pumps and a bulky
fur coat, and demanded that
Owen stop the show. "I'm not
eaving until my daughter comes
home," she announced. Her im-
personation was so convincing
many took her to be the real
tiing.
This is Ceil Dubin, the familiar
Jewish mother and one of Mar-
covitz's most successful char-
acters. When she's not berating
her son Herschel for rejecting
his college education and leav-
ug his dirty socks under the
ted or for ripping the plastic
(ipcovers off the living room
furniture, Ceil spends her time
at the "fat ladies gym," or be-
inoaning the fact that her
daughter is a "marijuana jun-
kie." Her daughter, Esmerelda
Sunshine, snorts the ashes of her
cremated boyfriend and writes
nuttdane songs about getting her
-ad together.
THESE WERE two of the
haracters ventured forth from
%larcovitz's lunatic gallery, who,
idiotic as they may be, point up
lie insanity which exists to a
certain extent in all our lives.
tarcovitz feels it's important
a get people in touch with that
usanity, and to not only realize
Se absurdities which we all go
1trough, but to accept them as
ell.
The characters point out life's

inanities with graphic exaggera-
tion, but even when Marcovitz is
just being herself, the message
comes through with equal clar-
ity. After finishing her first
number, "Herschel, You're on
Your Own," an angry diatribe
from Ceil, Diana removed her
costume to reveal wildly colored
trousers she referred to as "pea-
cock pants," and took off her
brillo-pad wig to display an even
wilder thatch of curly hair.
WHAT MAKES her art so
compelling is that bizarre as it
seems, it is ultimately based
upon realities. For instance,
Ceil's rhinestone glasses are
actually sold in the New York
area specifically for Bar Mitz-
vahs. Ceil and Esmerelda are
losers, obviously, but they only
point out the subtler ways in
which other women are condi-
tioned to be losers. And they are
not one-dimentional caricatures;
they hover on the edge of
pathos.
This was one of Marcovitz's

first appearances in a theater.
Prior to this she's played at
clubs to audiences averaging
about forty people. She was not
only pleased with how her act
came across at Power, but feels
this performance marks a turn-
ing point in her career.
"Everyone was under tremen-
dous pressure," she said in an
interview on Monday, "because
the Ark has meant a lot to us
and we all wanted to do a good
job . . . I was running around
like a drag queen . . . I drove
everybody nuts because I rep-
resented what was really hap-
pening."
"The Ark is an airport for the
mind," she continued. "It's a
group of very accepting people,
like a family that you don't
know." Clearly, this concert, to-
gether with Marcovitz's new
record album, signals the be-
ginning of a successful career,
but the spirit of the precocious
adolescent playing before her
friends will remain part of her
style.

"The Story of 0" (X)
SHOWN AT 7:00 & 9:00
OPEN 6:45

I

TONIGHT!
THE ROLLING STONES
GIMME SHELTER
David and Albert Mavsles, Charlotte Zwerin, 1970)
AUD. A-7:15 & 9
This fim captur"s the visceral excitment of the Roing Stones
and the demonic manetism of Mick Ja ger. The Maysles
brothers employ incredibly resourceful camera work and ener-
etic 6-track recording to focus on the tragedy of Altamont and
the events leading up to it. IKE AND TINA TURNER, JEFFER-
SON AIRPLANE.
Extra Sound Eauipment AUD. A-7:15 & 9 $1.25
WATCH FOR OUR OTHER SUMMER ROCK FEST. FILMS

Theatre Company of Ann Arbor, Inc.
presents
BITCI1 Y~OU CRAZrY"
a kaleidoscope of women in Americon institutions
JUNE 18, 19 and June 25, 26, 27
at SCHORLING AUDITORIUM
N THE U OF M SCHOOL OF EDUCATION BLDG.
TICKETS $2.00 CURTAIN 8:00 P.M.

ENDS TONIGHT
"SPARKLE" (PG)
SHOWN AT 7:00 & 9:00
OPEN at 6:45
TOMORROW-EAST MEETS WEST
The Fastest Gun In The West Joins With
The Most Brutal Hands In The East!
cOLUMBIA tURES A iHABOP PsUCONS and SHAW BRO HERS ID o o os A n'AR P
PLUS: TWO-FISTED BRONSON ACTION
A W MGR D ON Prouctuon
wD INS T e
}otcer . snrG'o E sxic'n s~rn.ta.,~n* r. . '6

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan