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June 17, 1976 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1976-06-17

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, June 17, 1976

Per TaTH.IHIA.AIYTurdy Jn 7,17

om--

Alaska pipeline builder
denies poor construction

Prisoners lose rights in India

..,,..

ANCHORAGE, Alaska a') -
Welded sections of the trans-
Alaskan oil pipeline are "the
best in the history of pipelin-
ing," says the man responsible
for the system, as a congres-
sional panel prepares to investi-
gate the system's construction.
"We're just over-controlling"
the quality of welds on the huge
pipeline system, says Edward
L. Patton, chairman of Alyes-
ka Pipeline Service Co.
THE congressional hearing,
which begins today in Wash-
ington, stems from an Alyeska
audit acknowledging the exist-
ence of about 4,000 problem
welds, which hold together each
40-foot pipe section.
Meanwhile, the head of the
international Pipeliners Union
798 in Tulsa, Okla., through
which all pipeline welders are
hired, has suggested the prob-
lem might not be the welds as
much as the pipes,
"I have to think that there's
something undetectable about

the welds that's not right, may-
be the texture of the steel,"
said Clifton Thorneberry, busi-
ness agent for the world's only
pipeline workers union.
"IT'S inconceivable to me
to think there are 4,000 bad
welds, or even 1,000 bad welds,"
said Thorneberry, noting that
Alyeska officials in Tulsa test
and certify every welder be-
fore he's sent to Alaska to work
on the pipeline.
Faulty seams, falsified weld
X rays, 358 stolen photographs
and claims of inefficient man-
agement control have led some
federal and Alaskan officials
to predict the project's com-
pletion could be delayed months
beyond its scheduled July 1977
inauguration date.
Some of the problem welds
in the 800-mile pipeline from
oil-rich Prudhoe Bay south to
Valdez are already buried in
below-ground sections of the
system and others already laid
under wild rivers.

NEW DELHI, India (/P-The
Indian government yesterday
tightened its grip on thousands
of political prisoners by extend-
ing for one year its right to
hold them without trial or for-
mal charges.
The move - extending the
time they can be held to two
years - was seen as a strong
indication that Prime Minister
Indira Kandhi had no imme-
diate plans to lift the state of
emergency she imposed last
June 26.
A GOVERNMENT statement
said the action was taken "for
dealing effectively with the
emergency" and came in the
form of a presidential ordinance
amending India's Maintenance
of Internal Security Act, the
government's main weapon for
holding political prisoners.
Under the amendment, pris-
oners may now be held for 24
months without being informed
of the charges against them
and without the right to petition
courts for their release.
The amendment is expected
to affect thousands of prison-

ers, but there is no way to esti-
mate the number more pre-
cisely.
THE INDIAN government has
never given out arrest or re-
lease figures, and opposition.
estimates of the number of po-
litical prisoners being held run
from 10,000 to 100,000.
The government's power of
preventive detention is set
forth clearly in tndia's 25-
year-old constitution, and the
Internal Security Act predates
the declaration of emergency.
But a prisoner's right to know
the grounds of his arrest was
suspended in one of several de-
crees by President Fakhruddin
Ali Ahmed when the emergen-
cy was declared. The president
was appointed by Gandhi and
holds a largely ceremonial of-
fice.
AHMED SAID last June that
"a grave emergency exists
whereby the security of India
is threatened by external ag-
gression and internal disturb-
ances."
Gandhi was convicted June
12, 1975, of illegally using gov-
ernment officials to help in her
1971 campaign for Parliament.
She imposed the emergency to
counter "grave internal dang-
er" after the opposition launch-

ed a civil disobedience cam-
poign for her resignation. Her
conviction was overturned aft-
er a series of judicial deci-
sions.
The constitutionality of the
suspension was challenged in
court by 43 political prisoners,
including four members of Par-
liament.
The Supreme Court, by a 4-1
decision April 28, upheld the
government's right to suspend
almost all individual rights dur-
ing times of national emergen-
cy, including a prisoner's right
to a habeas corpus petition.
STATUE SEES LIGHT
KANSAS CITY (AP) - After
42 years in a dark storeroom, a
gigantic 1,200-year-old Buddha
has seen the light.
The nine-foot Japanese statue
is now permanently installed in
the new Frank Grant Crowell
Wing of Kansas City's Nelson
Gallery - Atkins Museum. The
300-pound Amida Buddha, pur-
chased in Kyoto in 1932, had
been relegated to virtual soli-
tude since 1934 because of
space limitations.
The new Crowell wing com-
pletes the Nelson nearly 42
years after it was first opened
to the public.

East Germany charged
with kidnaping guards

Television viewing tonight

BONN, West Germany (P) -
A diplomatic row flared be-
tween West and East Germany
yesterday as the Bonn govern-
mentment protested what it
termed the deliberate kidnap-
ing of two border guards by
Communist troops.
Mich:iel Kohl, head of East
Germany's mission in Bonn,
was handed an urgent demand
for release of the men.
Government spokesman Klaus
Boelling told reporters that the
high-level protest was decided
after West Germany's repre-
sentative in East Berlin unsuc-
cessfully demanded clarifi-
cation for the second time.
Boelting denied East German
claims that the border guards
were arrested on Communist
soil near the northern Hesse
state town of lleilighausen late
Tuesday.

Interior Minister Werner
Maihofer told the cabinet yes-
terday that the men were ab-
ducted from West German ter-
ritory "with a probability bor-
dering on certainty,"
The Bonn Interior Ministry's
official version is that the two
men set off on a border patrol
at 9:30 a.m. local time Tues-
day, using a footpath about
two to five yards inside West-
ern territory. No witnesses saw
the actual capture, which was
discovered when they failed to
make a routine report by walk-
ie-talkie an hour later.
Both knew the area well. The
frintier bears clear, undisputed
markings set up by a joint
East-West border commission,
a snokesman said.
For the two guards to have
strayed 60 yards inside East
German territory as Commun-

ist authorities claimed, they
would have had to cross East
German fences designed to pre-
vent refugees fleeing westward.
Boelling said he refuses to
enter into speculation that the
frontier kidnaping may have
been retaliation for West Ger-
many's refusal to hand over
East German army defector
Werner Weinhold, 26.
Weinhold faces probable ex-
ecution in East Germany for
shooting two fellow frontier
guards when he fled westwards
last December.
He admitted shooting back at
the two guards in self-defense.
A West German court ruled he
acted in self-defense and Wein-
hold was freed but a prosecu-
tor in Essen had him jailed
again saying there was no men-
tion of self-defense.

6:00 27111t3sNEWS
: BEVERLY HILLBILLIES
t0 CISCO KID
50 BRADY BUNCH
6t I SPY
F:0 4 13 NBC NEWS
9 NEWS
11 CBS NEWS
20 DANIEL BOONE
50 I LOVE LUCY
sit02Cut NEWS
a BOWLING FOR DOLLARS
7 ABC NEWS
11 BRADY BUNCH
13 HOGAN'S HEROES
56 BLACK PERSPECTIVE
ON TBE NEWS
50 MICHIGAN STATE LOTTERY
SPEAKING OF SPORTS
7:30 2 TREASURE HUNT
4 AMERICAN LIFE STYLE
7 MATCH GAME PM
9 ROOM 222
11 WILD KINGDOM
S3 ADAM-St
20 IT TAKES A THIEF
50 HOGAN'S HEROES
56 EVENING EDITION WITH
MARTIN AGRONSKY
8:00 2 55 WALTONS
4 13 MAC DAVIS
7 24 WELCOME BACK, KOTTER
9 MUSIC MAKERS
50 MERV GRIFFIN
56 DETROIT BLACK NEWS
62 MOVIE-
"Gun Battle at Monterey."
8:30 7 24 BARNEY MILLER
9 ROLF HARRIS
20 WRESTLING
56 BLACK JOURNAL
9:00 2 1 HAWAII FIVE-O
4 13 MOVIE-"Lanigan's Rabbi"
7 STREETS OF SAN
FRANCISCO
9 OUR FELLOW AMERICANS
56 MYSHKIN
9:30 9 POINTS EAST:
POINTS WEST-Variety
50 DINAH!
10:a0 2 PRESIDENTS: 75 YEARS
ON CAMERA
724 ABC NEWS CLOSEUPS:

POITRAITS
9 AMERICA
11 BARNABY JONES
56 MILL MOVERS' JOURNAIL
62 PTL CLUB--Relsion
10:30 20 MANNA
11:00 2 4 7 11 13 NEWS
9 CBC NEWS-Lloyd Robe-rtsn
20 ADVENTURES SN PARISE
56 BEST OF GROUCHO
56 IT'S YOUR TURN
11:30 2 MARY IIARTMAN,
MARY IHARTMAN
4 13 JOHNNY CARSON
7 MANNIX
9 NEWS
SI MOVIE-"Made in Paris"
56 MOVIE-"NorthernS PSttsiit"
56 ABC NEWS
12:00 2 MOVIE-Drama
"Drive Hard, Drive Fast"
s MOVIE-"The River's Edge"
62 NEWS
12:40 7 MAGICIAN
1:00 4 TOMORROW
13 NEWS
1:20 11 NEWS
1:50 7 NEWS
2:00 2 MOVIE-"Ih-underbirds"
4 CLASSROOM
2:30 4 NEWS
3:10 2 NEWS
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVI, No. 31-5
Thursday, June 17, 1976
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published d a i l y Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription
rates: $12 Sept. thru April (2 semes-
ters) ; $13 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.
Summer session published Tues-
day t h r o u g h Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $6 50 in Ann
Arbor; $7.50 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.

I

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GOODI ES T HAT
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STRAWBERRY-$1.50
Two lae Crepes filled with Ice Cream, taped with Strawberries,
Whipoed Cream
BLUEBERRY-$1.50 J.R.L.C. Special-$1.75
Two large Crepes filled with ice Two large Crepes filled with Ice
Cream, topped with Blueberries Cream, taped with Sauteed Ba-
with Whipoed Cream nonos with Whipped Cream
ICE CREAM SHERBET SPUMONI ICE CREAM
$.50 $.75
SUNDAES
$.85
28(10 Jackson R oad

NORTH CUT
CANOE LIVERY and SALES
"AR, OSCWMO-N Scenic CANOE
. GGSTRIPS
tAKE , EX DOWN the 'Cut'
# - North Cut Canoe Livers
o CANOE
LIVERY i & Sales, Hiqins Lake
""_rCounty Road 100-Near
Hiaains Lake South State
S o LAB park. Pick-uos at 12 mile
bridge or at 24 Mile
s Houahton Lake exit. The
Cut is 24 miles of un-
s oiled wilderness scen-
T P11'erv.
M UHTON * ev
Phone: 517-821-9521
"HAVE YOU DISCOVERED THE CUT?"

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