100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 07, 1976 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-05-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

- macv. MOV 7. 1 v to I Ht MK Hl( DAILY r - - - - - - - - - - - . .... -

Page Five

_ . r

'U' expert backs)I

(Continued from Page 3) f
panies were reluctant to make 200 mil-
lion doses unless there was some guar-
antee that they could sell them.
"YOU CAN'T order business to make
a product, they have a responsibility to
their stockholders," he said. "The com-
panies make what they think they can
sell."
Davenport said the election year "may
have accelerated the decision." and that
if this program were needed in a non-
election year "Congress would have de-

bated and time could have run out."
Trial doses of vaccine have already
been made and are in the process of
being tested, for this, the largest innocu-
lation program ever attempted. Dasen-
port said it is not yet known whether
the vaccine works or if the industry will
be willing to go through with production.
But, he projects innoculations will start
by August for "high risk" persons, elder-
ly and women in the last trimester of
pregnancy.
Davenport maintains total faith in the

lu plan
industrial capacity of the four major drug
manufacturers and is convinced that once
production moves into high gear the tar-
geted 200 million doses will be met. Prior
to this, 50million vaccinations was the
highest ever attempted.
Part of the $135 million needed to make
the vaccine available on this scale will
go to chicken farmers for eggs, which
are needed to produce the vaccine. Both
egg and chicken prices may rise as a
result of the amount of vaccine being
produced.
RICHLER APPOINTED
S NEW YORK 1P-Novelist Mor-
decai Richler has been appointed
to the editorial board of the
up for Book-of-the-Month Club.
Richler has been the club's
age was literary advisor in Canada for
gislature the past two years.

7 bowling lanes
and
14 game machines
at UNION PINBALL
and BOWLING
Open till 1 am, tonight
THtS ISYOUR PROGRAMME
ONE YEARA
1F ~Wik
. a 1H '
the wu tinsti e

Reps debate State drinking ac

LANSING (UPI) - The
sponsor of two bills that would
raise the legal drinking age
back to 2t said yesterday that
two Democrats are deliberate-
ly blocking action on them, de-
spite growing support from
other lawmakers.
"I've recently received word
from Rep. Paul Rosenbaum,
chairman of the~Judiciary Com-
mittee, that he feels the bill is
unconstitutional," said Rep.
Melvin DeStigter (R-Allendale).
"REP. Stephen Stopczynski,
who chairstthe Liquor Control
Committee, refuses to put these
bills on the committee agenda
for consideration. In fact, the
liquor committee is not meet-
ing on a regular basis so that
those members who want to
consider these two bills can
bring them up for discussion.,"
DeStigter called the claim
that the proposals are unconsti-
tutional "a weak argument
against bringing them up for
discussion."
Since the two bills were in-
troduced, they have gained the
support of law enforcement
agencies and school groups.

"The legislature has the
power to establish the levels at
which people pay taxes, drive
automobiles, work, vote and
drink," DeStigter said. "If we
had the authority to lower the
drinking age in 1972, we have
the authority to raise it in
1976."
THE DRINKING age was
dropped to 18 after the state's
voters approved a constitution-
al amendment lowering the age
of majority from 21 to 18..
"All I'm asking is that the
bills have their full day in court
-a full and fair hearing so
that people on both sides of
this issue can be heard," De-
Stigter said.
"I'm convinced that the two
bills can stand on their own and
arguments for raising the
drinking age will overshadow
arguments against the propo-
sal."
DESTIGTER said he thinks
the liquor lobby has prevented
If you want to test for starch
in foods, add a few drops of
iodine which always prolices a
purple color in anything tli-
contains starch.

the bills from coming
debate.
"Since the drinking
lowered to 18 by the le

in 1972, the number of traffic
accidents involving drinking by
those between 18 and 21 have
increased," he said.
"There also have been prob-
lems in schools resulting from
drinking, including making al-
coholic beverages more easily
obtainable by 15 and 16-year-
olds."
LET US HELP YOU PLAN
AHEAD TO BECOME A C PA
CPA
REIEW
DETROIT 313 542-1666

CA- 85 ART CLASSES '
* START WEEK OF MAY 10
I ir, schedule of Workshops in 1
S[. Fine Arts and [ Dance
- Crafts-Phyia Art
(S [ Photography ysica s
NAM E __ _ __ _ _I
LAST FIRST PHONL
ADDRESS:
STREET CITY ZIP
2132 S. MAIN ST., ANN ARBOR, MI. 48108
i 994-8400

Why not join the DAILY?
THE DAILY IS A GREAT PLACE TO:
" meet other good people
" drink 5c Cokes
" learn the operations of a newspaper
" write stories
" see your name in print
" earn a little money
Come on down to 420 Maynard anytime and
join the business, news, sports or photography
staffs!
Udall1
IS COMING
to the
Ann Arbor
Farmer's Market
SATURDAY, MAY 8
at 10 a.m.
come to meet and hear the
candidate for president who
speaks out on the issues.

just Jeans season...
New jeans, tops & belts
K Latest styles & colors
q A Great Just Jeans prices
- >Good timescomin'onI,
- A

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan